Skip to main content

Full text of "The story of the 139th field artillery, American expeditionary forces"

See other formats


THE STORY 

OF THE 

139th Field Artillery 

AMERICAN 
EXPEDITIONARY FORCES 



BY 

ROBERT L. MOORHEAD, 

Colonel Field Artillery, 0. R. C. 

(Commanding the Regiment.) 



INCLUDING 

A HISTORY OF EACH BATTERY 

As Written by Members of the 
Organization While in France, 

TOGETHER WITH 

A roster of each unit 

, As of Date of Demobilization. 



INDIANAPOLIS : 

THE BOBBS-MERRILL COMPANY 

PUBLISHERS. 






By'T^e Bo^BS-ME^mi-L Company 



DEDICATED 

TO 

The Memory of Our Comrades Who 
Lie ** Between Crosses." 

WE 

Who Return Rededicate Ourselves 

TO 

The Service of Our Country 

in Time of Peace. 



jyi7054* 



G. H. Q. 

AMERICAN EXPEDITIONARY FORCES, 

lENEiUL Or«i)cns( France, February 2«, t9i9: 

No. 38- A. J 

MY FbLLOW SOLDIERS: 

Now that your service with the American Expeditionary Forces is about to 
terminate. I can not let you go without a personal word. At the call to arms, 
the patriotic yojung manhood of America eagerly responded and became the 
formidable army whose decisive victories testify to Its efficiency and its valor 
With the support of the nation flrmly united to defend the cause of liberty, 
our army has executed the will of the people with resolute purpose. Our democ- 
racy has been tested, and the forces of autocracy have been defeated. To the 
glory of the citizen-soldier, our troops have faithfully fulfilled their tmst, and 
in a succession of brilliant offensives have overcome th« me^^ac* to our eivili- 

CAtiOO. 

As an individual, your part in the world war has been an important one in 
the sum total of our achievements. Whether Iteeping lonely vigil in the trenches, 
or gallantly storming the enemy's stronghold; whether enduring monotonous 
drudgery at the rear, or sustaining the fighting line at the front, each has 
bravely and efficiently' played his part. By willing sacrifice of personal rights; 
by cheerful endurance of hardship and privation; by vigor, strength and in- 
domitable wilU made effective by thorough organization and cordial co-opera- 
tion, you inspired the war-worn Allies with new life and turned the tide of 
threatened defeat into overwbelming victory. 

With a consecrated devotion to duly and a will to conquer, you have loy- 
ally served your country By your exemplary conduct a standard has been 
established and maintained never before attained by any army. With mind 
and body as clean and i>trong as the decisive blows you delivered against the 
foe, you are soon to retam to the pursuits of peace In leaving the scenes 
of your victories, may I ask that you carry home your high ideals and con- 
tinue to live M you have served — an honor to the principles for which oa 
have foQght and to the fallen comrades you leave behind. 

It Is with pride in our success that I extend to you my sincere thanks for 
yoor splendid service to the army and to the nation. 

PaltbfaUy. 




Cttmmand^r in ChUft 



QrrrcfiXt 

ROflFRT C. DAVIS. 
Adjutant Genend. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PART I 



I. Organization of the Regiment ... 1 

II. Fort Benjamin Harrison 11 

III. The Trip to Camp Shelby . . .21 

IV. Reorganization of the Regiment ... 25 
V. The 139th Field Artillery .... 31 

VI. School at the 4th Field Artillery . . 39 

VII. The Winter of 1917-1918 . . . . . 45 

VIII. The Summer of 1918 51 

IX. The Franco-British Training Mission . 59 

X. The Last Days at Camp Shelby . ... 67 

XL To the Port of Embarkation .... 71 

XII. On the Atlantic 75 

XIII. England 87 

XIV. France 99 

XV. Billets . . . . ; 107 

XVI. Camp de Meucon 127 

XVII. Brest and Camp Pontanezen .... 139 

XVIII. Homeward Bound 151 

XIX. Demobilization 159 

XX. The Chaplain's Chapter 175 

XXL The American Legion . . . . . .179 

XXII. Notes from Sergeant Major's Diary . 183 

Appendix I 200 

Appendix II 204 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PART II 



Headquarters Company 209 

Supply Company 255 

Company A, 4th Indiana Infantry . . 281 

Company B, 4th Indiana Infantry . . 287 

Battery A 297 

Company C, 4th Indiana Infantry . . 307 

Company D, 4th Indiana Infantry . . 311 

Battery B 315 

Company E, 4th Indiana Infantry . . 327 

Company F, 4th Indiana Infantry . . 335 

Battery C 343 

Company G, 4th Indiana Infantry . 363 

Company H, 4th Indiana Infantry .„ 371 

Battery D 381 

Battery E (Company I, 4th Ind. Infty.) . 405 

Battery F (Company K, 4th Ind. InftyJ . 427 
(Troop B, 1st Sqdn. Ind. Cav.j 

Sanitary Detachment 461 



PART ONE 
The Story of the Regiment 

AS RELATED 
By the Regimental Commander. 







r 






1 






M^m 


c 




Ht 








w 




W'^m 


c 
















i ^ 


fti 
















■' s% 


a. 




■ 






1 


' 1 




^^^'Pii 


C3 








. \^^ . ,,. 








'■ ^!^ 


u 




B 




8'if'P'«(4'"^ 


i-' 1 


ji 




%''\ 


4> 








? 


fe;.c. *. 








t> 




^B 




fe 


^ 1 








.H 








s 


IK-^ 














I ^. ^HitSt&^^.P 


^Hk'' 
















■msmmmsfw 


<B£ ' 


^HR|< 








a 




^^^^^K^ 


w&MIm 


^ >rMHH 


Bppr 








o 




^^^^^mf 




, .."^r": •■' ■ 


JP^" <•:;:- 








»«r< 


















«r5 




^^Mm 




»i^^i^ 


ijtet/ 


ft ■' 






9 










Upppf * ff 








—i 




J^^^l 


' 


All 




»l 






! 




9 
_ 




JN 


V' 


li- 












k. 


1^^ 


f 








z 






Ek. 


Sa 


- * ii 








z 




-flH 


HI'. 


9S 


'jfei< ,^ 








> 




■ 


f 




'^c: 








u 




^^^■r. 


9^- jr.- 


m^m i"^ 


^:Mm- . 








o 




^^^K 














« 




^^BV 














z 




^^^BH^' 














o 




^^^^,f ■'• 














a 




^^^Kl.'' 














> 




^^HK< 






jf' 








z 




^^^■P« 






(•jg 








Ui 




Hp:' 






V. 




• ;,, ■; 


■ *■ .-^i 


»«. 




^^t^ 






^ ■.' 




\ ■■ '•'"■ 


m 


Ifl 




^^^^^^,, 






. ^^Bi.!. 






a» 




^^^^■p^' 






i^K tS 




■ • : '■ ♦ ■ 


W VM 


« 


^*>> 






■1 
1" 




^ 


■ 


PI 

if 


iJ 


1 


'^{'jM 


,|, 


IS 




^ 




f 


imM 


^Jfe^ 


r»,i 











THE STORY 

OF THE 



139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 



CHAPTER I . ......,..,.,.. , 

Organization of the Regiment 

In January, 1917, Governor Goodrich appointed Colonel 
Harry B. Smith of Indianapolis to be Adjutant General 
of the State of Indiana. Perhaps no officer ever came to 
this office better equipped temperamentally, professionally 
and by experience to cope with the important work and 
problems that this office had to handle and solve in the 
nation's participation in the war which then appeared 
inevitable. For seventeen years I had served under the 
command of Colonel Smith in the 2d Infantry, I. N. G., 
including that regiment's service in the Spanish American 
war, and had every opportunity to become acquainted 
with his capacity and excellent ability. 

It has been my endeavor in the administration of this 
regiment to carry out the lessons learned from such able 
officers as my former regimental commanders, the late 
Colonel James R. Ross, Colonels Harry B. Smith and Henri 
T. Conde and General Will J. McKee, all to whom I shall 
always owe a great debt. I count it as one of the greatest 
opportunities of my life to have been able to serve as a 
young man under these sterling soldiers. 

The Indiana National Guard, with the exception of one 



2 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

regiment, the 2d Infantry, had just returned from the 
Mexican border. These regiments were not in the best of 
condition. Upon the recommendation of the regular army 
Inspector-instructor for the State of Indiana, Adjutant 
General Smith removed a number of the officers at this 
time and reorganized the 1st and 3d Regiments of the 
Indiana Infantry with the view to bringing them up to a 
higher standard of efficiency. 

Authority was given by the War Department for the 
expansion* of the artillery battalion into a regiment of 
fie^/ krtyicryi fo^ th-e organization of a battalion of 
engineers; a squadron of cavalry and an additional regi- 
ment of infantry. 

The additional infantry regiment, the 4th Indiana 
Infantry, had not been reorganized since 1898 when it 
was mustered out of service at the close of the Spanish 
American War. Its designation as a war regiment was 
the 160th Indiana Volunteer Infantry. 

By the end of April a number of towns had partially 
organized and offered companies but the policy of the 
War Department was to accept only a company from a 
community which was large enough to sustain the com- 
pany as a national guard organization in times of peace. 
For this reason some of the companies which were offered 
were not accepted. By the middle of June the following 
companies were organized and mustered. A, Decatur, 
Captain Charlie R. Dunn commanding; B, Rushville, 
Captain John H. Kiplinger commanding; C, Huntington, 
Captain Frank E. Livengood, of Indianapolis, Infantry 
unassigned, who was detailed as instructor for the new 
units of the Indiana National Guard, was at the request 
of the citizens of Huntington, appointed to the command 
of this company; D, Indianapolis, Captain Nathan Morris 



ORGANIZATION 3 

commanding; E, Marion, Captain Harry R. Hall com- 
manding; F, Bedford, Captain Tony Coston, a former 
regular army sergeant instructor assigned to Indiana 
National Guard, was appointed to command; G, Evans- 
ville, Captain Caleb K. Wheeler commanding; H, Colum- 
bus, Captain Don L. Essex commanding; I, Madison, 
Captain Horace O. Woolford commanding. Company K, 
originally known as the Goodrich Guards, Indianapolis, 
was mustered into the state service and incorporated 
into this regiment as K Company, Captain Will T. 
Stalnaker commanding. 

About the first of July, upon my return from an 
inspection trip to the companies of the 1st Indiana Infan- 
try, of which I was then the Lieutenant Colonel com- 
manding, Adjutant General Smith informed me that I 
had been selected to command the new 4th Regiment and 
detailed me to complete the organization without delay 
in order to have the regiment ready for draft into the 
federal service August 5th. The organization of two 
companies of infantry; a machine gun company; a supply 
company and headquarters detachment was required. An 
additional infantry company designated as Company L was 
organized in Indianapolis by Captain Herbert W. McBride, 
of Culver Military Academy staff, a soldier formerly of 
the Indiana National Guard who had recently returned 
from over seas where he had won distinction and renown 
in the Canadian service and had been decorated for acts 
of heroism by the King of England and by the Com- 
mander-in-Chief of the French armies. This regiment was 
fortunate in having Captain McBride although he re- 
mained with us only a short time. Company M was 
organized in Anderson through the efforts of Colonel 
Winfield T. Durbin, former governor of Indiana. Walter 




CAPTAIN HERBERT W. McBRIDE 
D. S. M. Croix de Guerre Medalle Militaire 



ORGANIZATION 

F. McKinney, a sergeant instructor of the regular army 
recently stationed at Purdue University was appointed 
to the command of the company upon the recommendation 
of Colonel Durbin. Lieutenant Dan Brown, Jr., of Indi- 
anapolis, Captain of the Shrine Catling Gun Patrol, 
recruited and organized the Machine Gun Company. Ser- 
geant-major R. G. Igoe, of the regular army, an instructor 
.in the machine gun school at Ft. Sill, was, on account of 
his technique and knowledge of machine guns, appointed 
commanding officer of this company. Captain Harvey B. 
Stout, Jr., of Indianapolis, organized the Supply Company, 
an Indianapolis unit and a remarkable organization. 

At the time authorization was made for the squadron of 
cavalrj^ it was the understanding that a supply company 
would be included with the squadron and one was organ- 
ized by Mr. Walter Pfaff, of Indianapolis. 

As this unit was not included in the revised tables of 
organization for the cavalry squadron, it became available 
for use as the headquarters detachment of the 4th Infan- 
try and was mustered as such. The men had been selected 
on account of their special qualifications and it proved to 
be an excellent unit. 

By the middle of July the organization of the units of 
the regiment was practically complete. Major Robert P. 
Youngman, Crawfordsville, the senior major of the 2d 
Infantry was appointed Lieutenant Colonel and assigned 
to the 4th Infantry. Upon the recommendation of the 
regimental commander the following battalion com- 
manders were assigned to this regiment: Major Clyde 
F. Dreisback of Ft. Wayne, formerly a major of the 2d 
Infantry; Major Walter H. Unversaw, inspector-general 
Indiana National Guard and Captain J. A. Umpleby of 



6 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

the 1st Indiana Infantry. Captain Ernst E. Chenoweth 
of Winchester, a capable officer of long experience was 
appointed adjutant; Rev. Birchard Brundage, a Presby- 
terian pastor of Anderson, was appointed Chaplain. The 
sanitary detachment was organized at Rushville by First 
Lieutenant Lowell M. Green, Medical Corps. Major N. A. 
Carey, Medical Corps, of Crawfordsville, was appointed 
Regimental Surgeon. Captain Don McClellan was assigned 
as Surgeon and First Lieutenant Walter W. Gochenour as 
Dental Surgeon. 

On August 5th, in response to the President's proclama- 
tion the units of the regiment assembled at their home 
stations and formally came into federal service. The regi- 
mental headquarters. Companies D, K, L, Machine Gun, 
Headquarters and Supply Companies, together with the 
battalion commanders, rendezvoused at the State Fair 
grounds at Indianapolis. The equipment of the regiment 
consisted of the national and regimental colors of the 
former 4th Indiana Infantry. Aside from this there was 
absolutely no quartermaster's or ordnance property fur- 
nished the regiment. Most of the men individually pur- 
chased campaign hats, 0. D. shirts, khaki breeches, garrison 
shoes, and by the time the regiment left for the training 
camp nearly every man in the regiment had so equipped 
himself at his own expense. A few of the men brought 
blankets, some quilts and others contented themselves 
with newspapers for bed covering. The companies were 
quartered in the Fine Arts Building and other buildings 
at the State Fair grounds. In accordance with the War 
Department instructions the men were first subsisted 
by a contractor who furnished meals. This did not prove 
satisfactory and later subsistence was purchased corres- 



ORGANIZATION 7 

ponding to the garrison ration and cooked by the com- 
panies' cooks. 

Intensive training was taken up immediately, the 
schedule followed being that used in the first officers' 
training camps, slightly modified. 

Recruiting was still carried on at the recruiting office 
on East Market Street and at a tent on the Monument 
Circle where men were enlisted daily. In accordance 
with instructions from the War Department, the State 
Mustering Officer, Colonel E. A. Root, Infantry U. S. A., 
assisted by officers of the 2d Indiana Infantry, which 
had remained continuously in the federal service, mustered 
the units of the regiment as soon as the physical exam- 
ination was completed. A reserve Major Medical Corps, 
with assistants, re-examined all officers and men and 
those who were not then accepted physically were dis- 
charged. About 4 per cent of the men were rejected, most 
of whom were under weight. The standard for the 
physical examination at that time was much higher than 
later and I believe that all of the men who were rejected 
on account of being under weight were accepted for 
service later. 

The first Sunday service held by our chaplain was in 
the Coliseum. From the beginning these services were 
well attended. Practically every man in the regiment 
attended the chaplain's services while at Indianapolis. 
The first regimental parade was held on Sunday afternoon, 
August 12th. It was a fearful and wondrous spectacle. 

First Lieutenant Ora B. Keller was appointed regi- 
mental exchange officer and established his exchange in 
one of the stalls of the Coliseum with a stock consisting 
of a tub of lemonade. This was the beginning of a success- 
ful and profitable venture for the regiment. In fact it 



8 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

would have been hard for the regiment to have gotten 
along without the benefits of this exchange. For several 
months the only transportation we had was a Ford motor 
car and trailer which we purchased from the earnings of 
the exchange. This served for nearly a year as the 
"Regimental Ford." 

I accepted an invitation from the citizens of Columbus 
to attend a farewell reception to Company H. Nearly 
everyone in the county was present and a most enjoyable 
feast, that is the only word that can describe it, was 
given. The Chaplain, Major Unversaw and I each made 
a talk, and I learned then and there to let the Chaplain 
speak first, we spoke here in order of rank. 

On Sunday, August 26th, this regiment, together with 
the 1st Indiana Field Artillery (150th) accepted an invi- 
tation to give a parade in Indianapolis. By this time the 
men were practically all uniformed and the three weeks 
intensive training enabled them to march with some 
degree of precision. As a whole they made a fairly cred- 
itable appearance, considering the limited amount of 
training. 

On August 27th, in accordance with orders from the 
Central Department, the regiment mobilized at Fort 
Benjamin Harrison, the companies from the Fair Ground 
moving via traction and the other companies by rail. 
Company B, of Rushville, had previously been designated 
to go to Camp Shelby, Hattiesburg, Mississippi, to pre- 
pare quarters in the camp there for our regiment. With 
the regiment assembled at Fort Harrison the training 
of all the units of the regiment was accelerated. While 
we were at the Fair Grounds the battalion commanders 
made several trips of inspection and to instruct companies 
which were in rendezvous at their home stations and 



ORGANIZATION 9 

arranged a uniform schedule of instruction for all. It 
was noticeable, however, that the companies which had 
been daily under the supervision of their field officers at 
the State Fair Grounds had advanced further than those 
at the home stations that did not have this stimulus. 
School for the officers was held in the evenings. 

FOURTH REGIMENT OF INFANTRY 
(Headquarters at Indianapolis) 

Regimental Field Officers and Chaplain 

Colonel, Robert L. Moorhead Indianapolis 

Lt. Col., Robert P. Youngman Crawfordsville 

Chaplain, Birchard Brundage Anderson 

Headquarters Company 

Reg. Adjt., Capt. Ernst E. Chenoweth Winchester 

Band Sect.. Clinton 

Machine Gun Company 

• 

Capt., Robert G. Igoe, Commanding Indianapolis 

1st Lt., Dan Brown, Jr Indianapolis 

2nd Lt, Harry Bridwell Indianapolis 

2nd Lt., Charles Brautigam Indianapolis 

Supply Company 

Capt., Harvey B. Stout, Jr., Commanding Indianapolis 

2nd Lt, Raymond Allen Indianapolis 

First Battalion 

Major, Clyde F. Dreisback, Commanding Fort Wayne 

1st Lt, Russell L. Figert, Adjutant Indianapolis 

Company A, Decatur Company B, Rushville 

Capt., Charlie R. Dunn Capt., John H. Kiplinger 

1st Lt, Robert H. Peterson 1st Lt., Allen H. Blacklidge 

2nd Lt., George J. Rollison 2nd Lt., William Kreber 

Company C, Huntington Company D, Indianapolis 

Capt., Frank E. Livengood Capt, Nathan A. Morris 

1st Lt, Oscar D. Dyer 1st Lt., Stewart Jackson 

2nd Lt., Travis S. Whitsel 2nd Lt., Edwin C. Ball 

2 



10 



THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 



Second Battalion 

Major, Walter H. Unversaw, Commanding Iranklin 

1st Lt., Otis E. Gulley, Jr., Adjutant Indianapolis 



Company E, Marion 
Capt., Harry R. Hall 

1st Lt., Ross E. Watson 
2nd Lt., Verlin C. Goss 

Company G, Evansville 
Capt., Caleb K. Wheeler 

1st Lt., Henry N. Odell 
2nd Lt., Charles J. Folz 



Company F, Bedford 
Capt,, Tony Coston 

1st Lt., William Ingalls 
2nd Lt., L. C. Pitts 

Company H, Columbus 
Capt., Don Essex 

1st Lt, Floyd Anderson 
2nd Lt., Emil T. Wagner 



Third Battalion 

Major, Jay A. Umpleby, Commanding Gary 

1st Lt., Otto Lindgren, Adjutant Gary 



Company I, Madison 
Capt., Horace O. Woolford 

1st Lt., Harry H. Cope 
2nd Lt, John W. Driggs 

Company L, Indianapolis 
Capt., Herbert W, McBride 

1st Lt, Lawrence O. Rarick 
2nd Lt., 



Com/pany K, Indianapolis 
Capt., Will T. Stalnaker 

1st Lt., Ora B. Keller 
2nd Lt., 

Company M, Anderson 
Capt., Walter F. McKianey 

1st Lt., Edgar C. Murray 
2nd Lt., Beecher K. Wright 



Regimental Infirmary 

Major, N. Austin Cary, Commanding Crawfordsville 

Capt., Don C. McClelland Lafayette 

1st Lt, Lowell M. Green Rushville 

1st Lt., Samuel C. Murphey Warsaw 

1st Lt., Walter W. Gochenour, Dental Surgeon. Brookston 



CHAPTER II 

Fort Benjamin Harrison 

The month at Fort Benjamin Harrison was put in 
the closest kind of intensive training. Our regiment was 
new — had not had the benefit of the Mexican border 
training — and hard work was necessary to overcome 
the handicap of being a new regiment. Officers and 
men alike were interested and anxious to train. 

The second officers training camp was at Fort Harrison 
at this time. We followed this course of instruction and 
training except that we increased the number of hours 
of drill and held our school for officers in the evening — 
this left little time for study. 

While we were here I spent practically all the time on 
the drill field, supervising and observing the work of 
the officers. The battalion commanders were in turn 
responsible for the training of their battalions and each 
was keen to have the best battalion. 

We drew some uniforms and equipment from the Post 
Quartermaster, but hardly any ordnance. The lack of 
canteens and mess gear prevented our making any 
extended practice marches. As the instruction progressed 
we undertook, largely to vary the monotony of the train- 
ing, small tactical problems and maneuvers. Always I 
have felt that these were of great benefit to those en- 
gaged and especially to the officers and non-commissioned 
officers. 



12 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

HEADQUARTERS 4th INDIANA INFANTRY 

Ft. Benjamin Harrison, August 27, 1917. 

I. The following calls and schedule will be observed daily except 
Sundays. 

5:20 A. M. First Call 

5:30 Reveille 

6:00 Mess — Breakfast 

6 : 45-7 : 00 Setting Up Exercises 

7:15-8:15 Road March (Step, Cadence and Interval to be kept). 

8:30-10:30 Drill 

1st half School of Soldier 
2nd half School of Squad 
10:45 Sick Call 

11:00-12:00 School for Privates 

Military Courtesy 
11:30 1st Sergeants Call 

12:00 Mess — Dinner 

1:00-2:00 P. M. Officers School 
2:00-3:00 Non. Com. School 
3:15-5:00 Drill 

School of Company 



5:30 


Mess — Supper 


6:10 


First Call— Guard Mount 


6:15 


Guard Mount 


6:30 


Retreat 


7:30 


Officers School 


9:30 


Call to Quarters 


10:00 


Taps 



By Order of Colonel Moorhead, 
Ernst E. Chenoweth, 
Captain 4th Indiana Infantry, 
Adjutant. 

Several evenings each week we held parades — some- 
times regimental parade and at other times battalion 
parade. The improvement in the parade, the steadiness 
in ranks and marching was an index to the progress of 
the regiment's training. 

We had no rifles and by this time we had exhausted 
our ingenuity in making "squads right" interesting. In 
place of the Manual of Arms, instruction in "bombing" 
was started for those who had become sufficiently trained 
in the school of the squad. Captain McBride was the 
instructor in this course and under his direction several 
hundred dummy grenades were made of cement and a 




LIEUT. COL. ROBERT P. YOUNGMAN 
Died January 29th, 1918 



14 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

bombing course laid out. Every man wanted to qualify 
as a ''bomber" and the bombing course was one of the 
busy places. 

At different times the battalions would march to the 
Officer's Training Camp and opportunity was given the 
men to observe the work of the students, especially the: 
laying out and digging of trenches, which we could not 
do for lack of tools of every kind. 

While we were at Fort Harrison, orders were received 
by Colonel Tyndall, commanding the 1st Indiana Field 
Artillery, assigning that regiment to the Rainbow Div- 
ision. I was instructed to transfer one hundred and 
twenty men to the 1st Indiana Field Artillery. It was 
impossible for all to go that wanted to get this opportun- 
ity for early service overseas and the men to be trans- 
ferred were selected by lot in most of the companies. 

The 1st and 3d Indiana Infantry were also in camp 
at Fort Harrison at the time we were there. These 
regiments had been recruited to war strength and the 
large influx of new men gave them a problem of recruit 
training similar to ours. There was also a regular infan- 
try brigade consisting of the 10th, 45th and 46th Infantry 
in training at Fort Harrison at that time — all busy 
training recruits — the 45th and 46th Infantry had just 
been organized, each from a battalion" of the old 10th 
Infantry. 

, The 1st Indiana Field Artillery left for Camp Mills in 
September, preparatory for embarkation overseas. 

Over a thousand medical officers — physicians and sur- 
geons from civil life — were attending a training course 
for medical officers at this time. In order to give these 
new Sanitarians some experience, a group would inspect 
our kitchens and camps daily. This was undoubtedly 



FORT BENJAMIN HARRISON 15 

good experience, both for the doctors, our cooks and 
mess sergeants — but the ever changing and conflicting 
criticisms and instructions to our men were confusing 
to say the least. Whenever no loss or real harm came 
from these instructions, I allowed them to be carried 
out as far as they did not conflict with the sanitary 
regulations as promulgated by Major Gary, our senior 
surgeon. 

Twenty-four-hour passes were granted to nearly all the 
command from Saturday 2 P. M. to Sunday 2 P. M., 
for the purpose of going home. 

Sunday afternoon the Chaplain held services under a 
large old elm tree, near the regimental headquarters, 
that has become famous thru William Herschel's poem, 
"The Chaplain's Elm." 

The Chaplain's Elm 

I never have cherished ambitions to be 

Regarded as more than a friendly old tree. 

Each summer, for years, with my wide-spreading boughs, 

Fve sheltered the horses, the sheep and the cows. 

Fve been a great tree in my time, but was told 

That even the mighty at last must grow old. 

And so, well resigned to Time's saddest decree, 

I parted with boughs that were precious to me. 

Then, as one who sorrows and later relents, 

I woke up one day in a city of tents. 

Beneath me were soldiers and music of bands. 

While 'round me there echoed the Colonel's commands. 

I heard him give orders delightful to me; 

"Have guard mount this evening beneath the old tree !" 



16 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 




THE CHAPLAIN'S ELM 

Again and again I was thrilled by salutes 

That came from the weary, shade-hungry recruits. 

'Twas then I awakened to Loyalty's needs — 

Had not other elms served their country with deeds? 



FORT BENJAMIN HARRISON 17 

Beneath them men fought and beneath them they made 

The laws in which freedom's foundation was laid. 

And so, with the Colonel, the Captains and all 

Fve entered the arm.y at Liberty's call. 

The Colonel, as yet, no assignment has made. 

But maybe I'll go as the Chaplain's first aid. 

Then I'd be his temple, and here in the shade 

He'd preach of a peace that can only be made 

When War's master-monarchs no longer shall throng 

The hills and the homes Vv here the happj^ belong. 

The last Sunday we were at Fort Harrison more than 
five thousand attended the Chaplain's services — the largest 
religious attendance I ever saw. 

After the church services, the men were at liberty 
with their friends until evening mess. Many of the fam- 
ilies would bring out basket suppers and eat picnic 
fashion with groups of soldiers. 

At regimental mess we always had guests on Sunday 
evening. I recall Colonel and Mrs. Durbiii; Colonel 
Smith, the Adjutant General of Indiana; Colonel Root, 
commanding the post, and relatives and friends of the 
field oflficers at these enjoyable Sunday evening meals. 

After mess we held Regimental Parade and Review. 
Thousands of visitors from Indianapolis and nearby, 
would be on hand to see our parade, which gave the 
men the opportunity of showing how they were advancing 
in their training. Judged critically, these parades were 
then far from good, but they represented much hard 
work and the best efforts of every man — and they gave 
the men and ofl^cers alike a pride in their regiment and 
helped create the esprit de corps that made the regiment 



18 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

eventually one of the best disciplined regiments in the 
service. 

According to the newspaper reports, Camp Shelby, 
near Hattiesburg, Mississippi, was to be the mobilization 
and training camp of the Division to which we were 
assigned, the 38th, consisting of the National Guard of 
Indiana, Kentucky and West Virginia. The time of our 
training as a division was to be four months and the 4th 
Indiana didn't intend to delay the division's schedule of 
training by being backward in the work. Every moment, 
literally, between reveille and taps was put in on work 
or study. 

Mr. William Blodgett, of the Indianapolis News, sent 
word from Hattiesburg that the 4th Indiana Infantry 
was to be transferred to the artillery arm and to be 
assigned as the heavy artillery regiment of the division. 
We knew whatever Mr. Blodgett said was so, but as 
nearly all of the officers of the regiment were infantry 
men of long experience, we could hardly credit the news. 
However I bought all the text-books on artillery that 
the Post Exchange had. 

The next day the representative of the American Rail- 
way Association called at my quarters and said he had 
instructions to provide transportation for our regiment to 
Hattiesburg. Telegraphic orders were also received the 
following day from the Commanding General, Central 
Department, Chicago, ordering the regiment to Hatties- 
burg. Upon receipt of this, I called on the representative 
of the American Railway Association with a list of the 
strength of the regiment and made a request for tourist 
Pullman cars. I was told that these probably could not 
be furnished. I answered that we were very comfortable 
where we were, and that I was going to insist on the 



FORT BENJAMIN HARRISON 19 

kind of transportation allowed and specified in Army 

'Regulations. I don't know what the agent telegraphecf 

Ito Chicago but the next day I received a telegram fron^ 

: Department Headquarters asking if I declined to accept 

;the transportation offered. I replied that none had been 

; offered as yet, that we would move when it came, and had 

requested transportation in accordance with the regu- 
i 
nations. We got Tourist Cars. 

Captain Stout arranged the trains and all details in 

; a manner that brought forth the most complimentary 

! remarks from the railroad's representatives. A baggage 

car on each train was equipped as a kitchen car where 

hot food was prepared en route. Our baggage loaded^ 

the regiment left Fort Harrison for Hattiesburg on; 

September 25th, in three sections — the first train, con-j 

sisting of the 1st Battalion and Machine Gun Company^ 

in command of Major Driesback; the second train, carry^ 

jing the 2d Battalion, Major Unversaw commanding. The 

third section carried regimental headquarters and thel 

3d Battalion. i 

The first two trains left in accordance with the train 

schedule to the minute, but the third section was delayed 

a few minutes. The large number of friends and relatives 

i 

of the men from Indianapolis crowded on the tracks and 
prevented the moving of the train from the siding to 
the main track. 




COLONEL ROBERT L. MOORHEAD 



CHAPTER III 

The Trip to Camp Shelby 

The third section of the train left Fort Harrison at 
12:10 P. M., via the Big 4. We were routed over the 
Big 4 to Evansville; Illinois Central from Evansville 
to Jackson, Mississippi; Gulf and Ship Island to Hatties- 
burg. As we passed thru Indianapolis and, indeed, every- 
where along the route of travel, we received an almost 
continuous round of waving of hands and cheering. 
Everyone was giving greetings and good luck to the 
departing soldiers. 

The officers and non-commissioned officers had been 
carefully instructed in their duties in moving by rail. The 
cars were kept policed and clean. After each meal every 
car was swept out. There was a complete absence of 
rowdyism of any form. The men read, played cards, 
wrote letters, but most of them, after we left Indiana, 
were in a country new to them, and as we went farther 
and farther south they spent the time looking out at the 
new sights. Few had seen cotton growing before and the 
other novel things kept their interest. 

Our first stop was at Paducah, Kentucky, the noon of 
the next day. The weather was very warm and the 
Illinois Central Railway traveling passenger represen- 
tative with our train told me that we could have a swim 
in the Ohio River at Paducah. This was just what we 
wanted and had been trying to arrange, so we tele- 
graphed to the Paducah agent, arranging for a delay 
there. 

21 



22 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Upon arrival at Paducah we were met by the mayor 
and a committee of citizens who welcomed us; a guide 
led our march through the city to the swimming place 
in the river. The bank and approach were very muddy, 
but never-the-less the swim was enjoyable and refreshing. 
Our band played lively airs and came in for much favor- 
able comment from the citizens. It was a good band then, 
even with the nondescript instruments, some of a different 
key, but adjusted to the same key as well as could be. 

At Paducah, the cars were iced and watered and then 
run up on a siding near our swimming place, we entrained 
and were again on our way south. That day and all the 
next day until afternoon we went steadily south. Our 
men were so well behaved and created such a good im- 
pression with the train crews as each time we changed 
crews, the conductor would comment upon it. I always 
replied that all Indiana soldiers conducted themselves 
that way. From some of the stories they told of other 
troop trains, I am inclined to believe that some very 
poorly disciplined commands had moved over the road 
previous to our movement. 

The next morning I received an invitation from the 
engineer to ride on the engine with him, and rode there 
for about fifty miles. He told me that he had heard that 
my name was the same as his and thought we might have 
originally had the same ancestor in Scotland. The Chap- 
lain rode most of the time in the cupola of the caboose. 
Here he could see ahead and on all sides, and was sure he 
would miss seeing nothing. 

Early in the afternoon we reached the outskirts of 
Jackson where we stopped for a short while. Vendors 
of all kinds came to the cars. I was sitting in our kitchen 
car finishing my dinner, when a fellow came up to me 



THE TRIP TO CAMP SHELBY 23 

and offered me a pint of "whiskey" for two dollars. 
Before I could have the boot-legger seized, one of our 
men stepped up to me, saluted and addressed me as 
''Colonel, sir:" the boot-legger, seeing his mistake, beat 
it faster than I think he ever moved before. 

Here the representative of the Illinois Central Railroad 
left us. He was very complimentary in his remarks about 
the conduct and behavior of our men en route. I let it 
be known to the men that the railroad men said they were 
the best behaved and most gentlemanly lot of soldiers 
the road had carried, and of course they were proud 
of this. 

We had a two hours delay to exercise and see Jackson. 
The Mississippi National Guard was in camp near Jackson 
and some of our men went out to see their camp. We 
had a short street march to stretch our legs and then 
the battalion broke up into small groups to looR over the 
town. It was very warm; I don't think I ever felt a 
warmer day. I made a short visit on a personal friend of 
mine living in Jackson, an author who was engaged upon 
a book I had arranged to publish. 

When we boarded the train again, it was for the last 
leg of our journey over the Gulf and Ship Island to 
Camp Shelby. Before dusk the character of the country 
changed as we entered the pine forests " of Southern 
Mississippi. About 11 o'clock we reached Hattiesburg. 
It was raining and somewhat cooler. Our transportation 
had been made out by the Central Department to Hatties- 
burg; Camp Shelby was twelve miles south of Hatties- 
burg and on the Mississippi Central Railroad; I gave the 
agent of the road a receipt for transportation of our 
train to Camp Shelby, explaining that they had no infor- 
mation at Headquarters Central Department that Camp 



24 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Shelby and Hattiesburg were not the same. We all 
thought of them as located together. 

About midnight we reached the landing platform at 
Camp Shelby and our journey was over. Major H. H. 
Weller, Camp Quartermaster, met the train and directed 
us to detrain. It was raining hard; I told him all our 
men were in the berths asleep, had been for two hours 
or more, and that we had no canvas or supplies of any 
kind. As he had no place for us to stay he authorized 
our remaining on the train for the rest of the night. 

He handed me an order from the Division Com- 
mander. I opened it and read it to the assembled officers. 
It stated that on October 1st, 1917, the 4th Indiana 
Infantry was transferred as Field Artillery (Heavy), 
being designated as the 139th U. S. F. A., less Companies 
L, M and M. G., which were transferred as the 139th 
Machine Gun Battalion. Then we all went to bed to think 
about being Artillery. 



CHAPTER IV 

Reorganization of the Regiment 

The next morning we detrained. After inspecting the 
train the train quartermaster secured a signed state- 
ment from the conductor and the porter of each car that 
no damage had been done and that all the property of 
the Pullman Company had been checked and that noth- 
ing was missing. Later, when claims were made against 
organizations of the Division for damages, and for prop- 
erty, towels, sheets and blankets taken from the trains, 
our clearance papers relieved us of any assessment and 
payment for damages. 

The companies assigned to be the 139th Machine Gun 
Battalion marched to their quarters which were but a 

i 

short distance from the train. The remainder of the bat- 
talion marched to the location assigned to the 139th F. A. 

The heavy rains had made the unfinished roads almost 
impassable and by night every truck of the Division 
Motor Truck Company was stalled in the mud on the roads 
en route to our camp. 

Part of our canvas had been put up by the companies 
of our regiment first arriving. The needed additional 
tents and supplies were carried by details from the ware- 
houses to our camp, over two miles by the road then 
open. Everyone was busy getting our new home in order. 

I reported to Brigadier General Lewis, then Command- 
ing General of the 38th Division and of Camp Shelby. 
In course of our conversation I stated that my military 
training had been entirely in the infantry arm and that 
3 




MAJOR WALTER H. UNVERSAW 



REORGANIZATION OF THE REGIMENT 27 

I felt I could be of better service to the government if 
I remained in this arm. I had had nearly twenty-five 
years experience in the infantry while I had no training 
or experience with the artillery arm. The General replied 
that was a condition the government was confronted 
with owing to the lack of the necessary trained artillery 
officers, all of our field officers and as many of the line 
officers as possible would be sent to Artillery Schools, 
and that this regiment had been selected for transfer 
to artillery after careful consideration. General Lewis 
then informed me that he had designated Major Umpleby 
to go immediately to the Artillery School at Fort Sill. 
I expressed a hope that I could soon go. He replied that 
all regimental commanders would be needed on their job 
for the next few months. Before leaving I requested 
that an Artillery officer be assigned to the regiment as 
instructor. 

Later in the day I called on Brigadier General H. H. 
Whitney, Commanding General of the 63d F. A. Brigade, 
and in course of our conversation told him we had no 
officers with artillery training or experience and asked 
for the assignment or detail of an officer of the Field 
Artillery. General Whitney directed me to submit a plan 
for the reorganization of the regiment in accordance with 
the Tables of Organization 6 inch Howitzer Regiment 
(Horse). 

To work out the consolidation of the companies into 
batteries required the merging of ten companies into 
six batteries and the enlargement of the Headquarters 
and Supply Companies. Companies A, Decatur, and B, 
Rushville, formed Battery A, Captain Charlie R. Dunn 
assigned to command. Captain John H. Kiplinger and 
twenty men of Company B were transferred and assigned 



28 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

to the new Headquarters Company. Companies C, Indi- 
anapolis, and D, Huntin^on, formed Battery B, Captain 
Nathan H. Morris assigned to command. Captain F. E. 
Livengood, of D Company, was placed on the unassigned 
list temporarily, pending a vacancy. Thus the original 
1st Battalion, 4th Indiana Infantry, was consolidated into 
two batteries and became the 1st Battalion 139th F. A. 

Major Clyde F. Driesback and his Adjutant, First 
Lieut. Otto Lindgren, were by division order, transferred 
to the 151st Infantry. Major Driesback was a capable, 
energetic and experienced officer whose transfer was a real 
loss to the regiment. Major Driesback afterwards became 
Lieutenant Colonel of the 152d Infantry and was gener- 
ally on special duty in the division, filling important 
assignments. For some months he was in command of 
the Detention Camp at Camp Shelby. 

Companies E, Marion, and F, Bedford, formed Batterj- 
C, Captain Harry R. Hall commanding. Captain Tony 
Coston, of F Company, was assigned as Adjutant of the 
1st Battalion. Companies G, Evansville, and H, Colum- 
bus, consolidated, became Battery D, Captain Caleb K. 
Wheeler commanding. Captain Don R. Essex was assigned 
Adjutant of the 2d Battalion. The companies of the 2d 
Battalion of the 4th Indiana Infantry became the 2d 
Battalion of the 139th F. A., Major Walter H. Unversaw 
commanding. 

Company I, Madison, was designated as Batterj^ E and 
surplus men in excess of the authorized strength of the 
2d Battalion were transferred to Battery E. Captain 
Horace 0. Woolford, formerly commanding officer of 
Company I, retained command. Company K, Indianapolis, 
became Battery F, Captain Will T. Stalnaker command- 
ing. A few days later, upon breaking up of the cavalry 



REORGANIZATION OF THE REGIMENT 29 

squadron, Troop B, Indianapolis, was transfered to the 
139th F. A. and assigned to Battery F. Captain Cortez 
J. Cobler, troop commander, was assigned as Adjutant 
of the 3d Battalion. Major Jay A. Umpleby, commanding 
the 3rd Battalion, 4th Indiana Infantry, was on detail 
at school at Fort Sill, and this left the 3d Battalion 
temporarily without a field officer. Captain Harvey B. 
Stout, Jr., continued in command of the Supply Com- 
pany which was increased by transfer of six men from 
each battery. 

Captain Ernst E. Chenoweth was relieved of duty 
with Headquarters Company in accordance with the 
tables of organization and continued as Regimental 
Adjutant. The personnel of the sanitarj^ units remained 
unchanged. 

The intention of the re-organization scheme was in 
complying with the order; to make as few changes as 
possible; to hold the units as originally recruited to- 
gether; and to do what was the simple, reasonable and 
obvious thing. The success of the consolidation was 
measured by the ability of the Battery Commanders in 
handling the personnel. 

The re-organization left the regiment with two field 
officers for duty, the Regimental Commander and Major 
Unversaw. Lieutenant Colonel Youngman was sick at 
his home in Crawfordsville. Major Cary, our senior 
surgeon informed me that Colonel Youngman would 
never recover his health and be able to return for duty. 

General Lewis rode through our camp each morning 
and I took occasion to call again to his attention the 
need of an Artillery Field Officer from the regular 
establishment to act as instructor of this regiment, one 
whose whole time could be devoted to the training and 



30 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

instruction of the officers in the technique of field artillery. 
He asked me to name someone and I proposed Major 
Albert L. Hall, F. A., U. S. A., of Indianapolis, formerly 
inspector-instructor of Artillery of the State of Indiana, 
should be assigned as Lieutenant Colonel of our regi- 
ment. This was requested of the War Department, but 
nothing resulted. 



CHAPTER V 

The 139th Field Artillery 

On the morning of October 1st, we took up our training 
as a Regiment of Field Artillery. We had no material 
of any kind nor any place to drill. We sent to Hattiesburg 
and bought up from the blacksmith shops all the wheels 
and axles we could find, and with them our mechanics 
improvised dummy guns, the tubes made of logs and the 
trails out of pine — the caissons and limber chests bore 
resemblance to real material; these were all painted olive 
drab and placed in our "gun park." 

Our camp was a cut over pine forest. The ground 
was covered with thousands of stumps, down wood, 
logs and young growth. This had been burned over 
some years ago and was generally black and charred. 
We cleaned up a piece each day, on several days we had 
nearly the whole regiment on this work, alternating by 
battalions. To the south of us and the east and to the 
west we collected monster piles of logs and stumps. More 
than a ton of dynamite was used in blasting out stumps. 
So accustomed did we become to the blast of the dyna- 
mite and the flying of the fragments of stumps that no 
one paid any attention unless warned to get out of the 
way. We kept at this for weeks until finally we had a 
large enough space for our regimental drill ground. 

Our camp was laid out for an infantry regiment, with 
fourteen mess shacks and streets. We did not use the 
four on the right which were later used by other units 
of diff'erent arms. In front of each mess shack was a 



32 THE STORY OP THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

brick incinerator, designed by some ingenious engineer 
to incinerate garbage. I saw one working on my way 
to camp, got the full benefit of the smell, the smoke and 
the soot from the fire. We never used them in the 139th 
F. A. — instead, we built a regimental incinerator to the 
flank of the regiment which kept us free from smoke 
and smells and was economical in operation — requiring 
only one fire and one detail for the regiment instead of 
one from each battery and company. Six months later 
a division order was issued, directing each regiment to 
operate a regimental incinerator, located at a suitable 
place, and to remove the brick incinerators in front of 
the kitchens. 

When the street through our regiment was finished, 
we planted shrubs at places selected by one of our land- 
scape gardeners, Corporal Dalton of Battery B. This 
added to the appearance of our regimental camp and we 
had always shrub and flower beds while we were at 
Camp Shelby. The line officers' tents and the quarters 
of the field officers were all laid out uniformly and kept 
scrupulously neat. 

One morning, after we had been in camp about ten 
days. General Lewis, in riding through, remarked that 
our camp looked like we had been there two months. I 
replied that we hoped to be in France in two months. 

About this time Captain Stout, I think it was, brought 
word from Camp Headquarters, where he Vv^as every day 
arranging for our equipment, that Indiana was in bad 
with the administration — that our state had repudiated 
the administration in the last election and we had no 
favors coming. I felt that this would not bother us much 
as long as we had General Lewis as Commanding General. 



THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 33 

All we wanted was an opportunity and under such an 
officer a square deal for everyone was assured. Further- 
more, I felt then that the War Department was looking 
for efficiency and could not play favorites in the conduct 
of the war. 

There had been sent to the Division over one hundred 
Reserve Officers, Second Lieutenants, just commissioned 
from the first training camp for assignment to the units 
of the division. Sixteen of these young men were sent 
to us. They had had some brief training in artillery and 
knew more of the technique than any of us at this time. 
In the Regimental Schools which we organized for 
Artillery instruction, the instructors were mostly all 
selected from these young gentlemen. Unfortunately, 
in the training camp they had been led to have an unfavor- 
able impression of the National Guard and for a long time 
many of them were dissatisfied with their assignment 
to a National Guard regiment. 

This feeling on the part of the Reserve Officers, I 
subsequently learned was very general throughout the 
army at that time and it is deplorable that it should have 
ever occured. It was the result of a propaganda to dis- 
credit the National Guard which in the end utterly failed. 

I personally took up with General Lewis the request 
of these Reserve Officers for an assignment to a National 
Army Division, explained their feelings and views, and 
expressed a hope that it might be possible to arrange a 
transfer. The War Department declined to make any 
change in the assignments. 

I am very glad to state that, with a few exceptions, 
all the young Reserve Officers we received from the train- 
ing camp made good. 




MAJOR JAY A. UMPLEBY 



THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 35 

The first horses we drew were a rather rangy-looking 
bunch of cavalry horses. Stable Sergeant Arnold had 
them on the picket line grooming them when Captain Stout 
told me of their arrival. Accompanied by Captain Cobler 
and the Chaplain I went down to look them over. Captain 
Cobler was our best judge of horses, and when he selected 
one, I suggested that he exchange with the Chaplain for 
one that he had picked out. They did so, the Chaplain 
saying that he had the better of the trade. I drew a 
dark brown horse that proved to be an inveterate 
stumbler. He stumbled on all occasions and could never 
be broken of this. 

That afternoon being Saturday, Captains Chenoweth 
and Cobler, the Chaplain and I went for a ride. We 
started east over the partially cleared field to the road. 
After going less than a hundred yards the Chaplain's 
horse began to buck. I have never seen a horse in a 
wild west show put on a better exhibition of continuous 
bucking. The Chaplain and Captain Cobler swapped horses 
again, and upon adjusting the bit the bucking ceased. 
The Chaplain, for a long time, felt that something had 
been put over on him on the original trade, but I 
insisted that I had Captain Cobler take the sorrel because 
it went well with the Captain's hair, but this explanation 
didn't satisfy the Chaplain completely. 

Major Umpleby wrote to me from Fort Sill that word 
had been received there from the Chief of Field Artillery 
that all heavy regiments in the National Guard Divisions 
were to be motorized in entire, in all equipment except 
some mules for the Supply Company, and not to spend 
any time on equitation. I took this up with the Brigade 
Commander but he had no information or orders. 

A little later the Construction Quartermaster, Captain 
Steele, called and asked me to locate our stables, saying 



36 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

that he had instructions to build stables for fifteen hun- 
dred heavy artillery horses that were to be issued to us. 
I told him I had word, unofficially, we were to be motor- 
ized. This matter was taken up with the Division Chief- 
of-Staff, but confirmation could not be obtained. The 
ground was cleared of stumps, and the stables were built. 
After a while we received in lots, at various time, about 
five hundred heavy artillery horses. We went to work in 
real earnest on equitation. Captain Cobler was detailed 
in charge of the instruction. Five ''bull rings" were 
laid out, and every man in the regiment who knew anything 
about horses w^as tried out and the best horsemen were 
selected as instructors. All non-commissioned officers and 
drivers were given a course in blanket and surcingles — 
except we had no surcingles and only a few blankets — so 
it was bareback with halters from morning till night, in 
relays. It was hard on uniforms and on some of the men. 
The surgeons of the regimental infirmary had some real 
practice in treating sprains and bruises and several cases 
of fractures, but no one was seriously injured. 

The Regimental Veterinarian, with competent assistants, 
gave daily instruction on the care of horses and treat- 
ment of diseases. A converted infantry regiment had 
determined to know all it could about horses if it was to 
be mounted. As the men progressed, riding included 
hurdles; instruction in driving pairs and draft was taken 
up. The course in equitation was going on nicely and 
everyone was interested in the horses, when official word 
came to the Division that the heavy regiment was to be 
motorized. 

Immediately we organized and established a Regimental 
Motor School for the instruction of motor and tractor 
mechanics and drivers. Lieutenant Kreber, in civil life 
a motor constructor and engineer, was placed in charge 



THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 37 

of the school and had assigned as assistant some excellent 
motor mechanics from the batteries. This school turned 
out many well instructed and qualified mechanics and 
drivers. 

These were busy days. As a heavy artillery regiment 
at that time we were armed with rifles, first with the 
1903 model Springfield. A great deal of our training 
for a long time was in close order infantry drill, squad 
drill, manual of arms and marching in line and in column. 
Due to lack of any material whatsoever, much of the 
time allotted in the training schedule for artillery instruc- 
tion could not be carried out, and in its place other drills 
that we could do were necessarily substituted. This con- 
tinued for months and resulted in the regiment becoming 
exceedingly well-trained in the school of the soldier and 
all dismounted drill. 

The regimental drill schedules were prepared following 
the outline of a training schedule issued weekly by the 
War Department. Much thought was given to its prepar- 
ation. Owing to lack of material and also training on 
the part of the oflficers of the Regiment in artillery tech- 
nique, it was difficult to vary the schedule as much as 
we liked, but the schedule was changed and every effort 
was made to keep it interesting and "make it snappy." 

SCHEDULE FOR WEEK OCTOBER 8-14, 1917 

MONDAY— 8:45 to 10:15 a. m.— Sema- 

7:20 to 8:30 a. m. — School of phore Setting-up. 

Soldier. 10:30 to 12:00 m.— Stables and 

8:45 to 10:15 a. m. — Sema- Groom. 

phore Setting-up. 1:30 to 3:00 p. m.— School of 

10:30 to 12:00 m. — Hippology. Cannonper. 

1:30 to 3:00 p. m. — Organiza- 3:15 to 4:45 p. m. — School of 

tion. Soldier Recruit. 

3:15 to 4:45 p. m.— School of WEDNESDAY— 

Soldier Recruit. 7:20 to 8:30 a. m.— School of 

TUESDAY— Squad. 

7:20 to 8:30 a. m.— School of 8:45 to 10:15 a. m.— Sema- 

Soldier. phore Setting-up. 



38 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

10:30 to 12:00 m.— Nomencla- FRIDAY— 

ture and Care of the Rifle. 7:20 to 8:30 a. m.— School of 

1:30 to 3:00 p. m. — Manual of Squad (manual of arms). 

Arms. 8:45 to 10:15 a. m. — Semaphore 

3:15 to 4:45 p. m. — Preliminary Setting-up. 

Exercises of Gun Squad. 10:30 to 12:00 m.— First Aid. 

THURSDAY— 

7:20 to 8:30 a. m.— School of 1:30 to 3:00 p. m.— Gas Defence. 

Squad (manual of arms). 
8:45 to 10:15 a. m.— Semaphore 3:15 to 4:45 p. m.— Rifle Sight- 
Setting-up. ing. 
10:30 to 12:00 m.— Guard Duty. SATURDAY— 
1:30 to 3:00 p. m.— School of Can- 7:20 to 8:30 a. m.— School of 

noneer. Squad (manual of arms). 

3:15 to 4:45 p. m.— Rifle Sight- 8:45 to 10:15 a. m.— Semaphore 

ing. Setting-up. 

10:30 to 12:00 m.— Guard Duty. 

For defense primarily against aircraft each battery had 
two machine guns. To properly instruct in the use of 
machine guns, I arranged that selected noncommissioned 
officers from each battery should attend the Division 
machine gun school. After these noncommissioned officers 
had been instructed, a regimental school with the graduates 
of the Division school as instructors was established for 
the instruction of a section of each battery in the operation 
and use of machine guns. The Lewis gun was used in 
America but in France we had the Vickers. 

When it became apparent that we could not expect to 
get even one six-inch howitzer for training purposes, I 
called together several good battery mechanics and sug- 
gested that they construct from the drawings in the hand- 
book of the six-inch howitzer, a wooden model. Arrange- 
ments were made with a machine shop in Hattiesburg and 
Mechanic Layton of Battery F, and Assistant-Bandmaster 
Smith began the construction of the dummy howitzer. 
This was finally completed in the latter part of December. 
This dummy howitzer attracted much interest and favor- 
able comment from various Field Artillery Inspectors. It 
was used by every batterj^ in the training course, and 
served its purpose as well as could be expected. 



CHAPTER VI 

School at the 4th Field Artillery 

In addition to the 38th Division, a regular Artillery 
Brigade, composed of the 4th, the 75th and 76th F. A., 
was at Camp Shelby at this time. The 4th F. A. was 
Mountain Artillery, equipped with 75-mm. mountain 
howitzers. The 75th and 76th were converted cavalry 
regiments partially armed with 3-inch guns. General 
Whitney arranged with the War Department to organize 
a school for elementary artillery instruction for the 63rd 
F. A. Brigade, to be conducted by the officers of the 
4th F. A. 

The course was three weeks for the officers and an 
indeterminate length of time for the non-commissioned 
officers and specialists. Major Rogers, Commanding 
Officer of the 4th F. A., was Commandant of the school. 

Owing to the lack of field officers in our Regiment, the 
Regimental Commander and Major Unversaw being the 
only ones with the Regiment at this time, 1 was obliged 
to perform my regular duties with the Regiment in 
addition to the rather strenuous course at the school. This 
was also true of a number of our officers who were 
attending this school in the same section. We had no 
time for study. 

The course included 3-inch material, standing gun drill, 
instruction of battery details, computing firing data and 
observation of fire. Some of the instruction was excellent, 
but the less w^e say about part of it the better perhaps 
for all. A provisional Second Lieutenant Bomono of the 
4th F. A. was instructor in Equitation and mounted drill. 



40 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

From this officer's name was coined, in our Regiment, a 
word "Bomonoing," which means "treat 'em rough." 

As far as I could determine the course in equitation 
was conducted to see whether we could stand the gaff. 
Most of us had sorry, or at least indifferent, mounts, and 
the head-long rides over rough ground, logs and stumps 
and through woods was not my idea of teaching horse- 
manship. That so few men and horses were hurt in this 
test of nerves was pure good luck. 

To conduct mounted gun drill at a full gallop over logs, 
stumps and thick under-brush may be spectacular, but 
is of little benefit to anyone. 

I recall a caisson upon which Major Unversaw and 
Captain Cobler were riding, while being driven at a 
gallop over stumps, overturning, and throwing both of 
the officers ten feet, just missing another stump in their 
fall, which would have certainly caused them severe 
injury if they had struck it. 

Grooming by detail — When it came to cleaning the 
left hind foot the mule that I drew wouldn't play. I 
didn't insist after finding out for myself that he could 
drop-kick goal every time. One of the instructors, one 
morning saw me pass the mule's left hind foot, asked 
why, and offered to show me how to clean it. When the 
instructor gathered himself together, he was somewhere 
in the mud in the rear of the picket line. This mule 
was said to have a bad disposition. Just before this I had 
had a hard fall from my horse, the quarter strap of the 
saddle breaking as I was jumping hurdles and I was still 
very sore and stiff, and continued so for some weeks. 

We were all much interested in the observation of fire. 
The first service firing of howitzers I had ever seen was 
the firing of these mountain howitzers. I was dis- 



SCHOOL AT THE 4TH FIELD ARTILLERY 41 

appointed in their apparent lack of accuracy, and I have 
not yet been able to determine whether it was due to the 
material or the errors of the personnel. Whenever I saw 
these little guns mounted on the backs of the mules, they 
brought to my mind Kipling's ''Screw Guns," which 
everj' artilleryman should know. 

Screw Guns 

Smokin' my pipe on the mountings, sniffin' the momin'- 
cool, 

I walks in my old brown gaiters along o' my old brown 
mule. 

With seventy gunners be'ind me, an' never a beggar for- 
gets 

It's only the pick o' the Army that handles the dear little 
pets— Tss! Tss! 

For you all love the screw-guns — the screw-guns they 

all love you. 
So when we call round with a few guns, o' course you 

will know what to do — hoo! hoo! 
Jest send in your Chief an' surrender — it's worse if 

you fights or you runs: 
You can go where you please, you can skid up the 

trees, but you don't get away from the guns. 

They send us along where the roads are, but mostly we 

goes where they aint; 
We'd climb up the side of a sign-board an' trust to the 

stick o' the paint; 
We've chivied the Naga an' Lushai, we've give the Afree- 

deeman fits, 
For we fancies ourselves at two thousand, we guns that 

are built in two bits — Tss! Tss! 

For you all love the screw-guns — 

4 



42 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

If a man doesn't work, why, we drills 'im an' teaches 'im 

'ow to be'ave; 
If a beggar can't march, why, we kills 'im an' rattles 'im 

into 'is grave. 
You've got to stand up to our business an' spring without 

snatchin' or fuss. 
D'you say that you sweat with the field-guns? By God, 

you must lather with us — Tss! Tss! 
For you all love the screw-guns — 

The eagles is screamin' around us, the river's a-moanin' 

below. 
We're clear o' the pine an' the oak-scrub, we're out on 

the rocks an' the snow. 
An' the wind is as thin as a whip-lash what carries away 

to the plains 
The rattle an' stamp o' the lead-mules — the jinglety-jink 

o' the chains — Tss! Tss! 

For you all love the screw-guns — 

There's a wheel on the Horns o' the Mornin' an' a wheel 

on the edge o' the Pit, 
An' a drop into nothin* beneath us as straight as a beggar 

can spit; 
With the sweat runnin' out o' your shirt sleeves an' the 

sun off the snow in your face. 
An' 'arf o' the men on the drag-ropes to hold the old gun 

in 'er place — Tss! Tss! 

For you all love the screw-guns — 

Smokin' my pipe on the mountings, sniffin' the mornin '- 

cool, 
I climbs in my old brown gaiters along o' my old brown 

mule. 



SCHOOL AT THE 4TH FIELD ARTILLERY 43 

The monkey can say what our road was — the wild-goat 'e 

knows where we passed. 
Stand easy, you long-eared old darlin's! Out drag-ropes! 

With shrapnel! Hold fast!— Tss! Tss! 

For you all love the screw-guns — the screw-guns they 

all love you! 
So when we take tea with a few guns, o' course you 

will know what to do — hoo ! hoo ! 
Just send in your Chief and surrender — it's worse if 

you fights or you runs: 
You may hide in the caves, they'll be only your 

graves, but you don't get away from the guns! 




MAJOR N. A. GARY, M. C. 



CHAPTER VII 

The Winter of 1917-1918 

The first inspection of the regiment was made by 
Colonel Starbird, Inspector General of Field Artillery. He 
came unannounced, to the Adjutant's office, called for our 
drill schedule and checked up the several batteries in their 
work in following out the prescribed schedule. I was at 
that time at the Fourth Field Artillery School and did 
not see him that day. The next afternoon he came again ; 
I met and accompanied him. The drill schedule provided 
that Battery F should be at semaphore practice. The 
battery which had just come in from dismounted drill 
(infantry) had overrun its time and the Lieutenant in 
command left the Battery in quarters, proposing to "cut" 
semaphore was found sitting in his quarters reading a 
newspaper. This was clearly a case for disciplinary action. 

Leaving F Battery we went to the Supply Warehouse 
where several unserviceable rifles were found. The Camp 
Ordnance Officer had, I was subsequently informed, 
requested our Supply Officer to keep them until spare 
parts could be furnished and the rifles would be repaired. 
This was also irregular and could not be explained at 
the time. From thence we went through one of the 
Battery Streets just as the Battery was dismissed, every 
man running and scampering in the chill air to his 
quarters. The non-commissioned officers of this Battery 
were at that time all attending school at the 4th Field 
Artillery and not a man observed the Inspector or the 
Regimental Commander in the Battery Street or called 
attention. 



46 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Everything was breaking wrong and I felt relieved 
when Colonel Starbird told me that he would inspect the 
rifles and equipment the next morning. 

When we were issued the rifles, turned over to us by 
the 3rd Indiana Infantry, I directed Captain Stout to 
retain for the Supply Company all rusty, broken and 
unserviceable rifles so that he would have them in his 
possession and could turn them over to the Camp Ord- 
nance Officer whenever a supply of new rifles were avail- 
able for issue in exchange. 

The unserviceable rifles would answer every purpose in 
instruction in the Manual of Arms. That evening I 
instructed the Battery Commanders to personally inspect 
every rifle and see that they were clean. The Supply 
Company had a real job to clean their old rifles for the 
inspection. 

Colonel Starbird started his inspection the next morn- 
ing with the Supply Company. He was looking for dirty 
rifles, but I was much pleased that he found only a very 
few dirty ones, these few belonging to men who had been 
away on duty and their rifles had not been cleaned. This 
never happened again. 

The weather in October and in November until nearly 
Thanksgiving was moderate and the lack of wool clothing 
and heavy underclothing, while causing some discomfort, 
did not cause any suffering. About the first of December, 
1917, the weather turned cold and the temperature at 
night fell to as low as 15 above zero. We did everything 
we could to hasten our requisition for wool uniforms, 
overcoats and heavy underwear, but without avail. 

An inspection of the Division by an Inspector General 
from the War Department occurred early in December, 
and on the evening of the 9th I received orders to be 
prepared for a full inspection with shelter tents pitched 



THE WINTER OF 1917-1918 47 

at 8:00 A. M., the morning of the 10th. We had no 
shelter tents. Most of the men had but one cotton uni- 
form; these were scrubbed in the mess halls after supper 
and dried in the kitchen that night by reliefs keeping a 
hot fire going all night and with the exception of a very- 
few who could not, on account of duty, clean their uni- 
forms, the regiment had clean uniforms the next morning.- 
At 7:30 A. M., the morning of the 10th, the thermometer 
in front of the Adjutant's office registered 15 degrees 
above zero. The batteries were ordered assembled with 
barrack bags, and under arms, in the mess halls. 

The Inspector arrived at my quarters at 7:45. I m6t 
him and asked him to come in out of the cold. He asked 
me why the Regiment was not formed and why I had on 
cotton and w^as without an overcoat. I answered the 
last question first — that the officers of the Regiment 
wore always the same uniform as the men while on duty 
with them; that the Regiment would not be formed for 
inspection until the moment arrived as we had no over- 
coats and only cotton khaki uniforms — that only last 
night was heavy underwear issued— and that in an unus- 
ual and strange way — that we who had been clamoring 
for heavy underwear, were suddenly called upon by the 
Camp Quartermaster to please come and get our issue. 
We drew underwear nearly all night. The Inspector told 
me that he had heard yesterday that some of the units 
had not been issued wool uniforms and heavy underwear 
and had taken this up with the Quartermaster. I further 
was informed that several regiments had been issued 
two 0. D. woolen uniforms per man and that the Inspector 
had ordered one of the uniforms taken up and issued to 
troops without wool. I assured him that the regiments 
so favored were not from Indiana. ^■ 

The Regiment passed a very creditable inspection, in 



48 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

spite of the fact it was so cold that some of the men 
dropped their rifles from their numb hands. The In- 
spector saw to it that the issue of O. D. wool uniforms 
was promptly made to us. 

I took long chances in not having the Regiment formed 
for inspection when the Inspector arrived, as prescribed 
in the order. 

The Inspector was an ofl^cer of judgment and imme- 
diately saw that the sensible thing to do was what had 
been done — to keep troops clothed only in cotton under 
shelter except while actually undergoing inspection. Tent 
stoves had been issued for every tent. The fuel was pine 
from the abundant natural supply. The pitch and resin 
quickly filled up the screen spark arrester on the top of the 
stovepipe, and to keep from being smoked out of the tents 
some of the men would remove the spark arrester. After 
several tents had been burned this practice was stopped. It 
was difficult to keep the spark arresters from becoming 
stopped up. 

Another matter that caused much trouble was the tight 
closing of the tents at night to keep warm, thus shutting 
off all ventilation in the then crowded tents. Our regi- 
mental camp guards inspected the tents every hour dur- 
ing the night to prevent this and enforce the sanitary 
regulation as to ventilation. 

In the latter part of December I received orders to 
report on January 1st to the Commandant of the Brigade 
and Field Officers School at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. 
Three colonels and two lieutenant-colonels from the 38th 
Division were selected to attend this school. I left Hatties- 
burg on the 30th of December and did not return to the 
Division until May. After completing the course for Field 
Artillery Officers at Fort Sam Houston I was ordered to 
the School of Fire, Field Artillery, Fort Sill, Oklahoma, 



THE WINTER OF 1917-J918 49 

and upon completion of this course, returned to Camp 
Shelby, after an absence of four months. 

During this period. Lieutenant Colonel Cleveland C. 
Lansing, formerly captain in the 4th United States F. A.^ 
and later lieutenant colonel of trains in the 27th Division, 
(N. Y. N. G.), was transferred to the 38th Division, and 
assigned to the 139th Field Artillery. 

In February, the Regiment was ordered to the rifle 
range for a six weeks' course of instruction in small arms 
firing. Again it is to the credit of the heavy artillery 
regiment that it led all the infantry regiments in range 
firing, making the highest figure of merit in rifle practice 
of any regiment in Camp Shelby. 




CAPTAIN ERNST E. CHENOWETH 
Adjutant 139th F. A. in America 



CHAPIER VIII 

The Summer of 1918 

Upon my return from Fort Sill, I found that General 
Whitney had been relieved from command of the Artillery 
Brigade which was then commanded by Colonel W. A. 
Colston, 138th F. A., of Kentucky — the senior Colonel 
of Field Artillery. 

In this connection I wish to say that I have found 
Colonel Colston to be an exceedingly lovable man and a 
man of great ability. My relations with him have been 
most cordial and I am glad to count him as one of the 
good friends I acquired in the service. 

Major Henry H. Denhart was then in command of the 
139th F. A. The morning following my return Major 
Denhart and the officers marched the Regiment to my 
quarters and here the officers and men through the Chap- 
lain expressed their satisfaction over my return to the 
Regiment after four months' absence at school. I was 
so touched by this that I could harlly find any voice to 
thank them for their good feeling toward me — but assured 
them that by my earnest endeavor to serve the Regiment 
better by the training in the elements of artillery tech- 
nique which I had received and acquired I would try and 
hope to continue to hold their good opinion — that my every 
endeavor would be to serve the regiment to the best of 
my ability at all times. 

In the afternoon I called upon Brigadier General 
Judson who was then in command of the Division. In his 
youth, General Judson had lived in Indianapolis and I had 



52 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

long known of him by repute as an able engineer. I found 
him to be a real soldier and a very pleasant gentleman. 

About the middle of May we received orders to prepare 
the Division for movement to a port of embarkation for 
overseas service. We were all aglow with the thought of 
early overseas service — but something intervened and 
instead of the Division moving as a Division we were 
called upon to furnish six thousand replacement troops. 
The 139th F. A. supplied five hundred. Every man wanted 
to go, and deep was the disappointment of those who 
could not be included in this number. 

Brigadier General Augustin Mclntyre, who had been 
assigned to command the 63rd F. A. Brigade, arrived at 
Camp Shelby and assumed command May 16th. I had 
heard of his splendid reputation as a field artillery officer 
at Fort Sill and was personally greatly pleased to have 
such a capable officer in command of the Brigade. 

His unfailing common sense and splendid judgment, 
together with his long experience in the field artillery, 
made him an ideal Brigade Commander. I am writing 
this a year after having served under him and I believe 
that we had one of the best, if not the best. Brigade Com- 
manders of any artillery brigade in the service. Had our 
Division been fortunate enough to have had extended 
battle service I am sure General Mclntyre would have 
become a Divisional Commander within a short time. He 
was one of the best soldiers I have met with in twenty- 
five years* experience. 

On April 29th, 1918, the Regiment took its first practice 
march, a ten-mile hike to Black Creek, where we pitched 
a shelter tent camp and spent the night. The weather was 
not too warm and this little march broke the monotony 
of the regular training schedule. The picture I have in 
mind of the camp in the open pine forest on the bank of 



THE SUMMER OF 1918 53 

Black Creek with the camp fires burning brightly in the 
evening is one of the most picturesque of our experience 
and is one I think we all will recall with pleasure. The 
next morning we made the return march singing the 
Caisson song to remind ourselves that we were "artillerie." 

Captain Kiplinger with a detachment of Headquarters 
Company mounted, made a reconnaissance march to map 
the roads south of us. Upon his return I was so pleased 
with the report and the map that I secured permission 
from General Mclntyre to take the Regiment on this 
inarch before the weather became too warm. The length 
of the march was sixty-five miles. We left Camp Shelby 
at 1:00 P. M., May 29th, and spent the night at Black 
Creek. The next morning we left at 6:00 A. M. for 
Purvis, reaching this little town about 9:00 A. M. Here 
we spent an hour resting, much to the satisfaction of 
the proprietors of drug stores and refreshment places, 
who did all the business that could be crowded into one 
hour. Subsequently I received an urgent invitation from 
the business men to make a return trip and to visit with 
the Regiment a while. 

From Purvis we marched in the direction of Lumberton, 
halting about four miles out of Purvis at a selected camp 
site where our noon meal was cooking. Our field ranges, 
rations and all equipment were carried in the fleet of 
Nash quads which we had recently received. As soon as 
our meal was over, the cooks and baggage detail packed 
the trucks and immediately moved into the road to the 
next camping place, where they set up the kitchens and 
prepared the next meal having it all ready by the time 
the troops arrived. 

At six o'clock that evening we reached Lumberton, 
entering the town marching at attention with band play- 
ing. All the inhabitants were out to see us and gave us 



54 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

a most hearty and cordial welcome. We had marched 
twenty-two miles that day and not a man had dropped 
out, although one game chap marched through the town 
partially held up by the men on each side of him. The 
men were game clear through. It made my blood tingle 
with pride to see and to know how much pride they had 
in their outfit "to soldier as a soldier should." 

Twenty-two miles on a hot day in Southern Mississippi 
was a creditable undertaking for any regiment and truly 
remarkable without losing a single man from any cause. 

The next day we rested in Lumberton. Our camp site 
was the school house grounds which was partially shaded 
and very pleasant. In the evening we gave a parade in 
line on the main street. The Mayor reviewed the Regiment 
following the parade. He was not used to being mounted 
and I think was a little embarrassed. After the parade 
the ladies served the Regiment with ice cream and cake 
in such liberal quantities that all, I think, had "seconds" 
and perhaps more. 

After that I went with the Chaplain to a musicale given 
by some of the ladies to the officers of the Regiment. 
Everyone here was most kind and cordial to all of us and 
it will always be with pleasant recollections that we will 
recall our stay in Lumberton. 

The next morning reveille at four-thirty and at six we 
had left Lumberton for a twenty-three-mile march to 
Brooklyn. At ten-thirty we halted near a saw mill for 
our noon meal and rested here until two o'clock. Immed- 
iately after dinner the trucks were loaded and dispatched 
to Brooklyn, carrying in addition to the baggage, as many 
men as could be loaded upon them. The trucks were 
instructed to unload at Brooklyn and return at once to 
meet the marching column. The problem that afternoon 



THE SUMMER OF 1918 55 

was to see how quickly we could move the Regiment by 
trucks and marching into Brooklyn. 

When I reached Brooklyn I found that with the 
assumed situation the conditions of the problem had been 
satisfactorily worked out — that by the use of the trucks 
we had placed over a thousand men in position to defend 
the town before it had been attacked in force from Camp 
Shelby. 

Some of the units first to arrive had taken up quarters 
in the town of Brooklyn. After observing the dirty, insan- 
itary conditions of the streets and town I had the Regi- 
ment moved forward about a mile out of the town and 
bivouaced along the road opposite the county agriculture 
school. 

The next. morning (Sunday) we finished the last leg 
of our march, about ten miles into camp. In one of the 
wooded hollows on the road we halted for rest, and here 
the Chaplain — mounted — held divine services. It was an 
exceedingly simple service but most impressive and 
inspiring. 

This march gave us all confidence in our ability to do 
things and taught the men how to care for themselves 
under march conditions. 

Later on when the other regiments of the Brigade and 
Division were taking their required seven-days' road march 
in the hot July sun it was with a great deal of satisfaction 
that we were informed by General Mclntyre that we had 
been credited with seven days road march which we had 
voluntarily taken and would not be required to take the 
march again. If we had received our tractors and equip- 
ment in the States we certainly would have wanted to 
take a practice march with them however. 

In the spring of 1918 we erected a regimental pavilion. 
This structure, which was largely the result of the genius 



56 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

of "Skipper" Bromley, was the center of the regimental 
entertainments. Each week, generally on Friday night, 
a show was given. These were remarkably good, equal 
to many of the vaudeville shows I have seen. 

Our excellent band gave a preliminary concert. The 
celebrated "Rusty Hinge Quartet" from Battery F sang 
until too tired to respond to further encores. Boxing 
bouts by Gus Klenke, Bobbie Lee, Peters and Plummer and 
other celebreties were always welcomed. 

Sometimes we had talent from other regiments in the 
Division, but generally the show was given wholly by men 
of the 139th. The Headquarters Company gave the entire 
program on one occasion — and following that each battery 
in turn gave an entertainment either alone or with some 
numbers from other batteries. 

Bugler Arnold Andrus of the Headquarters Company, 
my personal bugler and orderly, was a wonderful fancy 
dancer. Dressed in girFs costume he always passed on 
the stage as a girl. 

On several occasions "hops" or dances were given in 
the pavilion. Young ladies from Hattiesburg and vicinity, 
chaperoned, came out, and while there was not enough to 
provide partners for all, there were no wall flowers and 
these occasions relieved the monotony of the long, steady 
training. 

In the early summer of 1918 the War Department 
issued instructions to instruct and to encourage the troops 
in training to sing, and instructors for this purpose were 
provided by the War Camp Community Service. 

The men of our Regiment took this up with vim and it 
was a real pleasure to us all. The War Camp Community 
instructor told me that our Regiment was second to none 
in the Division in singing and that it was real enjoyment 
to him to be with us. The favorite songs were : 



THE SUMMER OF 1918 57 

ARTILLERY SONG 

(Caisson Song) 

Then it's hi, hi, hee! 

In the Field Artillery, 
Shout out your numbers loud and strong, 

Where e'er you go, 

You will always know. 
That the caissons are rolling along, 

(Keep them rolling) 
And those Caissons go rolling along. 

OVER THERE 

Over there, over there. 

Send the word, send the word over there — 

That the Yanks are coming, 

The Yanks are coming. 
The drums rum-tuming everywhere. 

So prepare, say prey'r. 

Send the word, send the word to beware — 
We'll be over, we're coming over. 
And we won't come back till it's over, over there. 

'ROUND HER NECK SHE WEARS A TELLER RIBBON 

'Round her neck she wears a yeller ribbon, 
She wears it in the winter and the summer, so they say, 

If you ask her: "Why the decoration?" 
She'll say : "It's fur my lover who is fur, fur, away." 
Fur away! (fur away). Fur away! (fur away). 
If she is milking cows or mowing hay; 

'Round her neck she wears a yeller ribbon. 
She wears it fur her lover who is fur, fur away. 
5 



58 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 



GOOD-BYE BROADWAY, HELLO FRANCE 

Good-bye Broadway, Hello France, we're ten million 

strong, 
Good-bye sweethearts, wives and mothers, it won't take 

us long. 
Don't you worry while we're there, it's for you we're 

fighting, too, 
So good-bye Broadway, Hello France, 
We're going to square our debt to you. 



CHAPTER IX 

The Franco-British Training Mission 

In the last of June there arrived at Camp Shelby, a 
mission of French and British officers who came to this 
country to conduct a course of instruction for the Amer- 
ican divisions in training. The mission was to present the 
latest phases of warfare derived from the experience of 
both the French and British armies on the western front. 
The course included a school for field officers of all arms, 
a practical demonstration of the work of the special arms, 
and tactical problems in attack and defense. Lectures 
were given on the service of transport and supply. The 
problems began with the platoon in action and continued 
progressively until it included the entire Division in 
action. The field officers of the 139th Field Artillery 
attended the lectures of the entire course, including the 
infantry training. Captain Thommy Martin of the Field 
Artillery of the French Army, a member of the mission, 
was special instructor in heavy artillery, and spent con- 
siderable time with our Regiment. His long experience 
with actual warfare on the Western Front made him 
especially valuable to us, and we were very much gratified 
with his interest in our work. 

The Division engaged in maneuvers under the direction 
of the mission, under orders worked out by the Division 
Staff and the mission. The last maneuver was, I was 
informed, the actual reproduction of the susccessful 
engagement of a French division in attack. Our light 
regiments laid down a barrage, and the 139th Field 
Artillery, with its platoon of 4.7 howitzers actually firing, 



60 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

and the other batteries represented by imaginary pieces 
engaged in counter battery work, and in firing by map 
on the designated objectives. Our actual firing was con- 
ducted at from 5,000 yards to the extreme range of the 
howitzers. 

Every problem presented by the mission was carefully 
studied and the greatest interest was displayed in endeav- 
oring to apply the principles of modern warfare, as laid 
down by the mission. The effort of this training was to 
reproduce, as far as possible, the actual service conditions 
on the Western Front, and to cover in America, the 
training which the Divisions which first went overseas 
were obliged to take under direction of French and British 
officers in France. In other words, it was the intention 
to completely prepare the Division for combat in the 
United States, so that it could take its place with the 
trained combat divisions on arrival overseas. 

It is my belief that the 38th Division was exceptionally 
well trained and in all my observation, I did not see any 
better disciplined or better trained infantry than that of 
our own Division. 

The lack of artillery material made it impracticable 
to complete the artillery training in America and it was 
for this reason that all artillery brigades, no matter how 
long they had been in training in the States, were neces- 
sarily obliged to complete their training on the French 
material in the French training area. 

The following operation order, issued by our Brigade 
Commander, is a model of its kind and shows the plan 
and details of the employment of the artillery: 



THE FRANCO-BRITISH TRAINING MISSION 61 

(P-27 c) Hq. 63rd Field Art. Brig. 

SECRET. 28 July, 1918. 

PLAN FOR THE USE OF THE 
ARTILLERY OF THE 38th DIVISION 

1. PLAN OF OPERATION. The mission of the Division is to take 
the enemies' positions, to include Borkum Trench, and consolidate. 

2. The Infantry Zone of Action is prescribed in the General Plan 
of Attack; 

3. The breaching operation will be in two phases: 

(a) To take the enemies' trenches, Bremen, Breslau, Brandenburg 
and Braunsweig in one rush. 

(b) To take Borkum Trench as the normal objective and to con- 
solidate. To do this, support battalion will leap-frog First Battalion. 
The Infantry will be preceded by a barrage during the entire oper- 
ation. There will be an intense bombardment for two hours preceding 
zero hour. 

4. The Artillery Division is organized as follows: 

Eight Battalions of 75-mm. 

Eleven Batteries of 155-mm. Howitzers. 

Three Batteries of 220-mm. Howitzers. 

Four Batteries of 75-mm. Trench Mortars. 

One Battery of 150-mm. Trench Mortars. 
6. For Organization of the Division Artillery Staff, coordinates of 
Command Posts and Battery or Battalion Emplacements, see Appendix 
No. 1. 

6. ARTILLERY ZONE OF ACTION. TRENCH ARTILLERY. The 
entire zone of action of the Infantry Division is distributed among 
the 75-mm. trench mortar batteries. The battery of 15U-mm. trench 
mortars has special obiectives assigned to it. For objectives of trench 
mortars see Plan No. 2. 

The 155-mm. Howitzers have as objectives communicating trenches, 
command posts and enemy redoubt parallel (Borkum Trench), with 
battery emplacements 200 meters in rear, and after attainment of 
normal objective, on enemies' intermediate position. 

The 220 mortars will fire from H minus 2 hours to H plus 24 min- 
utes against Borkum Trench and will then be used for interdiction 
against the enemies' intermediate position. For objectives of 155's 
and 220's see Plan No. 4. 

Two 75-mm. battalions cover the zone of attack of each infantry 
regiment. Sectors of the regiments are indicated on Plan No. 3. For 
initial objectives see Plan No. 5. 

The contingent zone of the Artillery, both light and heavy, extends 
1500 meters to the right and to the left of the Division Sector. 

The Infantry will makke their attack at hour H and will proceed at 
the rate of 100 yards every three minutes until they arrive at Brauns- 
weig Trench, at H plus 45 minutes. They will remain in Braunsweig 
Trench from H plus 45 minutes to H plus 2 hours, when the attack 
will be resumed against the normal objective, Borkum Trench. 

7. The mission of the Artillery is as follows: 

A violent bombardment will commence at H minus two hours, to 
be participated in by all the Artillery, the initial and ultimate objective 
of each artillery unit, together with the time in which fire will be 
delivered on such objectives being shown in Table No. 1. 

Three batteries of 220 Howitzers will fire on redoubts and emplace- 
ments in rear thereof, in Borkum Trench, until H plus 24 minutes 
and thereafter on strong points in first line of intermediate position. 



62 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Rate of fire 14 round per gun per minute. Eleven batteries of 
155-mm. Howitzers will fire on strong points, Howitzer and mortar 
emplacements and communication trenches along Braunsweig Trench 
until H plus 18 min., in the sector of the 75th Brigade and until H 
plus 24 min. in the sector of the 76th Brigade, and upon redoubts and 
ammunition dumps in Borkum Trench and upon battery emplacements 
200 meters in rear thereof, and thereafter on first and second lines 
of the intermediate position, one battery maintaining fire upon the 
junction of the narrow guage railroad at 4274. Rate of fire one round 
per gun per minute. Eight battalions of 75 guns will fire on Bremen 
and Breslau Trenches and machine gun emplacements along Breslau 
Trench at a rate of fire of 2 rounds per minute, until H minus 5 min., 
at which time they will prepare for barrage. 

Four batteries of 75 trench mortars will fire on machine gun 
emplacements and communicating trenches along Breslau Trench, 
rate of fire 5 rounds per minute until H plus 6 min., and thereafter 
go out of action and prepare to join the infantry as soon as practicable. 

One battery of 150 trench mortars will fire on communicating 
trenches along Brandenburg Trench, at the rate of 2 rounds per gun 
per minute, until H plus 6 min., and thereafter go out of action and 
prepare to join the infantry as soon as practicable. 

At the hour H a barrage from all 75-mm. guns will be laid down 
300 meters in front of the departure trench, which will progress at 
the rate of 100 meters every three minutes until it reaches line 200 
meters beyond Braunsweig Trench at H plus 45 min., where it will 
remain fixed until H plus 2 hours. At that moment it will advance 
at the same rate until it is 200 meters beyond Borkum Trench at H 
plus 2 hours, 18 min., where it will remain until further orders. Rate 
of fire during advance will be 4 rounds per gun per minute and while 
the barrage is fixed one round per minute. One battalion in each 
Infantry regiment sector will fire time shrapnel and one battalion 
will fire shell, except that for the fixed barrage beyond Borkum Trench, 
shell only will be used. Barrage Table is appended, marked Plan No. 3. 

8. PLAN FOR OBSERVATION AND LIASON. From the nature of 
the ground, observation will be possible by aeroplane, balloon and 
forward observation officers only. 

9. The Colonels commanding the different sectors assigned to the 
Artillery will be with the Brigade Commander. The Commander of 
the Trench Mortars will be at 3803. For liason with these different 
elements see Plan No. 1. 

A. Mclntyre 
BRIGADIER GENERAL, N. A. 
Cmdg. Artillery, 

38th Division. 

(P-27 c) 

PLAN OF ACTION 

TABLE 1 

38TH DIVISION ARTILLERY PREPARATION FOR ATTACK 

Command — 220 and 155 Howitzers. 
Unit— A-40. Targets — Battery Emplacement 4371, continuous fire 
H— 2 hours to H+24 min; Strong Point, Borkum Trench 4373, 
Strong Point 5067, H+24 min. to 
Unit— B-40. Targets— Battery Emplacement 5276, H — 2 hours to 
H 4- 24 min., Strong Point, Borkum Tr. 5278, Narrow Guage Junc- 
tion 5768, H + 24 min. to 



THE FRANCO-BRITISH TRAINING MISSION 63 



Unit — C-40. Targets — Battery Emplacement 5877^ H — 2 hours to 

H + 24 min., Strong Point Borkum Trench 5879, Strong Point 

6169, H + 24 min. to 
Unit— A-139. Targets Strong Point "C," 4681, H — 2 hours to H -r- 

18 min., Howitzer Emplacement 4679, Communication Trench 4881, 

H -h 18 min. to H + 
Unit— B-139. Targets— Strong Point 4373, H — 2 hours to H + 24 

min., Ammunition Dump 4573, Trench 5061-5463, H + 24 min. to 

H + 
Unit — C-139. Targets— Communication Trench 5676, H — 2 hours 

to H + 24 min., Ammunition Dump 5678, Trench 6564-7063, H -!- 

24 min. 
Unit — D-139. Targets— Command Post d 5181, H — 2 hours to H -|- 

18 min., Command Post g 5382, Trench 5668-6068, H + 18 min. 

to H +. 
Unit— E-139. Targets— Strong Point "1" 5682, H — 2 hours to H -f 

24 min.. Trench Mortars 5883, Strong Point 5984, H + 24 min. 

to H + 30 min., Ammunition Dump 6180, Trench 6168-6867, H + 

30 to H+. 
Unit F-139. Targets— Battery Emplacement 6173, H — 2 hours to 

H 4- 24 min., Trench 6460-6060. H 4- 24 min. to H. 
Unit— A-149. Targets — Battery Emplacement 5168, H — 2 hours to 

H + 24 min., Trench 6067-6464, H -f 24 min. to H +. 
Unit — B-149. Targets Communication Trench 4076, H — 2 hours to 

H -f 18 min.. Command Post 4180. Trench 4764-5067, H + 18 min. 

to H -f . 
Unit— D-149. Targets— Battery Emplacement 5472, H — 2 hours to 

H + 24 min., Trench 6060-7060, H -f 24 min. to H -f-. 
Unit E-149. Targets— Narraw Guage R. R. 5177, H — 2 hours to 

H 4- 18 min.. Ammunition Dump 5177, Trench 5864-6564, H + 18 

min. to H +. 
Unit — F-149. Targets— Battery Emplacement 4172, H — 2 hours to 

H + 24 min., Strong Point 4174. Trench 5363-5864, H + 24 min. 

to H +. 

Command — Western Command 75 's. 
Unit— 1st Battalion-137. Targets Bremen Trench 3890 to 4392, H — 

2 hours to H — 5 min. 
Unit — 2nd Battalion-137. Targets— Breslau Trench 4086 to 4688, 

H — 2 hours to H — 5 min. 
M. G. Emplacements Nos. 5 and 7, Minenwerfer 4186, 4587, 4587, 
Unit— 1st Battalion-138. Bremen Trench 3488 to 3890, H — 2 hours 

to H — 5 min. 
Unit— 2nd Battalion-138. Breslau Trench 3584 to 4086, M. G. Emplace- 
ments Nos. 1, 2 and 3, H — 2 hours to H — 5 min. 

Command — Eastern Command 75's. 
Unit— 1st Battalion- 147. Targets— Bremen Trench 4993 to 5494, H — 

2 hours to H — 5 min. 
Unit— 2nd Battalion-147. Targets— Breslau Trench 5189 to 5691, 

M. G. Emplacements Nos. 19 and 23, H — 2 hours to H — 5 min. 
Unit — 1st Battalion-148. Target— Bremen Trench 4392, 4993, H — 

2 hours to H — 5 min. 
Unit — 2nd Battalion-148. Targets— Breslau Trench 4688 to 5189, 

M. G. Emplacements No. 14 and 16, H — 2 hours to H — 5 min. 

Command — Trench Artillery. 

Unit— T. M. 75-A. Targets— M. G. Emplacement No. 1 (3584), M. G. 
Emplacement No. 2 (3785), M. G. Emplacement No. 3 (3986), H — 
2 hours to H 6. 



64 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Unit— T. M. 75-R Targets— M. G. Emplacement No. 5 (4187), M. G. 

Emplacement No. 7 (4588), Mlnenwerfer 4186, Minenwerfer 4587, 

H — 2 hours to H 6. 
Unit— T. M. 75-C. Targets— M. G. Emplacement No. 14 (4888), M. G. 

Emplacement No. 16 (5089), Minenwerfer 4186, H — 2 hours to H 6. 
Unit— T. M. 75-D. Targets— M. G. Emplacement No. 19 (5290), M. G. 

Emplacement No. 23 (5491), H — 2 hours to H 6. 

Unit — T. M. 150-lst Platoon. Targets — Communication Trench 3684, 

Brandenburg Trench 3681 to 4384, H— 2 hours to H 6. 
Unit— T. M. 150-2nd Platoon. Targets — Communication Trench 4685, 

Brandenburg Trench 4384 to 5086, H — 2 hours to H 6. 
Unit — T. M. 150-3rd Platoon. Targets — Communication Trench 5787, 
Brandenburg Trench 5086 to 5887, H — 2 hours to H 6. 
Note: This plan is the preliminary, and will be continued throughout 
the bombardment, according to time table, unless conditions 
arise requiring changes. 
(P-27C) 

COMMAND ORGANIZATION AND BATTERY POSITION 

APPENDIX I 

General Mclntyre— C. P. near 2613. 
Heavy and 155 Howitzers — Col. Moorhead — C. P. near 2613. 

220 Howitzers— Major Unversaw— 3 Batteries 40 F. A— C. P. 2732. 
Battery Coordinates— Battery A-2330, Battery B-2729, Battery 
C-3028 
139 F. A.— Lt. Col. Lansing— C. P. 2725. 1st Battalion C. P. 2324, 
2nd Battalion C. P 3327, 3rd Battalion C P 3623 Battery Co- 
ordinates—Battery A-2223, Battery B-2423, Battery C-3225, 
Battery D-3425, Battery E-3522, Battery F-3722. 
149 F. A.— Lt. Col.— C. P. 2325. 1st Battalion C. P. 2219, 2nd 
Battalion C. P., 3rd Battalion C. P. 2621. Battery Coordinates- 
Battery A-2119, Battery B-2219, Battery C, Battery D-2420, Bat- 
tery E-2521, Battery F-2621. 
Western Command of 75-mm. — Col. Colston — C. P. near 2613. 

137 P. A.— Lt Col. Kilmer— C. P. 3.119 1st Battalion C. P. 3018, 2nd 
Battalion C. P. 3319. Battery Coordinates— Battery A-2918, Bat- 
tery B-3018, Battery C-3118, Battery D-3216, Battery E-3317, 
Battery F-3418. 

138 F. A.— Lt. Col. McBryde— C. P. 2518. 1st Battalion C. P. 2317, 
2nd Battalion C. P. 2717 Battery Coordinates— Battery A-2216, 
Battery B-2316, Battery C-2416, Battery D-2616, Battery E-2716, 
Battery F-2816. 

Eastern Command of 75-mm. — Col. Preyermuth — C. P. near 2613. 

147 F. A.— Col.— C. P. 4119. 1st Battalion C. P. 4018, 2nd Battalion 
C. P. 4115. Battery Coordinates— Battery A-3916, Battery B-4016, 
Battery C-4117. Battery D-4013, Battery E-4113, Battery F-4114. 

148 F. A.— Col.— C. P. 3719. 1st Battalion C. P. 3618, 2nd Battalion 
C. P. 3819. Battery Coordinates— Battery A-3517, Battery B-3617, 
Battery C-3717, Battery D-3719, Battery E-3819, Battery F-3918. 

Trench Artillery— Batteries A, B, C and D, 75's— Battery X, 220— 
Capt. Morrison— C. P. 3803. 
Subcommand 75's — Capt. A — C. P. 3999. Battery Coordinates — Bat- 
tery A-3096, Battery B-3498, Battery C-3900, BatteryD-4501. 
Subcommand 220's— Capt. B — C. P. 4097. Platoon i^oordiuates — 1st 
Platoon 3298, 2nd Platoon 3701, 3rd Platoon 4203. 
(P-27 c) 



THE FRANCO-BRITISH TRAINING MISSION 



65 



APPENDIX II 

TABLE NO. 

NUMBER OF ROUNDS OF AMMUNITION REQUIRED 

Eight (8) Battalions of 75-mm. Guns — Total 96 guns. 
Rate of Fire — 

Creeping barrage, 4 rounds per gun per minute. 
Bombardment, 2 rounds per gun per minute. 
Fixed barrage, 1 round per gun per minute. 

Length of Fire 
Two (2) Hours Bombardment 
45 Minutes Creeping Barrage 

75 Minutes Fixed Barrage 

18 Minutes Creeping Barrage 

Two (2) Hours Fixed Barrage 





Shell 


Kind 


Total Shells 


Per Gun 


of Shell 


23040 


240 


Shell 


8640 


90 


Shell 


8640 


90 


Shrapnel 


3600 


38 


Shell 


3600 


37 


Shrapnel 


3456 


36 


Shell 


3456 


36 


Shrapnel 


11520 


120 


Shell 



Totals 



65952 



687 



Shell, 51256. Shrapnel, 15696. 
Eleven (11) Batteries, 155-mm. Guns — Total 44 guns. 

Rate of Fire, 1 round per gun per minute. 6 hours, 18 minutes bom- 
bardment, 14432 total shells, 378 shells per gun. 
Three (3) Batteries 220-mm. Guns— Total 12 guns. 

Rate of Fire 1 round per gun every two (2) minutes. 6 hours, 18 
minutes, bombardment, 2268 total shells, 189 shells per gun. 
Four Batteries of 75-mm. T. M., total of 48 mortars. 
Rate of Fire, 5 rounds per mortar per minute. 2 hours, 6 minutes 
bombardment, 30240 total shells, 630 per gun. 
One Battery of 155-mm. T. M., total of 12 mortars. 

Rate of Fire, 2 rounds per mortar per minute. 2 hours, 9 minutes, 
bombardment. 3096 shells total, 258 shells per mortar. 



CHAPTER X 

The Last Days at Camp Shelby 

Early in August, Major-General Robert L. Howze was 
assigned to, and assumed command of the 38th Division. 
I recall that he had at one time been commandant of the 
Military Academy, and had a reputation throughout the 
army as being perhaps next to General Pershing, the most 
strict disciplinarian among the general officers. Colonel 
Roosevelt in his story of the Rough Riders mentioned Gen- 
eral Howze, then a Captain of the Cavalry, in the most 
glowing terms at the Battle of Santiago. On account of 
these very favorable reports the Division was well satisfied 
to have General Howze in command. 

We felt the War Department had finally decided not to 
keep the Indiana Troops in a training camp during the en- 
tire war. 

Major-General W. H. Sage was originally assigned to the 
command of Camp Shelby, but had been ordered overseas 
just prior to our arrival at Camp Shelby. The Division 
had been successively commanded by Brigadier Generals 
Lewis, Whitney, Judson and Mclntyre. 

In the latter part of December, 1917, we received a bat- 
teiy of 3-inch American Field guns and had them for a few 
days, in which time the officers were instructed daily in 
the standing gun drill and in the laying of the pieces, when 
an order came to turn this material over to the 137th Field 
Artillery. It was not until about the first day of May, that 
we received any further material, when we received two 
pieces of American 4.7 Howitzers together with limbers 
and caissons. 



68 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

In each battery there was instructed a firing battery in 
standing gun drill, but we were unable at this time to do 
any firing for lack of ammunition. There had been allotted 
to our regiment 6,000 rounds of 3-inch shrapnel for range 
firing. The brigade commander authorized the training 
of a 3-inch firing battery in each battery of the regiment. 
This was quickly taken up with a battery of 3-inch Ameri- 
can guns loaned to us by the 137th Field Artillery and 
in a surprisingly short time, a number of good firing 
batteries were trained and range firing started. 

Just as we got under way with the 3-inch material, our 
ammunition arrived for the 4.7 Howitzers, and we com- 
menced our range firing with the Howitzers. It was 
seldom, however, that we were able to use both pieces for 
the reason that there were no spare parts and as some part 
was continually breaking usually one piece was out of 
commission. The replacement of some parts was made 
by the battery mechanics in a Hattiesburg machine shop 
as far as could be. A good deal of our range firing was 
with the pieces placed near Sugar Loaf Hill, firing at 
targets in the vicinity of Lonesome Pine at ranges of 
between 4,000 and 5,000 yards. The firing was by the 
French method and many satisfactory problems were fired 
by our officers. Each battery had trained excellent men, 
and very few errors were due to mistakes of personnel. 
The American 4.7 Howitzer is a simple and accurate 
weapon. For the reason that all F. A. Shell for the 4.7 
howitzers had been condemned as unsafe for firing, all 
of our problems were fired with shrapnel, fuse set to 
burst on impact. 

During the latter half of June and the entire months 
of July and August, we fired daily on the range. Several 
night problems were conducted, but firing these with 
shrapnel bursting on impact, the results were not satis- 



THE LAST DAYS AT CAMP SHELBY 69 

factory as the location of the shot could not be deter- 
mined unless it burst in plain view. 

A system of artillery emplacements, camouflaged and 
deep dugouts for artillery were erected on the combat 
range to the south of the machine gun range. In August, 
each battery in turn spent a night in this artillery position 
which included the firing of night problems, laying by 
compass. The firing batteries of our entire regiment 
were well trained by continuously firing the platoon of 
4.7 howitzers. If we had been able to obtain spare parts 
we could have done twice as much firing for as it was, 
one piece was almost continuously out of order. 

Firing was conducted by lateral observation, bi-lateral 
observation and by observation at the firing battery, and 
by forward observers near the targets. 

In the latter part of August an inspector-general from 
the War Department, Lieutenant-Colonel Marley, I. G. D., 
together with Major Marshall, Field Artillery, made a 
careful inspection of the 63d Field Artillery brigade. 
The following from the report of the inspection relates 
especially to the 139th Field Artillery : 

"1. The following extracts from the report of Lt.-Col. 
James P. Marley, I. G. D., are quoted for your information 
and action under Par. 890 A. R." 

"The discipline of the whole command is considered 
good." 

"The appearance of the 139th Field Artillery good." 

"Camp clean and neat." 
Training 

"Dismounted disciplinary drills and calisthenics in the 
139th F. A. very good." 

"Motor school very good." 

The complete report was read to the assembled officers 



70 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIE1.D ARTILLERY 

of our regiment and we felt happy that there were no 
adverse criticisms or unfavorable comments made on the 
139th Field Artillery. 

In accordance with a time honored custom, I arranged 
for the consecration of our new regimental standards. 
The regiment was again at full strength and the recruits 
were sufficiently instructed to take part in the ceremony. 
For the ceremony the regiment was formed in a hollow 
square. The standard was brought by the ceremony of 
"Escort of the Colors," to center of regiment where it 
was received. Chaplain Brundage assisted by Chaplain 
Finnegan, of the 137th Field Artillery, and the Camp 
Secretary of the Y, M. C. A., invoked the Divine blessing 
upon the cause of the Allies and particularly the men of 
the 139th Field Artillery. I replied that the standards 
would never be dishonored by the men of this regiment. 

General Mclntyre and his staff were present and after 
the ceremony was over he made some complimentary 
remarks about the appearance of the regiment and the 
esprit de corps. 

It is my sincere belief that the regiment was the equal 
to any regiment in the army in discipline and esprit de 
corps and that a better personnel did not exist in this 
or any other army. 



CHAPTER XI 

To THE Port of Embarkation 

On the last day of August, eighteen passenger coaches 
were spotted on the Mississippi Central siding near the 
Quartermaster's depot, and instructions in training the 
Division for departure for the port of embarkation were 
given. This at least served to continue our hopes that 
perhaps some day, some time, w^e would leave Camp 
Shelby. We had been here so long that it was like home 
to us, and to the recruits just received in the Regiment, 
the original men of the 4th Indiana were old timers and 
indeed many of these now claimed to be the original 
settlers of this part of the country. At last a unit of the 
Division entrained for the port of embarkation. The 
engineers were first to get away, then followed the infantry 
and the light regiments. Finally on September 19th, I 
think it was, the heavy regiment was scheduled to depart 
and it was with glad hearts that we marched the last 
time through Camp Shelby and entrained for Camp Mills, 
L. I., N. Y. The first section was routed via Queen & 
Crescent to Knoxville, Southern to Washington and Balti- 
more & Ohio to New York. We had a short delay at 
Bristol, Tennessee, for exercise, and again detrained at 
Washington. At both of these places the Red Cross ladies 
served coffee and refreshments. It was curious to me that 
even though we had just finished a meal on the train, 
should we arrive at a station where the Red Cross was 
furnishing lunches, nearly every man was ready for an- 
other meal, and would eat as heartily as if he had not eaten 
for hours. This must have greatly encouraged the Red 
Cross ladies, and was undoubtedly a sincere mark of 



72 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

appreciation. However, the food furnished by the Red 
Cross was of such excellent quality that I never heard 
of anyone becoming sick from overeating. 

The first section arrived at Garden City, L. I., early 
Sunday morning and detrained for Camp Mills. When we 
reached Camp Mills, we found that the camp was crowded 
and that no quarters were available for us. Instructions 
had been given to the Long Island R. R. to continue 
our train to Camp Upton, Yap Hank, New York, about 
60 miles farther down the island, but someone had 
neglected to transmit these orders to our train crew. And 
knowing nothing of the change in the orders we detrained 
at Garden City. The morning was spent in looking about 
the town. In the afternoon, a train was made up which 
took us to Camp Upton. The remainder of the Regiment 
arrived during the night and we were comfortably 
quartered in the barracks formerly used by the artillery 
of the 77th Division. 

Influenza was prevalent in this camp, and we were 
quarantined against the rest of the camp. A limited 
number of passes were given to visit New York, but 
owing to the prevalence of the "flu," these were finally 
cut ofl^. 

Here we were outfitted for overseas, drew our helmets, 
overseas caps, hobs, spiral puttees and new uniforms. 
The Supply Company necessarily came in contact with 
the Quartermaster's details and others and it was in the 
Supply Company that the "flu*' first appeared in our 
Regiment. After -we had been inspected for equipment 
and passed for overseas, the Regiment attempted a march 
to the sea. We were informed that the secretary of the 
Y. M. C. A. was familiar with the country hereabouts 
and that he would undertake to act as guide to the Regi- 



TO THE PORT OF EMBARKATION 73 

ment. While I did not go on this march, I am informed 
that after marching nearly all day, the Regiment returned 
to Camp Upton, saying that the sea was evidently not in 
the direction in which they marched. As the Regiment 
returned in the evening I wanted an officer who had 
called on me to see the men march past, and stepped 
on the porch in front of my quarters with him to see 
them pass. They were singing an improvised song, which 
had for its refrain — 

"And the d d old sea. 

It ain't where it ought to be." 

Each unit came to attention as it passed, but resumed 
the song later. 

More than fifty men were taken down with the flu and 
sent to the camp hospital. The hospital at this time had 
thousands of cases of flu and was greatly overcrowded. 
I arranged that our own surgeons should visit and attend 
our sick and in this way they received the best of med- 
ical attention. 

The day before we embarked on the transport, our 
surgeons personally saw every man of the 139th in the 
hospitals, and caused to be returned to the regiment 
all who had sufficiently convalesced. Everything was done 
by our surgeons that could be done to look after the 
welfare of our men here, and as far as I have been 
able to learn, all of the men but one transferred to the 
hospital here recovered. Most of our men were in 
splendid condition and physique from the long training, 
and I believe this accounts for their recovery. 

The Y. M. C. A. building in our area at Camp Upton, 

was one of the most complete and well-equipped army 

Y. M. C. A's. that we had seen. In the evenings, the 

reading rooms were always crowded to capacity by our 

6 



74 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

men, while others were playing games in the amusement 
rooms provided. While here, we gave a regimental 
parade, which was viewed with much curiosity by many 
of the soldiers of the National Army then at Camp 
Upton. I learned that parades were unusual here, and 
this was the first one that any of them had ever seen. 
Wellington said: "Troops that parade best fight best," 
and 1 have always felt that there is a great . deal of 
truth in this. 

On October 4th, I received orders to report at 8 o'clock 
the next morning to the commanding general, port of 
embarkation, Hoboken, N. J. Together with our regi- 
mental sergeant, regimental adjutant, and two sergeant- 
majors and a clerk, we left Camp Upton for Hoboken. 

In order to reach Hoboken by 8:00 a. m., it was 
necessary to leave that afternoon for New York. Major 
Cary and I went to Hotel McAlpin and as soon as we 
reached there, I began to feel badly. Major Cary made 
an examination of me and prescribed asperin and quinine, 
the latter in large quantities. 

That evening we went to the Hippodrome, and attend- 
ing also was the crew of a, French cruiser which was in 
New York Harbor at that time. This was the first time 
I had ever been to the Hippodrome and I marvelled at 
the size of the stage which had on it at one time, as 
I recall it, four elephants, eight or ten camels and four 
or five hundred people. 



CHAPTER XII 

On the Atlantic 

To Transport No. New York 242, which was the 
White Star S. S. "Cedric" of H. B. M. S. were assigned 
the 139th F. A., the 2nd Battalion 814th Pioneer Infantry 
(colored) and a Battalion of Ordnance troops, a total of 
3,450 men. Before boarding, I received the following 
order : 

HEADQUARTERS PORT OF EMBARKATION 
Hoboken, New Jersey 
CONFIDENTIAL 

October 3, 1918. 
Special Orders 
Xo. 266 

(Extract) 
*♦*♦** 

3. Colonel Robert L. Moorhead, 139th Field Artillery, senior 
officer in command of troops on board Transport No. N. Y. 242, sailing 
from this Port about October 6, 1918, will, upon boarding the ship, 
assume command of all troops on board. 

****** 

By Command of Brigadier General Judson: 
Official : 

R. E. Longan, 

Colonel, A. G. 

Acting Chief of Staff. 
E. A. Robbins 
Maj. A. G. 
Adjutant 

We were fortunate in being assigned to the "Cedric." 
She was a large ship of over 20,000 tons, and was known 
as a good steady boat. 

The 139th Field Artillery left Camp Upton at daylight, 
on the morning of the sixth of October, via rail for port 
of embarkation. New York, and reached Pier 58, North 
River, about noon. The regiment's papers were in 
excellent condition and the troops were loaded immed- 
iately, and without delay, each battery was assigned to 
its quarters and berthing space. The Embarkation Officer 



76 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

complimented Captain Coston, our personnel adjutant, on 
the condition of the regiment's service records and pas- 
senger lists, saying that he did not find a single mistake, 
and the papers were the best that he had ever seen. 

The other two organizations were very slow in loading. 
They either did not have any papers at all or what they 
did have were incomplete. The chief officer of the Cedric 
informed me, we were so slow in loading that we would 
delay the convoy which was to assemble that night at 
Graves End, L. I. I referred him to Lieutenant Colonel 
McNeely, Infantry, of the Port's Embarkation Staff, who 
was then on our transport. I knew Colonel McNeely in 
former years as Captain of Infantry stationed at Fort 
Benjamin Harrison. He said that he was in a quandery, 
that some of the units loading were without service 
records and passenger lists, and that he would be obliged 
to send his personnel officer overseas to make up their 
records, and that he couldn't spare the officer. I told 
Colonel McNeely that we had good men in every battery 
that could instruct and help make out these records, and 
if he would turn over to Captain Coston, the instructions, 
we would take care of it for him. This he did. The 
records and papers were all ready when we reached 
Liverpool. 

The battalion of Pioneer Infantry was made up of 
colored men from the South, principally from the farms, 
and it was of course, the first trip to the ocean for nearly 
all of them. It is related that when the battalion embarked 
on one of the Hudson River ferries to cross to the wharf 
where the Cedric was docked, one colored soldier turned 
to his bunkie and said: "George, this heah France surely 
caint be very far away cause they aint no seats in this 
boat." 



ON THE ATLANTIC 77 

Finally all were loaded and at 4 :40 P. M., with band 
playing and troops cheering, we dropped down the river 
on our way overseas. Nearly every one remained on 
deck until dark watching the entertaining sights, as we 
passed out of the harbor. The Statue of Liberty was the 
most interesting to those who had not seen it before. 

The evening meal that night was the first introduction 
our men had to British cooking, and they did not like 
it very well. A good deal of complaint was made on this 
account: most of it was unfounded, although there were 
genuine instances of justifiable complaint. One officer from 
each battery and company on the transport was at mess 
with his organization at each meal daily and any proper 
complaint was promptly investigated and remedied. I, 
personally, visited the galley and tasted every article of 
cooked food daily. The lack of seasoning and the serving 
of tea instead of coffee were the principle objections to 
the ration. The kitchen help on the British merchant 
marine at this time was very poor and these worthies 
would steal from the rations and sell to the troops, pies, 
steaks and sandwiches at exhorbitant prices. A number 
of these thieves were caught, tried and sentenced. 

As troop commander, I was invited to the S. S. 
Captain's table and in turn invited Major Gary, our 
senior surgeon ; Major Lallinger, commanding officer 814th 
Pioneer Infantry; Captain Foster, commanding officer of 
the Ordnance Battalion, and the troop adjutant, Captain 
McKinney. We had a pleasant and agreeable table. The 
S. S. Captain was seldom at the table except for evening 
dinner, taking his other meals in his quarters on upper 
deck. 

The first duty as soon as the troops were loaded was 
to organize the Troop Headquarters. I designated the 
administrative staff of the 139th F. A. as Troop Staff. 



78 THE STORY OF THE i39TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

A submarine look-out of ninety-eight men, composed 
principally of the excellent non-commissioned officers and 
men of Headquarters Company, 139th F. A., was selected. 
These men were carefully chosen on account of their 
efficiency and reliability, and proved to be a credit to 
themselves and their regiment. 

The other organizations with us had only been in the 
service a month, the men all being drafted within the 
last few weeks, and were untrained, as yet, for first-class 
guard duty, so this also fell upon our men. 

For defensive purposes the Cedric was armed with one 
six-inch naval gun aft, and two six-inch howitzers (for 
discharging depth bombs) located forward, one on the 
port and one on the starboard side. The British Navy 
furnished one gun crew as instructors. We detailed one 
gun squad from each battery to man these pieces. These 
squads were instructed in the operation of the naval guns 
by the British sailors and the guns were constantly 
manned by one of our gun squads, standing the regular 
navy watch — four hours on and eight off. 

A British sergeant-major (corresponding to a first 
sergeant in our service) was detailed to assist the Troop 
Commander in carrying out the routine of the British 
Transport service. This sergeant-major was a good soldier 
and well instructed in his duties. He accompanied me on 
the daily morning inspection of the ship. The weather 
was rough the first few days, and many were sea-sick. 
The negro soldiers, I think, were all sick. One morning, 
in inspecting their berthing space, I saw what appeared 
to be a pack lying under one of the berths. This was 
contrary to regulations as everything was to be kept off 
of the floor. I wasn't quite sure in the dim light that 
it was a pack, and poked under the berth with my electric 
torch : the object was resilient : I poked again and a grunt 



ON THE ATLANTIC 79 

came. "Get up," I said. "Boss, I'se sick." "Get up on 
deck at once!" I said again. "Boss, I'se awful sick." 
"You are in a bad place if the ship was to be torpedoed." 
"Boss, I wish to God, the ship was done torpedoed." I 
believed him. 

After policing quarters and decks at nine in the morn- 
ing, all were required to remain on the weather decks 
until four in the afternoon. The forced ventilation in the 
berthing space kept the air fairly good at night. On 
the weather decks were large galvanized iron cans to 
which hot water and live steam had been piped to wash 
the men's mess gear. Near these were garbage cans into 
which the leftovers from the mess were thrown. A guard 
was placed here to prevent any one wasting food or 
throwing garbage into the wash cans. I saw a colored 
soldier come up to the garbage can and start to throw his 
whole untouched meal away. The guard stopped him. 
He tried to throw it in the wash can, but again the guard 
interfered. The colored boy walked a few paces up the 
weather deck and threw over the rail both his mess pans 
full of food, saying, "Fll nevah have no moh use fo' them." 
He certainly was seasick. 

As soon as we had mess the first morning out, boat- 
drill was held, and thereafter twice each day. The first 
drills were slow and unsatisfactory, but an improvement 
was noticeable in a few days and on the fourth day the 
men were all at their stations in the proper time. 

Our convoy was composed of eleven British ships 
escorted by H. B. M. S. Terror, a second-class cruiser. 
The Cedric followed immediately behind the cruiser; on 
our right was the Adriatic and the Carmania; on our 
left was the Empress of Britain. The ships were all in 
camouflage paint. 

The first two days out we were convoyed by several 



80 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

American destroyers, but at the end of the second day 
they left us, going to Halifax. Thereafter, for more than 
a week, we were under the escort of the British cruiser 
only. The convoy's course was laid out by orders received 
by wireless from the British Admiralty daily. The exact 
location, of German submarines by the British naval 
forces, and the reports to the convoy of clear seas made 
our voyage in mid-ocean comparatively safe. It was 
extremely interesting to see the almost constant inter- 
change of signals between the cruiser and the ships of the 
convoy, by blinkers and flag hoist. 

At night our convoy moved along without a single light 
showing except the flashes of the cruiser's blinkers, which 
were constantly signalling. From my boyhood days when 
I read Captain Marryat's sea stories I have always had 
the highest regard and respect for the British Navy and 
felt with a glow of pride that our American navy was 
with the British, safe-guarding our trip overseas. 

One evening after dinner, an entertainment was given 
in the saloon for the benefit of the British Seamen's Fund 
for orphans and widows. The men of the different outfits 
put on a first-class show. Many of the performers were 
professionals and the performance would have been 
creditable in the best vaudeville houses. One chap, a 
Scotchman, gave an imitation of Harry Lauder that was 
splendid. The saloon was not large enough to accomodate 
one-tenth of our numbers and there was no place that 
we could give an entertainment that all the men could 
attend. 

Several cases of flu occurred among the men of the 
139th F. A. and we had the liveliest apprehension that it 
would spread to the other organizations, which as yet 
had not had any cases. Our fears were realized. Major 
Gary reported to me one evening that the seventy-two beds 



ON THE ATLANTIC 81 

in the ship's hospital were all filled with cases of flu, and 
pneumonia, and that there were some cases that were left 
in the men's quarters that should be removed. 

The officers were all assembled in the saloon and the 
matter stated to them with a request that such number 
of the state rooms be vacated as necessary to accomodate 
the sick. Every officer of our regiment volunteered to 
give up his state room. Several of our officers were sick 
and could not be moved but the necessary rooms were 
vacated to accommodate the sick men. 

Private Ralph W. Fryant of the Supply Company died 
that night, the first death on the transport. He was 
buried at sea the next afternoon at 3:00 o'clock. It was, 
to me, a most touching and impressive funeral, — one I 
think none of us will ever forget. We had a number of 
men very sick with pneumonia. Captain Green told me 
three of our splendid men could not live. I went into 
the pneumonia ward to have a last word with them. 

Here I want to pay a tribute to our Sanitary Detach- 
ment. These few men were constantly on duty, day and 
night, caring for and nursing the sick without any regard 
for themselves. In the pneumonia ward were twenty-four 
dangerously sick men and faithfully looking after them 
were four of the detachment, now with gauze bandages 
for respirators to keep off the infection. 

The medical officers segregated the pneumonia cases in 
one ward and this undoubtedly kept down the number of 
cases. While we had many sick men, our doctors were 
masters of the situation and the comparatively few losses 
we suffered is evidence of their skill and the excellent 
care given the sick by the detachment. While we lost one 
man en voyage, we observed sixty men buried at sea from 



82 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

the transport Adriatic, which was the nearest ship to us 
in the convoy. 

The ship was so crowded with troops that little space 
was available on the decks for drill and exercise. Each 
battery had twenty minutes of physical exercises daily. 
The colored troops were given the use of the deck for 
one hour daily, for instruction in the manual of arms. 
Rifles had just been issued to them before entraining for 
New York, and their first instruction in their use was 
on the transport. The sea was more or less rough the 
entire voyage. Most of the men recovered from sea- 
sickness in four or five days, but a few were sea-sick 
nearly all the way across. 

After investigating the complaints about the food, 
Major Gary came to the conclusion that the frequent eat- 
ing of candy, cracker jack and- cookies sold by the ship's 
canteen was the principal cause of the men's having no 
appetite for the regular meals and recommended the 
closing of the canteen, except for the sale of tobacco and 
cigarettes. This I did and the recovery of the men's 
appetite for the meals was marked — almost marvelous. 

On the tenth day we neared the coast of Ireland. Our 
course was laid to go around the north of Ireland, but 
reports of submarines in that area caused our course to 
be changed and all that day we steamed south. Early in 
the morning we sighted distant smoke and presently, 
above the horizon, the American Battle-ship Squadron, 
cruising off the coast of Ireland, appeared. It was a 
glorious sight. All day we were escorted by the big ships. 
One carried an observation balloon, from which the 
observer was scanning the sea for submarines. The Battle- 
ship fleet accompanied us all day, and at night they drew 
off to the west. Early the next morning there again 
appeared many dots of smoke on the horizon and ahead 



ON THE ATLANTIC 83 

of US came rushing on a fleet of a dozen or more 
destroyers. We were in dangerous waters. Submarines 
had been reported here the day previous. Overhead 
appeared several British naval dirigible balloons — "Silver 
Queens." It was interesting to see them fly swiftly over- 
head and search the waters for hidden dangers, sometimes 
hovering a few moments over a spot and then darting on. 
Presently we saw ahead of us a fleet of trawlers sweeping 
the sea for mines and submarines. The S. S. Captain 
sent word to me that a submarine had been seen just 
ahead of us a few hours before. Our course for the day 
had been zig-zag — straight ahead for two minutes, then 
twenty degrees to the right, then ahead, and then to the 
left. The destroyers were darting and searching every- 
where like dogs hunting a lost scent. 

Before nightfall I was informed that the life-boats 
would be swung free, ready for instant boarding. Our 
lookout was increased, and everyone on duty was 
impressed with the sense of the possible danger. Every- 
one was instructed that night not to undress and not to 
remove the life belts. It was a chilly October night. I 
made a tour of the upper deck at nine-thirty. We were 
in St. George's Channel: to our left was the Irish coast, 
dimly seen in the moonlight, and to our right was the 
coast of England, clearly seen. Returning, I went to the 
pneumonia ward to see our seriously sick. A number were 
very low, it being only a question of a few hours before 
death. Life was being sustained by the draughts of 
brandy given: further than this, we could do nothing. 

A few moments later, I returned to my quarters when 
there was a loud explosion followed almost immediately 
by a second. The ship shuddered and seemed to grate 
upon something, rose and fell. I immediately started for 
the bridge to report to the captain, as arranged. The sub- 



84 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

marine attack signal was not sounded on the ship's 
siren. It was not necessary. Everyone went quietly and 
promptly, without confusion to his boat station. I reported 
to the chief officer in the absence of the S. S. Captain 
who, I was informed, had gone to the hold to examine the 
ship and ascertain the damage done. The only confusion on 
the ship was caused by the excited kitchen and dining room 
help, some of whom were running to and fro, shouting. 
They had not attended the boat drills and did not know 
where to go in the dark. The chief officer told me that 
was the third time on three successive trips that the ship 
he was on had been torpedoed. 

I waited on the bridge for instructions. The convoying 
destroyers were near us, and occasionally a gun would be 
fired from one of them. The English coast was less than 
a mile distant, and our ship was apparently going as well 
as ever. Nothing unusual occurred to the other ships, 
except the sounding of the siren of the Adriatic, which 
blew immediately after we had our first explosion. Our 
wireless operator told me that the operator from the 
Adriatic had sent out S. 0. S. calls saying our ship had 
been struck. After about twenty- minutes, the S. S. Cap- 
tain telephoned from the engine room that we could make 
port: to dismiss the men to their quarters, instructing 
them to keep dressed, wear life-belts and be ready to 
come deck instantly on call. 

I sent out these instructions and personally went to 
boat number 8, to which I was assigned. Major Cary, 
Captain Coston and thirty-one negro soldiers were also 
assigned to this boat. When I reached the boat, the men 
were still standing at attention. I gave "Rest," and turned 
to Captain Coston to give the instructions. One negro 
soldier turned to his companion, "George, I done told you 
the Captain said it would take three torpedoes to sink 



ON THE ATLANTIC 85 

this heah ship, and only two were fired." He had faith 
in his officer. 

Going below, I went to the hospital. Here I found the 
surgeons and the sanitary detachment quietly on duty 
with the sick : not the slightest apparent fear or confusion. 
Preparations had been made to move those who were too 
sick to walk to the boats, in case of necessity. Again, T 
want to call attention to the splendid character and con- 
duct of the sanitary detachment. 

The next morning at daylight we were safe in the 
Mersey River near the Liverpool docks. The port medical 
officers were first to board. Five of our pneumonia cases 
had died that night. Private John P. Day, Battery C; 
Private John J. Schwartz, Battery E; Waggoner Roscoe 
S. Treece, Battery E; Privates Henderson and Vander- 
veldo, Supply Company. These men were buried with 
military honors, ashore in the soldiers' plot of the hospital 
cemetery. Arrangements were made to transfer our sick 
to the Liverpool hospital and I was handed orders 
directing our regiment to proceed to Codford, Wiltshire, 
England, which was in the Winchester training area. 
We were soon ready to debark, but waited all morning 
for a lighter to take us ashore. Finally when the 
lighter came, about noon, the British naval officer in 
charge of debarkation, said we had better have our 
noon meal before we went ashore. This was arranged, 
and immediately after mess we started debarkation. 

Major Gary reported that Lieutenant Paxton who had 
been very sick with the "flu" was not strong enough to move 
with the regiment. I was sorry to hear this as Lieutenant 
Paxton was one of our best orientation officers and his 
loss would be keenly felt. We hoped that he might even- 
tually rejoin. 




CAPTAIN ROBERT H. McKINLEY 
Adjutant Overseas 



CHAPTER XIII 

England 

Upon landing from the lighter which brought us from 
the S. S. Cedric to the Liverpool docks, we waited on 
the docks for more than an hour for instructions, and 
then were directed to proceed to the station in Liverpool. 
Our guide was an English "Bobby" mounted upon a string- 
halted horse. We soon discovered that all sound and able 
bodied horses in England, as had the men, been requisi- 
tioned for the army. Our march, about a mile and a half, 
was through some of the principal business streets of 
Liverpool. From the windows of every building floated 
American flags, and from ropes stretched across the 
streets from tops of buildings, flew the American colors. 
I do not believe I ever saw the American colors so freely 
and generously used in any city before and it certainly 
gave us a warm feeling toward our British allies. 

The streets were crowded with spectators, mostly 
women, children and wounded soldiers. The absence of 
able-bodied men was noticeable. Women and old men 
were doing the work of the young men. I noticed a num- 
ber of women crying as they watched our young men 
pass, and the thought came to me that they had doubtless 
lost their sons in France. 

When we reached the station we were met by British 
R. T. officers who informed me that the Red Cross had 
hot coffee and sandwiches for all of us. Another officer 
handed me a facsimile reproduction of a letter from King 
George, welcoming us to p]ngland, and stated that he 
had a copy for each man in our command. The British 
officers with whom we came in contact, were nearly all 




WINDSOR CASTLE 



<iC -^^c^ ^^t^^"*^' y/^*^ '-tf-^X>»^^ <^v. "JLO^.^, 




J7^(/u^ /^/s^. 



ENGLAND 89 

officers who had served for several years on the Western 
front, and had been invalided home on account of injuries. 
They were a splendid class, thoroughly informed in their 
duties, efficient and extremely courteous, and their welcome 
to us was warm and genuine. Our Regiment was promptly 
loaded on trains which were waiting in the station. This 
was the first sight we had of the British railroad cars, 
and we were rather amused at the diminutive size of the 
engines and cars, compared to our monster American 
locomotives and equipment. 

Our destination was Codford, Wiltshire, England, about 
200 miles south of Liverpool. The first section left 
promptly and in the several hours of daylight which 
remained, we had an opportunity of seeing something 
of rural England. My impression of the country was that 
it was a finished product. Everything, however, looked 
miniature to us, as compared to the larger scale of 
American farms and buildings. The houses were built 
of brick, with slate roofs, partially covered with vines. 
Hedges instead of fences were the rule. Everything was 
clean, green and picturesque. At dusk a drizzly rain set 
in. About 8:00 o'clock we made a stop at a town where 
we were allowed ten minutes for refreshments at the 
station. The American Red Cross had a coffee station 
here which furnished coffee to all who cared for it. The 
attendants were delightful American women who were 
very cordial in their greeting to us. I bought a few cigars 
at the station and these were the first and last cigars I 
bought in England. They were alleged to be American 
tobacco, very highly praised, but proved to be wretched. 
A good cigar, I was later told, was not to be had in 
England at this time. 

Our route lay through a beautiful country. The rail- 
road bed was splendid. Every culvert was of masonry; 

7 



90 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

the right of way was neat, well kept and free from tin 
cans or refuse in sight, so unlike the right of way and 
vicinity of railroads passing through American towns. 
Nothing could be any better kept than the British rail- 
roads right of way through city, village and country. 

About midnight, we reached the station at Codford, 
where we detrained and marched to the Codford rest 
camp. We were met at the station by an American officer 
and billeting officers who directed the organizations to 
their various barracks. On arriving at my quarters I was 
informed that we were the first American troops to reach 
this camp, and that supper or breakfast, which ever we 
chose to call it, for it was then one o'clock in the morning, 
was ready for us. 

The next morning we received a schedule for the 
routine of the camp which provided, in addition to the 
service calls, for field physical training, and for road 
marches. 

We all had an opportunity while here of seeing some- 
thing of rural England. Here we first saw some German 
prisoners of war, who were doing construction work in 
part of the camp. This camp had formerly been occupied 
by New Zealand troops, but at this time only a small 
contingent remained there. A considerable body of New 
Zealand troops were camped a few miles from us. To the 
west was a camp of Australian artillery, and we could 
hear them at range firing almost continuously. 

The New Zealand troops were strong, husky chaps with 
a peculiarity that they would salute only their own 
officers. Our men were quick to perceive this and promptly 
returned the compliment by failing to note and salute 
New Zealand officers. At first, I was told British soldiers 
were aghast at the refusal of the colonials to salute 
officers other than of their own regiments, and every 



ENGLAND 91 

effort was made to correct this, but finally it was given 
up as a bad job. The statement was made to the men in 
the 139th Field Artillery that the fact that some troops 
had bad manners did not justify ourselves in likewise 
being rude and unmannerly. The New Zealand troops 
boasted that they were the toughest troops in existence, 
and it is related that they made this boast to a certain 
American regiment from a western state that happened 
to be brigaded with them. The Americans, to take the 
colonials down a peg or two, put up an awful effort at 
profanity and general rough stuff, and when it came to 
the attack were so rough that even the New Zealanders 
were surprised. The effect of this rough-house treatment 
upon the Bosche is not stated. 

Codford was a quaint old village which had long been 
used to soldiers. The principal business street of the 
town was lined with small stores and booths which sold 
supplies, trinkets and mementos to the troops. On Sat- 
urday afternoon I took the train to Salisbury to see the 
Salisbury Cathedral, which is considered one of the finest 
in England. The cathedral, begun in 1220 and completed 
about 1260, is a wonderful example of early English 
Pointed Architecture. It is surrounded by a close or walled 
enclosure which enclosed a large space with houses for- 
merly occupied by persons connected with the cathedral. 

Shortly after entering the cathedral I was accosted by 
a gentleman who introduced himself and informed me 
it would give him pleasure to show me through the 
cathedral. He told me that he had been connected with 
the cathedral for many years, and had had the honor of 
conducting President Wilson through the place, when he 
visited there some years ago as president of Princeton 
University. This gentleman was exceedingly courteous 



92 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

and had a thorough knowledge of the cathedral and its 
history. 

I spent several hours with him going through the 
cathedral. There was a number of American soldiers here 
at the time and I felt that we all enjoyed the visit to 
this wonderful place. At dusk I left, and went into the 
town of Salisbury to get supper. I did not have any bread 
or meat ticket and it was only after having been refused 
six places I was able to get a small meal without the 
necessary tickets. Money was no object. The scarcity of 
food was real. American soldiers were not supposed to 
eat outside of their own camps. I had a small meal con- 
sisting of fish, potatoes and tea. 

Salisbury, a town of about 20,000, was in the heart of 
a training area, and in the evening was filled with British 
soldiers on pass. Due to the war measures and precau- 
tions, the streets were totally dark at night, and in the 
stores usually only one or two small electric light bulbs 
were lighted. 

Returning to the station, I took the train to Codford, 
and rode in the same compartment with a party of 
Australian artillery officers. They were sociable and cor- 
dial, very much like western Americans. 

Sunday the Chaplain held services on the parade 
grounds. After his services I had the adjutant announce 
that the Regiment would take a march to some nearby 
villages, giving the men an opportunity to view rural 
England from the road. The Chaplain requested that those 
who preferred to attend with him the village church, 
Codford Saint Mary's, might be excused from the march, 
to which I assented. In all my experience, I never knew 
church to be so popular with soldiers, especially the 
second service in the same morning. About 500 chose 
to attend with the Chaplain the services in a church that 



ENGLAND 93 

had a seating capacity of 200. When the Chaplain marched 
down to the church with his new converts, he sent word 
in to the rector, the Reverend Mr. Denny, that he had 
come to church with some of his men. The rector came 
out on the steps of the church and gave a short talk, after 
which the Chaplain took his converts on a walking trip 
through and beyond the village to view some old ruins. 
I accompanied the remainder of the Regiment on a march 
which included three small villages and through an exceed- 
ingly picturesque country. We all were impressed with 
the neatness and tidiness of everything. The roads were 
kept in excellent repair, the grass on each side of the 
road mowed, no waste paper or refuse of any kind along 
the roads. At intervals of perhaps less than a mile along 
side of the road were small dumps of crushed stone and 
road material which is used in keeping the roads in 
repair. Here were located tool houses with the tools, 
barrows and tar to be used. Old men, incapacitated for 
other work, keep the roads clean and in repair. The 
English roads that I saw were better than any of our 
park boulevards in America, and all of them appeared 
to be this way. 

This march, about eleven miles, was the first one of 
any length our men had taken in their hob-nails, and when 
they returned, they were thoroughly tired from marching 
on the hard paved roads and from the weight of their 
heavy shoes. I wore a pair of light marching shoes and 
came back less fatigued than anyone else, merely on this 
account. After we became accustomed to the hobs, we 
could march all day without noticing the weight of the 
shoes. 

Saturday noon, just as I was going to the officers' mess 
hall, two very charming young ladies stopped me and 
asked where they could find the American officers. They 



94 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

explained to me that they were members of the British 
Red Cross, and that this was their "Tag Day." I intro- 
duced myself and told them the officers were all in the 
mess hall, and asked them to accompany me. The ladies 
were the Misses Denny, daughters of the Rector of the 
Codford-Saint Mary's Church. I explained their mission 
and told the officers that it would cost each one a dollar 
to meet young ladies, and that the dollar was to go to 
the British Red Cross. The British Red Cross, I think, 
netted about $50, and we had two delightful guests for 
dinner. The next day, Sunday afternoon, the Chaplain 
and I received an invitation to call and have tea with the 
Rector at four o'clock. We took with us, each, a dozen 
lumps of sugar in an envelope, as we understood that sugar 
was almost unknown in England at this time. We had 
a most enjoyable time at the Rector's. The house was a 
very old one, part of it over 400 years old, and much of 
the furniture, including some suits of armor, was decidedly 
antique. I noticed over the mantel-piece in the library, 
two swords, and inquired if they were not modern. Mrs. 
Denny, the wife of the Rector, told me that they had 
belonged to their two sons, both of whom had been killed 
in the war, and that these swords had been sent back to 
them from France. In every home, I was told, an almost 
similar story could be related. 

We were the first American soldiers that had been 
here, and people were rather sizing us up. I was very 
glad to feel from the remarks made in our hearing, that 
we were making a good impression. 

Early Monday morning we entrained for Southampton, 
and after two hours' ride detrained at the docks. Here 
on the docks, at Southampton, we were required to remain 
all day. The port order allowed only the Regimental 
Commanders to leave the dock. I went up to the hotel, 



96 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

reported to General Mclntyre, and there met Lieutenant 
Rochfordier of the French army, who was attached to 
our Regiment. We then went to the American Y. M. C. A. 
quarters and asked what was especially interesting 
to see in Southampton, and a very obliging gentleman 
offered to take us to several interesting places. These 
included the old wall, where more than a thousand years 
ago, King Canute is said to have ordered the sea to stay 
back, and to Bar Gate where the Pilgrim Fathers, in 1620, 
met and spent the night before sailing for America on 
the Mayflower, and to the Museum, which is located in 
a very old house and is full of interesting historical relics, 
many of which date back to the Roman occupation of 
Britain. We also visited a number of very old churches. 

Southampton today has a population of above 75,000. 
It is a very ancient town, dating back long before the 
Christian era, and has witnessed much of the interesting 
happenings in history. The town was sacked by the Danes 
in early Anglo-Saxon times. Here it was that Richard 
the Lion-Hearted embarked with the flower of England 
on the Crusade to redeem the Holy Land from the Mussul- 
men and here again it was that the English forces under 
General Allenby sailed nearly a thousand years after for 
the same high purpose. 

Our obliging guide directed us to a restaurant where 
our French lieutenant met one of his countrymen who pro- 
vided us with everything that was good to eat, without 
our having either a bread or meat ticket. We then 
returned to the dock where, in a misguided moment, upon 
advice of British officers, we exchanged our private funds 
from American Bank drafts into a deposit in a British 
bank that had branch offices throughout France. This 
British bank undoubtedly had many branch offices in 
France, but it did not have any in the parts of France 



ENGLAND 97 

we went to and it was not for a long time that we were 
able to realize on our personal funds. 

About 7:00 P. M. we boarded the Channel Packet for 
Cherbourg. The entire Regiment, less Battery F went on 
one packet, and the only reason Battery F was not on 
the packet was that there was not standing room for any 
more men. Those channel packets were in reality serving 
as ferry boats, and the trip was not supposed to be one 
of comfort. During the night coffee was made and served 
with our travel rations before we docked at Cherbourg. 

The trip across the Channel was uneventful. So many 
million soldiers had been transported from England to 
France with such small loss that the trip, owing to the 
precautions taken, might be regarded a very safe one. 




« O 






I '-^ 



CHAPTER XIV 

France 

"Here's to the Blue of the wind-swept North 
When they meet on the fields of France, 
May the spirit of Grant be with you all 
When the sons of the North advance! 

Here's to the Grey of the sun-kissed South 
When they meet on the fields of France, 

May the spirit of Lee be with you all 
When the sons of the South advance! 

And here's to the Blue and the Grey as one 
When they meet on the fields of France! 

May the spirit of God be with us all 
W^hen the sons of the Flag advance." 

Shortly after six o'clock we docked at Cherbourg. The 
morning was cloudy and gray, and harmonized well with 
the old stone buildings of the French naval port. On the 
quays and walls everywhere about the docks was painted 
the word "Defense," which we translated literally. 

An American Lieutenant of the debarkation staff met 
us and directed me to march to a British rest camp near 
Tourville, which, he said, was about five miles from the 
docks. The regiment was quickly debarked, each battery 
guidon being brought ashore, the batteries formed in 
column behind their guidon. With band playing and our 
best foot forward, we marched through Cherbourg. Sol- 
diers — French, English and American — were long a famil- 
iar sight to the people here, but we received many a wave 
and word of welcome. We marched with full pack: every 
article the men possessed was on their backs, including 
the "tin" hats. The total weight of each pack was sixty- 
four pounds. 

This was our first sight of France, and we were taking 



100 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

in everything with our eyes and ears. We made several 
short halts to rest. At each of these the children would 
swarm to the soldiers and say, "Penny, penny," holding 
out their hands for small coins. Women peddling apples 
did a thriving business, and their baskets and carts were 
emptied quickly. The apples they were selling were raised 
in Normandy. When we reached Tourville I was reminded 
by the quaint old Norman buildings of the scenery in 
"The Chimes of Normandie." The Chaplain said it looked 
just like a picture. 

When we arrived at the British Rest Camp at Tour- 
ville, I reported to Lt. Colonel Maul, F. A., U. S. A., who 
was the senior American officer, and was by him intro- 
duced to the British Colonel who, I understood was the 
Camp Commander. Inquiry was made of me as to when 
the rest of the regiment would arrive. I replied that 
Battery F was on another channel transport, which I 
had been informed was damaged in a collision and would 
not be in until night. That was not what was meant by 
the question, but when would the men who arrived that 
morning all be in camp? I said they were all there and 
called for the medical officers, who marched at the rear 
of the column, for verification. Yes, all were in camp. 
There were no stragglers, and none had fallen out. 

According to the statement made to me, we were the 
only outfit that had ever marched out without having a 
number of stragglers. Sometimes, I was told, nearly 
half of the command would fall out, exhausted by loss 
of sleep and from the weight of the heavy packs. We 
were soon assigned to our quarters. I had a small portable 
house covered with roofing paper. The men were quartered 
in tents — just as many to a tent as could lie on the floor 
with no space between. This arrangement had one advan- 
tage — that was warmth on those chill October nights. 






FRANCE ,., , ,,,, , ,,,,, AOX 

The officers had mess at the British Officers' Club. We 
bought tickets each day which provided for four meals, 
the fourth meal being tea and cakes (cookies), served, 
according to the British custom, at 4:00 P. M. 

The American Commander at Cherbourg sent out a 
request to me that I send our band down to the Navy 
Yard that afternoon, that the French Admiral was to 
decorate some sailors and marines and would like to have 
our excellent band, which he had heard playing as we 
marched through town that morning. I replied that the 
band would be delighted to accept the French Admiral's 
invitation if transportation could be arranged. Yes, 
transportation would be furnished and if the band would 
be "gracious enough" to play a concert for the people 
after the ceremony, supper and refreshments would be 
served. Also a car would be sent out for the Commanding 
Officer, who was respectfully invited to witness the cere- 
mony of decoration. 

An American car was sent for me, and with several of 
the officers I witnessed the decoration of the sailors. The 
ceremony took place in a large public space with the 
equestrian statue of Napoleon in the background. The 
sailors and marines were in lines, grouped, I suppose, 
by companies. Those who were to be honored, about 
twelve, were in line to the front and center. Our band 
was on the right. An officer read the citation and award. 
The sailors and troops presented arms, the bugles sounded 
flourishes. The Admiral then began on the right. The 
first award, I was informed, was the Cross of the Legion 
of Honor. In addition to receiving this the sailor was 
kissed on both cheeks by the Admiral. As he passed 
down the line, pinning the decorations on the breasts, he 
later kissed only one cheek. This, I believe, was the Medall 
Militaire. Later he merely shook the hand of the dec- 



1021 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

' ' ' ,'' ' . ^ ' ■ ■ 

orated brie, who I understood received only the Croix de 
Guerre. After this was over, the troops and sailors 
marched in review before the Admiral and the dis- 
tinguished ones who had been decorated for bravery. 
When it was finished, Major Gary remarked that he 
believed he would prefer the Croix de Guerre. 

After the ceremony, I called with Major Gary on the 
American Commander. Then we went to the Hotel de 
France and had our first French meal. It was very good. 
Even the sour red wine was palatable. The next morning, 
at the request of the British Commander, our band played 
a concert at the British Hospital at Chateau Tourville, for 
the entertainment of the sick and wounded British and 
American soldiers there. Captain Donan had been taken 
to the hospital, immediately upon arrival, and was rapidly 
growing worse from pneumonia, which had developed. 
Major Gary and I called to see him and found he was a 
very sick man. It was with heavy hearts that we said 
goodbye, we thought for the last time. 

The hospital was formerly a chateau or castle built 
about three hundred years ago by the celebrated French 
Admiral, Tourville. It was not suitable for a modern 
hospital but was the best building available. The Portu- 
guese had a camp and hospital near Tourville, and it was 
here we first saw our Portuguese allies. 

Orders were received for us to entrain that evening. 
In order to instruct the regiment in a number of things 
that it was necessary that should be taken up at this time, 
I had the entire regiment assembled and briefly took up 
and explained the policy of the War Department, in our 
attitude and relations to our allies, to insure the friend- 
liest feeling toward all individuals, soldiers or civilians, 
with whom we came in contact, and in our relations with 



FRANCE 103 

the civil population we were shortly to be billeted among. 
Hygiene and methods of living were discussed, and above 
all the men were admonished to bear all hardships in a 
cheerful manner. Our agreement was, no matter what 
should happen, we would smile, and like it. Finally, we 
expected to be in France a long time: there was plenty 
of wine, and no one should try to drink all of it in one 
day. Every suggestion that was made was carried out 
by our men and in a manner that was even better than 
was asked. 

Passes to visit Cherbourg were granted only to the 
Regimental Commander and such officers as he desig- 
nated to arrange for rations and transportation. This 
instruction was caused, I was informed by the misconduct 
of soldiers of units that had preceded us there. I went 
to Cherbourg several hours in advance of the regiment 
and, together with Major Cary inspected the cars we 
were to ride in. It was the regulation French Troop Train 
of fifty-two miniature cars, forty-nine small box cars 
marked "8 Chevaux, 32 Hommes," (8 horses, 32 men), 
and three second-class passenger cars, two for the officers 
and one for Regimental non-coms and first sergeants. 
We had a number of men who had very bad colds and 
were not well. We did not want to send these men to a 
hospital as we were changing station and under the cir- 
cumstances we probably would never see them again in 
France. So we designated one of the passenger cars as 
an infirmary, doubled up the officers in one car, and in 
this manner took all men with us who were not ser- 
iously ill. 

To provide my own rations for the trip, I went to the 
British Army Canteen which was established to supply 
officers with food under such circumstances, and laid in 
a supply of package food and "air-tights." All articles 



104 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

were very high in price — a small can of sardines, for 
instance, was ninety cents. The scarcity of food was real. 

Battery F, which had been delayed in reaching Cher- 
bourg, owing to the collision of the Channel transport on 
which it first sailed, arrived in Cherbourg that afternoon 
and was directed out to Tourville, where it had only time 
for a short rest and then marched back to Cherbourg with 
the regiment to entrain for the training area. 

We entrained at 6:00 P. M. and in a few minutes left 
on our first move by rail through France. Our route took 
us within a short distance of Paris, the nearest any of 
us ever came to that city, then west into Brittany through 
Le Mans and Rennes. We rode all night, and at day-break 
we took a siding to allow to pass, a French Hospital train 
just from the front, filled with wounded French soldiers. 
I noticed that many of the cars were gifts of the American 
people, equipped by patriotic, generous American societies. 
The hospital train stopped just across the station from our 
train and some of the wounded were taken out on litters 
for transfer to a local hospital at this point. A dozen 
or more were taken from a car marked ''Hospital, Gift of 
the D. A. R., Kentucky," and laid on the station platform. 
I alighted and tried to speak in French to a wounded 
poilu. He smiled and pointed to the cigarette I held in 
my hand. I quickly took one from my pocket, gave it to 
him and lighted it. The other wounded ones were inter- 
ested spectators and all said, "Merci." My box was 
emptied in no time. I stepped to the nearest car, where 
our men were watching from the "side door" and asked 
for cigarettes. Each man, I think, gave me a package, 
which I distributed among the wounded French. In some 
cases I had to light them as they were too badly wounded 
to move their arms from under the blankets. They were 



FRANCE 105 

SO pleased and grateful for those cigarettes that it was 
almost pathetic. 

Three of the box cars on our train were required for 
baggage and rations, and although these miniature cars 
were supposed to carry only 32 men, I do not believe we 
had less than forty in any car. We were crowded and 
uncomfortable, but not a word of discontent or grumble 
did I hear from a man. It was impossible for the men to 
be comfortable on the trip, but they were good sports and 
laughed at the discomfort. Le Mans was reached about 
noon. We had a rumor that we would get coffee here. 
I inquired at the station and with our interpreter hunted 
up the Chef de Gare who could only tell me that he knew 
nothing of coffee for the American troop trains. I found 
an American R. T. 0. at the station who said that we 
would be furnished coffee somewhere farther along. I 
was further informed that our train would remain here 
about twenty minutes and I could get a lunch at the 
station, which I did. It wasn't very much — French war 
bread, potatoes and black coffee. 

It was not until we arrived at Rennes late in the after- 
noon that we were able to get coffee. Here the French 
had a coffee car which supplied us. I went down to this 
car to see how it was handled. The coffee was poured into 
long tin containers something similar to dairy milk cans, 
holding perhaps four gallons, and these carried to the 
troop cars. The French non-com in charge of the coffee 
car handed a cup of coffee to me, with a flavor I didn't 
recognize in coffee. I asked what is was and was told 
** Cognac-coffee," that is, coffee flavored with cognac, which 
is considered the last word in coffee with the French. 

We left Rennes before dusk. It was raining slightly 
as usual. After the warm coffee, we felt better; it took 



106 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

off some of the chill and we prepared to spend the second 
night on the train with as little discomfort as possible. 
AD day, we had viewed the country from the train, taking 
in every new and strange sight. It wasn't like America 
and it was somewhat different from England, and to all 
of us, interesting. 

About ten-thirty that night, our train stopped, as I 
supposed, at some station according to its habit. Pres- 
ently the door of my car opened and a cheery American 
voice asked for the Commanding Oflficer. He said that 
owing to the prevalence of influenza at the town we were 
originally to be sent to, we would detrain and billet here 
on orders from Commanding General S. 0. S., and that 
the town was Ploermel. The name sounded all right, 
sort of Irish, though I never heard of it before in France 
or Ireland. 



CHAPTER XV 

Billets 

It was one of the darkest nights I ever saw ; the murky 
rain absorbed the faint rays from my electric torch which 
was the only light we had. The regiment detrained near 
the station and marched into the town, with the excep- 
tion of the Supply Company, which remained to unload 
the baggage and rations. The billeting officer informed 
me that he had arranged for billeting the regiment in a 
college, a convent and some Adrian barracks formerly 
built for and occupied by Belgian refugees. The officers 
were to be billeted in private homes. It was new work 
for us and in the dark, slow to start with, but by mid- 
night the men were all assigned to billets. Headquarters 
Company and the 2d Battalion were assigned to the 
Christian Brothers' College, a very good building, erected 
in Napoleon's time. The 1st Battalion was quartered in 
the old Ursiline Convent, built more than four hundred 
years ago. Later it had been used by the French army 
as barracks. The 3rd Battalion had the Adrian barracks. 

We had no transportaion, and it was necessary to bring 
up our ranges and rations to start breakfast. The mayor 
told the billeting officer, who spoke French, that we might 
be able to get wagons from the French garrison, the 
102d French Heavy Artillery, which was stationed here. 
We found the Adjutant's quarters and this accommodat- 
ing officer got up, awakened some of his wagoners and 
furnished us with teams at 2:00 A. M. The billeting 
officer directed me to Hotel de France, where I slept in 
a real bed. 



BILLETS 109 

The next morning was spent in getting straightened 
around and trying to make things comfortable. We 
had no washing utensils, and there were not sufficient 
in the town stores to provide the regiment. For this 
purpose we had made for each battery some wooden 
troughs, which served well. 

I telegraphed for trucks for transportation and straw 
for bed sacks. The Quartermaster at Ste. Nazaire called 
me on the telephone, and informed me that an auto and 
trucks would be sent to us, but instead of straw, sea-weed 
would be furnished and that a supply had already been 
sent to Ploermel. This was, as he said, much better than 
straw, and is used by the French for filling mattresses. 

Regimental headquarters were established at Hotel de 
Ville (the Town Hall). Here the adjutant and the ser- 
geant-major were comfortably located in a room with a 
grate fire. The billeting officer arranged for my quarters 
in a beautiful house (villa), and as there was sufficient 
room, at my request. Major Gary was also quartered 
there. I had never had any idea that war could be so 
comfortable as we were at Ploermel. 

A schedule for daily drills and instruction was immed- 
iately established. The Officers' School schedule covered 
nearly the entire day — including daily lessons in French. 
This class was taught by a professor of the college, an 
excellent teacher who had lived and taught for twelve 
years in America. The evenings were left free for both 
officers and men. 

Nearly every house in Ploermel was a "Debitant," 
which literally translated, means a small retail shop. The 
"Debitants" sold principally bread, butter and wine. Here, 
in the evenings after mess, the men would go for the 
evening congregating about the old-fashioned oak tables, 
sitting upon benches and stools while Madame, and the 



BILLETS 111 

Madamoiselle, her daughter, would serve the lunch and 
wine. Nearly every soldier had a small French-English 
conversation book and it was here that we really learned 
to speak some French. The men soon became acquainted 
with the various debitants, and then generally went reg- 
ularly, while we were here, to their favorite place. It was 
so different from anything any of us had ever seen before. 
Outside of the debitants there were no places of enter- 
tainment or amusement in the town. No one here had 
ever seen a picture show. France was in the throes of 
a life and death struggle with a merciless enemy and 
little thought was given to amusement. Every male inhab- 
itant of the place capable of bearing arms was in the 
army, and nearly every family was in mourning for some 
one lost. 

The excellent conduct of our men won the warmest 
commendation from the citizens of Ploermel. In my first 
interview with the acting mayor — the regular mayor was 
away in the army, a captain of artillery — I told him that 
our soldiers all conducted themselves as gentlemen and 
would so act to all the citizens; that the men would be 
given liberty in the town daily from 6:00 P. M. till 
9:30 P. M., and on Saturdays from 12 o'clock, noon, and 
also on Sundays, and that no hard liquor or cognac was 
to be sold to any officers or soldiers, and in event this 
rule was violated, the place selling liguor would be 
declared out of bounds for all American soldiers and our 
provost guard would enforce this absolutely. This regula- 
tion was immediately published to all debitants by the 
mayor. Several of them thought it was worth taking a 
chance to sell liquors, but as fast as they were detected a 
guard was placed over the door, forbidding American 
soldiers from entering. In a few days, the mayor came to 



112 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

me saying that these debitant dealers were begging for 
mercy, that their business was being ruined, as nobody 
would patronize them. 

The power for the electric light plant at Ploermel was 
furnished by the water from a small lake, or pond, I 
would call it, not far from the town. Although it rained 
most of the time, the rain was a misty drizzle with 
scarcely any water falling; this had been so for nearly 
two years, I was told. The water became so low in the 
lake that the power failed and the town was in darkness 
nearly all the time we were there, except for candle-light. 

The chaplain familiarized himself with the history of 
the town and the principal places of interest and fre- 
quently conducted sight-seeing tours. Our band would 
give concerts on the place de Arms, across the way from 
the church. One Saturday afternoon we gave an enter- 
tainment on the spacious lawn and park in front of the 
mayor's house. The town crier went through the streets 
sounding a horn and then reading a proclamation from 
the acting mayor telling of a "fete" the American soldiers 
were giving to the towns-people and proclaiming a holiday. 
The towns-people who were mostly women, children and 
old men, came and from the smiles and expressions of 
pleasure I thought they all thoroughly enjoyed themselves. 
The band concert, the songs and especially the boxing, I 
know all of us of the 139th enjoyed greatly. After the 
fete was over the chaplain and I were invited to the house 
to meet some of the towns-people. There was quite a 
reception, although it was impromptu. Everyone paid 
compliments to the excellent character and conduct of our 
men, and all expressed themselves pleased at having the 
regiment billeted here. 

We made some very pleasant acquaintances; the chap- 



BILLETS 113 

lain came to know many agreeable people and several 
evenings we called in response to invitations. I recall one 
delightful evening with the chaplain at the home of 
Madame Davisson, the wife of a surgeon in the French 
army, and her charming family. Some of our young 
officers played the piano and sang. This was the first 
time, she told me, there had been any music in the house 
in four years. Previously to this they had been too 
sorrowful and heartsick. But with the coming of the 
Americans and the turning back of the invader, it was 
now so different. One evening we called and had tea at 
the historic old King James house, occupied temporarily 
I believe, by Mme. Danahu and family. This old place 
was the refuge of the British King James II while an 
exile in France. The walls were very thick, three feet or 
more, and the ceilings low. The furnishings were old 
but artistic. The bed-chamber, the library, and the dining 
room furniture were said to be the same as when the 
house was a royal residence. 

I called upon the French Commandant Major, Adolph 
Cauvet, and thanked him for the courteous action of his 
adjutant in furnishing us with transportation at 2 : 00 A. M. 
the morning of our arrival. The adjutant, who was present, 
expressed heartily the cordial good feelings of the French 
to the American army. "Colonel," said he, "if I were 
to get up with my men to render you this little service 
every night of our lives we could not begin to repay you 
and your countrymen for your help to our France. In 
June the Boche was before Paris and the war was lost 
but for the Americans who have come so far for us.'' 

I assured him that the American people very generally 
felt that they could never repay France for having held 
the Hun back for four long years — ^that we felt that the 




Ai'aud cl Nu«<ij» iimut«i» 



L'histoirc r.-icoiite cjiic c'est danscettf mai^«ni .jui' Jr. ]') 

K()i d'Anj^lotfi re .l;u (jucs IJ, lors dc sun p.iss.i^i- il«»i)i 1 1 i.v . ..^v , -. 
rcjoindri" sc!, lt<»ii|)(.'s aux iiniiot»s<ie Dinaii 



KING JAMES HOUSE— PLOERMEL 



BILLETS 115 

liberty of the world had been saved and preserved by 
the French and that we should have been fighting by 
their side long ago. 

The officers of the 139th were invited to the French 
Officers' Club, which had as quarters several rooms in 
Hotel de France, and also we were informed that we 
could arrange to have our meals in the pension with the 
French officers. This pension was kept by the widow of 
one of the former officers of the French regiment sta- 
tioned here. I personally enjoyed the meals here — the 
French cooking and the method of serving but one thing 
at a time. It was very difficult to get the additional food 
required for our officers' mess in Ploermel, as all the food 
sold there was required by the towns-people and to relieve 
the situation we sent to the American Commissary depot 
at Coctquidan for supplies, which were brought over with 
the rations for the regiment. 

I took a number of walks through Ploermel with the 
French adjutant, he pointing out the various places of 
interest and giving me fragments of the history of the 
town, which was largely the history of ancient Brittany. 

Ploermel owes its name to a hermit monk named 
Armell who came from Grand Bretagne in the sixth 
century and founded a settlement about his church (Plou 
Armell, Colony of Armell.) 

The Carmelite monastery was founded here in 1273, by 
the Count of Richemont. During the hundred years 
war in the 14th and 15th centuries, the town suffered 
from many invasions of the English. Ploermel was 
captured by Edward III, in 1346, who left here an 
Ehiglish garrison under command of Richard Bembro 
who was killed in 1351, at the battle of the Thirty Knights 
between Ploermel and Josselin. 



BILLETS 117 

: After a battle in 1487, the English burned the town 
with the exception of the Carmelite monastery which was 
then outside of the limits of the old walled town. This 
monastery was partially burned by the English about a 
hundred years later. It was repaired and rebuilt in 1622, 
and is now substantial as it was then replaced. 

The principal street or avenue from the railroad station 
leads to Lamermais Square. On the right is the Christian 
Brothers' College. 

Across the way is the church of Saint Armell which 
w^is reconstructed in the 16th century. The tower over 
the church was not built until 1740. The beautiful 
stained glass windows of the church were constructed 
as early as 1535, some are gifts of the Queen Catherine 
de Medici (scenes of the Passion of Christ, and the 
Death of the Virgin.) Above a gallery are eight panels 
representing the legend of Saint Armell. On the left 
side are many statues including one of Joan de Arc. 
In a glass case are some ancient relics from the cata- 
combs of Rome. 

A little further along the same street, on the other 
side, is the Ursiline Convent which we used as billets. 
The convent chapel contains many statues of local interest. 

Only a few vestiges of the ancient wall about the town 
remain — a tower and some portions near it and again 
some of the wall near the Carmelite monastery. The 
oldest houses standing are of the 16th century. 

In going from Ploermel to Camp Meucon, our route 
was by way of Josselin. Halfway between Ploermel and 
Josselin was the Column of the Thirty — a monument 
(obliske) erected in 1823, to the memory of the French 
(Breton) Knights who on the 27th of March, 1351, won 
a victory over the English and German Knights. The 
site of the combat was first marked by an oak tree, 



lis THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

upon its decay a pyramid of stones was erected sur- 
mounted by a cross ; subsequently the present monument 
was built which bears this inscription (translated into 
English) : 

"To the perpetual memory 
Of the Battle of the Thirty 
That Mgr. the Marshall of Beaumanoir 
Won in this place, the year 1351." 
followed by a list of the names of the thirty Breton 
Knights and men-at-arms who fought. Nearly every 
village and town in Brittany seems to be named after 
one of these Knights. 

Marshall de Beaumanoir, of Josselin, leader of the 
French armies in these parts, challenged Richard Bembro, 
commander of the English under Montfort, who occupied 
Ploermel, to a battle. It was agreed that each should 
repair on the date fixed at the head of thirty companions. 
At the first charge four French and two English were 
killed; the French gained the upper hand and Bembro 
and eight of his companions were killed and the rest 
surrendered. Every combatant on both sides was 
wounded. 

Josselin was a quaint old town always to be remem- 
bered by its very narrow streets and the castle Chateau 
de Josselin, the home of the Duke of Rohan. The late 
Duke of Rohan, who was a captain of artillery in the 
French army, was killed at Verdun. 

The chateau which is now said to be one of the 
finest in France, has been modernized and is really 
magnificent. This ancient castle, which is supposed to 
have been built by the Connetable de Clisson, is* a splendid 
specimen of a medieval stronghold. 

Brigade headquarters were established in Hotel de 
Ville, in the large front room on the second floor. The 



BILLETS 119 

other regiments of the brigiade were billeted in towns 
near Ploermel — the 137th at Ploermel, the 138th at 
Malestroit, and the 113th Ammunition Train at Josselin. 

Very early Sunday morning I was awakened by some 
one throwing pebbles into my room, and hearing my name 
called, I went to the window with a candle. Lieutenant 
Bieler had scaled the wall and iron fence of Villa M to 
deliver to me a telegram for the Commanding General 
63rd F. A. Brigade from the French Chef de Garre at 
Gael, stating that in a collision between the troop trains 
carrying the 138th F. A. and the 113th Ammunition Train 
many soldiers had been killed and wounded, and asked 
for ambulances and surgeons. I hastened to the railroad 
station and had the request for ambulances forwarded to 
Coctquidan. Learning that General Mclntyre had arrived 
the evening before and was quartered in a chateau near 
Ploermel, I sent the telegram to him. Leaving instructions 
to awaken our other medical officers and for them to come 
in the first ambulance passing through from Coctquidan, 
Major Gary and I started in our auto to Gael. Ambu- 
lances from Coctquidan were passing through Ploermel 
before we started, the request for them evidently having 
been made previous to my doing so. Day was breaking 
as we passed through the small villages and it was full 
daylight when we reached Gael. 

The collision had occurred in the night while the train 
of the 138th F. A. was at the Gael station awaiting train 
orders. The train carrying the 113th Ammunition Train 
had crashed into the artillerymen's cars, killing thirty- 
eight and injuring nearly one hundred. Most of those 
killed were from the Headquarters Company of the 138th 
F. A. It was deplorable in the extreme and the loss of 
life and suffering was caused, I was informed, by some 
railroad man's neglect of duty in failing to flag the rear 



120 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

of the train. The injured were taken to the hospital at 
Coctquidan and the dead were buried at Camp de Coct- 
quidan with military honors. 

Six second lieutenants just graduated from the artillery 
school at Samur reported to the regiment and were 
assigned to vacancies in the batteries. These young men 
impressed me as being well instructed and efficient and 
proved so to be. General Mclntyre asked me if we had 
any officers I wanted to recommend for promotion. I 
told him that we had — that I would regret to lose any 
of our good officers, but in justice to their merit and 
ability, I would recommend such number as were qualified. 

Together we went over the list carefully and considered 
the record in the regiment and also the standing in the 
examinations in the Brigade schools. After deliberation 
the general told me for vacancies in the 63rd F. A. 
Brigade, the 139th F. A. could furnish three majors and 
seven captains. The Chief of Field Artillery, A. E. F., 
Major General Hines, General Mclntyre told me, said that 
no vacancies in the grade of lieutenant colonel of field 
artillery would be filled in regiments at the present, owing 
to the shortage of field officers. I submitted the following 
recommendations for promotion, all of which were 
approved, and the officers were ordered to take physical 
examination, which they did. The promotions were 
approved by the Chief of Field Artillery, but before 
the order could come down, the armistice was signed, 
and under orders from the Secretary of War all promo- 
tions were held up. 

While these officers did not acquire the promotion 
intended, it is a source of much satisfaction to have been 
able to recommend — and to have the recommendation 
approved — of such loyal, capable and efficient officers. 
We had served together under the most trying conditions 



BILLETS 121 



Headquarters 139th Field Artillery 

Ploermel, France, 

Nov. 1/18. 

From: Commanding Officer, 139th Field Artillery. 

To: Commanding General, 63d Field Artillery Brigade. 

Subject: Recommendations for promotion. 

1. The following is a list of officers of this regiment recommended 
for promotion: 

To be Majors: 

1. Captain Ernst E. Chenoweth 

2. Captain Harry R. Hall 

3. Captain John H. Kiplinger 

To be Captains: 

1. 1st Lieut. Robert H. McKinley (previously 

recommended in United States) 

2. 1st Lieut. Floyd Anderson 

3. 1st Lieut Allan H. Blacklidge 

4. 1st Lieut. Conda P. Boggs 

To be 1st Lieutenants: 

1. 2nd Lieut. George A. Middlemas 

Robert L. Moorhead 
Colonel, 139th Field Artillery. 



Headquarters 139th Field Artillery, 

Ploermel, France, 

Nov. 1/18. 

From: Commanding Officer 139th Field Artillery. 

To: Commanding General, 63d Field Artillery Brigade. 

Subject: 1st Lieut Frank F. Farwell. 

1. It is recommended that 1st Lieut. Frank F. Farwell, Ordnance, 
attached to the 139th F. A. be promoted to Captain. 

2. This officer has been a 1st Lieutenant for more than one year, 
is qualified for his duties, and under the table of organization, the 
Ordnance officer of a heavy artillery regiment has the rank of Captain. 

Robert L. Moorhead 
Colonel, 139th Field Artillery. 



Headquarters 139th Field Artillery, 
Ploermel, France, November 4, 1918. 

From: Commanding Officer 139th Field Artillery. 

To: Commanding General, 63d Field Artillery Brigade. 

Subject: Recommendation for Promotion. 

1. The following is a list of officers of this regiment recom- 
mended for promotion: 

To be Captains: 

1. 1st Lieut. Leslie C. Pitts, 

2. 1st Lieut. Henry N. Odell. 

Robert L. Moorhead 
Colonel, 139th Field Artillery. 
9 



122 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

for more than a year and I know they rang true all the 
way through. 

Major General Hines, Chief of F. A., A. E. F., came 
to Ploermel to inspect the Brigade. General Mclntyre had 
all the officers assembled at Hotel de Ville, where we were 
addressed by General Hines in a very practical and 
instructive talk. The big man always is cleaF, simple and 
direct. These qualities are the essentials. 

The advance school detachment of our brigade was 
attending the Artillery School at Camp de Meucon, about 
eighty kilometres southwest of Ploermel. Here the regi- 
ment was to receive its final training and instruction in 
French material. I drove down to Meucon and secured 
the outline and schedule of the course of instruction for 
use in our officers' school at Ploermel. This was of con- 
siderable benefit to us when we took the course at Meucon 
later, enabling us to take the work much faster. 

The mail from America for the regiment had been sent 
to Camp de Meucon. Learning this I brought back to 
Ploermel the auto filled with sacks of mail for our men. 
No one, not having experienced the sensation, can appre- 
ciate how welcome are letters from home to soldiers in 
a foreign laiid. Thereafter, as long as we were at Ploer- 
mel, an auto or truck from the 139th went daily to Camp 
de Meucon for our mail. 

Our brigade was to go to Camp de Meucon as soon as 
quarters there were available for us. The 54th F. A. 
Brigade had been there in training for months — since 
June, I was told — awaiting material. The German spring 
offensive had resulted in great losses of French material 
and all supplies had been required to replace their losses. 

We were informed that our tractors and trucks were 
at Ste. Nazaire, that there was now material available for 



BILLETS 123 

US as soon as we arrived at Camp de Meucon and that 
the 54th Brigade would vacate its quarters next week. 

On Saturday afternoon, on the grounds of a Chateau 
near Ploermel, we gave a regimental parade and review. 
I invited the Mayor and the commanding officer of the 
French troops to review the regiment. Saturday morning 
the town criers announced the event to the towns-people 
and we had many spectators, although the parade was 
quite a little walk in the country. 

The ground was excellently suited for the purpose. To 
I the right, upon a rise, was the old chateau with its little 
i chapel, to the rear was a fine forest, making a beautiful 
! and picturesque setting. The regiment never appeared 
I better or marched with more precision, although the 
ground was somewhat rough and uneven, due to the 
pasturing of cattle and hogs there. Many were the com- 
pliments the men received from the on-lookers. The 
people of Ploermel were greatly pleased to have this 
parade given to them as an expression of our cordial 
feelings and good will. 

The quarters formerly occupied by the 110th F. A. 
(N. J. N. G.) at Camp de Meucon being vacated by th^ 
movement of that regiment to the front, I received orders 
from General Mclntyre to move our regiment to Camp 
de Meucon and occupy their quarters. The march was to 
be halfway a march by foot and the remainder of the 
distance in trucks. It was raining hard when the regi- 
ment left Ploermel and the additional weight of the water 
did not lighten the load carried. Some of the units were 
carried the first half of the distance in the trucks and 
marched from there into Camp Meucon. Others marched 
the first half and were carried in trucks the last part, the 
effort being to equalize the distance marched for all units. 
I remained in Ploermel with Major Cary and the town 



BILLETS 125 

Major to inspect the quarters vacated and settle any claims 
for damages. The quarters were all left clean and in 
satisfactory condition with the exception of those of one 
utiit which had been quartered in the Carmelite Monas- 
tery with the French garrison — when we were obliged 
on account of the opening of the school in the Christian 
College to vacate part of our quarters there. 

The claims for damages for injuries to property were 
small. The principal one was for injury to the College 
caused by driving nails in the walls to fasten the shelter 
halves to make sleeping compartments as directed by the 
Chief Sanitary Inspector, Base No. 5. Another claim was 
for grass plot destroyed by establishing the kitchen of 
our unit on the lawn of the College. 

A woman entered a claim with the Mayor for a broken 
window light, stating that a soldier broke it and ran. I 
told the Mayor I was satisfied that it was not done by 
any of our men, but I would pay for it out of the regi- 
mental fund. 

After the inspection was completed Major Cary and I 
called at Mayor's bakery and confectionery to bid the 
Mayor good-bye and thank him for his courtesies to us. 
He was very insistent that we should stay a short time 
and have a bottle of wine. Madame, the Mayor's wife, 
came in with a large cake and a bottle of excellent wine. 
The Mayor was enthusiastic about our men — ^the finest, 
best behaved soldiers he ever saw. No drunkenness, no 
rowdiness, no trouble whatever. If he hadn't seen it him- 
self he wouldn't believe it. Yes, we must stay and have 
another bottle of wine — why, when we came here just a 
short time ago I couldn't speak or understand any French 
and now we were sitting here talking together so well. 

As we left some one brought me word that Boston Joe 
wanted to see the American Colonel before he left and 



126 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

together with Major Gary I went to Boston Joe's deb- 
itant, which was really a restaurant. In excellent English 
he told us that he had lived in Boston fifteen years, was 
the chef of a hotel, and had a family there. In 1914 he 
was on a visit to his aged parents who lived in Ploermel, 
and the breaking out of the war had made it impossible 
to get a passport or transportation out of France. He 
would be greatly honored to have the Colonel and Major 
have dinner with him before we left. To this we agreed, 
provided that we pay for our meal. He brought up a 
bottle of very good wine with the dinner, which was the 
best one I had had in Ploermel. Then we went over to 
Hotel de Ville, loaded in the headquarters field desk and 
Chauffeur Scott drove us to Camp de Meucon. 



CHAPTER XVI 

Camp de Meucon 

Camp de Meucon had long been a French artillery 
training station. The artillery range field of fire was 
but a little over 5,000 metres — insufficient for a modern 
howitzer. The camp, I think, took its name from a nearby 
village of the same name. 

The Americans had greatly enlarged the barracks, 
there being when we arrived there, sufficient quarters 
for two brigades of artillery and in addition to many build- 
ings used for school purposes were houses and inclosures 
for German prisoners of war. 

Our brigade took the quarters lately occupied by the 
54th F. A. Brigade, the 139th F. A. occupying the former 
barracks of the 112th F. A. The most noticeable feature 
was the mud, which was predominating. Tons of crushed 
rocks had been hauled in for walks and drives by the 
112th F. A. but much remained to be done. General 
Mclntyre had a quick survey made with orders to erad- 
icate the cause by construction of some large drainage 
ditches. The Brigade furnished working parties with hip 
boots who dug young canals through the camp in an 
effort to better the situation. We all thought this was 
the muddiest place we had ever seen — ^but this was before 
we had been to Camp Pontanezen. 

When I arrived at Camp Meucon I received excellent 
reports about the work of our advance school detach- 
ment, both officers and men. The wireless detail had 
had more training and experience than their instructors, 
and requests were made to detail some of our men to 
the school staff. 



128 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

The hard work which we had put in for so many 
months in our regimental and brigade schools was show- 
ing the hoped-for results and the work of the entire 
regiment at this training school was excellent. One of 
the first things we did was to draw gas masks and take 
up daily drill with them again. A battery of new (French) 
Schneider 155 mm. howitzers, which had just arrived, 
was issued and each battery had daily drill with these. 

HEADQUARTERS 

CAMP MEUCON FRANCE. 
GENERAL ORDERS) October 23, 1918. 

) 
No. 56. ) ' 

Par. 1. General Orders Nos. 25 & 52 these Headquarters, c. s., 
are hereby revoked. 

Par. 2. The following list of calls, effective Oct. 24th, 1918, is 
published for the information of all concerned: 

1st Call (Reveille) 6:15 A.M. 

Assembly (Reveille) 6:30 A.M. 

Mess Call (Breakfast) 6:50 A.M. 

Sick Call 7:30 A.M. 

1st Call (Drill) 7:45 A.M. 

Assembly (Drill) 7:55 A.M. 

Stables 11 : 00 A.M. 

Recall Drill & Fatigue 11:30 A.M. 

Mess Call (Dinner) 12:00 M. 

1st Call (Drill) 1:15 PJVL 

Assembly (Drill) 1:25 P.M. 

1st Call (Guard Mount) 3:20 P.M. 

Assembly (Guard Mount) 3 : 30 P.M. 

Water Call 4:00 P.M. 

Recall (Drill) 4:30 P.M. 

1st Call (Retreat) 5:30 P.M. 

Assembly (Retreat) 5 : 35 P.M. 

"To The Colors" 5:40 P.M. 

Mess Call (Supper) 5:45 P.M. 

Tattoo 9:00 P.M. 

Call to Quarters 9:30 P.M. 

Taps 10 : 00 P.M. 

Sundays 

Ist Call (Reveille) 6:45 A.M. 

Reveille 6:55 A.M. 

Assembly 7:00 A.M. 

Mess Call (Breakfast) 7:20 A.M. 

From early morning until dusk all officers, including 
the regimental commander, were attending classes under 
the instruction of the French and American officers who 



130 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

had returned from service at the front, under orders, 
as instructors. The work was going along admirably — 
General Mclntyre told me that the progress was so 
satisfactory that the length of our training here would 
be considerably shortened — when the news came that the 
Huns were asking for terms for an armistice. Every- 
where hope was expressed that for a while no terms be 
given them until their own country had felt some of the 
rigors of war so long dealt to France; that they should 
get the drubbing they so much merited and that the 
terms of peace be dictated by the victorious allied armies 
upon their arrival at Berlin. The Hun has always been 
a hard loser and isn't even a start at being a sportsman. 
It has seemed, in the light of subsequent and recent events, 
that it would have been much better for the world for 
the Allies to have beaten Germany to a frazzle on her 
own soil rather than to allow her to quit like a whipped 
cur when she found she was beaten. 

At Camp Meucon there was a balloon company and 
a flying field. Here it was that I took my first flight in 
an aeroplane, over Camp Meucon and the artillery range. 
I had arranged to observe the fire of our regiment from 
the airplane during this part of our course of instruction, 
believing that I would understand better the limitations 
as well as the possibilities of air observation from prac- 
tical experience with a trained observer. It was also my 
intention to observe fire from the balloon. 

Returning from school one day at noon, a message 
was handed me that Major Unversaw was at Ploermel 
and wanted transportation to the regiment. The last 
word I had from Major Unversaw was that he was at 
the General Staff School at Lange, and I was not hoping 
for the good fortune of getting him back again in the 
regiment. 



132 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

I sent Scott with the auto to Ploermel and that eve- 
ning, upon return to my quarters, I saw Major Unversaw, 
and with him Captain Mark A. Dawson, of the 150th 
F. A., an officer from Indianapolis whom 1 had known for 
years. Major Roswell C. Otheman, F. A., formerly of the 
New York National Guard also reported, having just arrived 
from Lange. Upon the proposal of the armistice, the 
officers in classes in the General Staff School were nearly 
all relieved and returned to combat regiments. We were 
fortunate in getting three officers from this school 
assigned to us. Major Unversaw, whom we all knew and 
respected for his ability and excellent qualities. Captain 
Dawson, with his long experience in the artillery- arm 
and his recent experience in warfare with the 42nd 
Division. Major Otheman was one of the finest gentle- 
men and most efficient officers I have ever met. 

News came of the acceptance and signing of the armis- 
tice. We were not elated. We were disappointed, bitterly. 
Still we were hoping that we might have some service 
at the front and that the armistice was not peace. The 
French were delirious with joy — for over four years they 
had felt the sufferings and privations of war in their 
own country. A monster celebration was held at Vannes; 
the camp was given permission to attend. I didn't go, 
but I understood it was a night of unrestrained hilarity 
and revelry. 

For a few days after the signing of the armistice, work 
in the classes was carried on, but there was a noticeable 
lack of interest and enthusiasm, both on the part of the 
instructors and the students. Then came instructions to 
turn in our gas masks and our material. We regretted to 
turn in those beautiful howitzers without having used them 
against the enemy. Then instructions came to close the 
school and to take up drill for exercise. 




MAJOR ROSWELL C. OTHEMAN 



134 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

It was then, I believe, that we established the first 
general school for soldiers in the A. E. F. With General 
Mclntyre's permission I reduced the daily drills to three 
and one-half hours with the understanding that the 
other four hours would be used for school. A list of 
subjects which it was proposed to teach was posted on 
each battery bulletin board, and every man could elect 
to study whatever he needed or was interested in. The 
list included common school subjects — writing, arithmetic, 
spelling and grammar — and high school subjects — alge- 
bra, geometry, history, agriculture and commercial law. 
Major Otheman was designated as director of the school 
and each company and battery furnished from its officers 
and men, excellent teachers. Corporal C. G. Harvey, of 
Headquarters Company, in civil life a high school prin- 
cipal and teacher, was in charge of the instruction in the 
elementary and high school classes. We had many school 
teachers and all of them took hold of the work with vim 
and interest. 

Lieutenants Braxton and Hayes, both graduates of 
Purdue and by profession teachers of agriculture, had 
large and enthusiastic classes. I attended many of the 
classes and felt that we were really accomplishing some- 
thing, as more than half of the regiment was in daily 
attendance. The lack of text books was our greatest handi- 
cap and made it doubly hard for the teachers. We bought 
a thousand note books, writing pads and pencils from the 
Y. M. C. A., and with these made notes of the lectures 
and blackboard instruction. The director of the Y. M. C. A. 
and our excellent friend, Mr. Stacy, turned over the 
Y. M. C. A. for our use as a school and rendered us 
every assistance possible. 



CAMP DE MEUCON 135 

Headquarters 139th F. A., 
25 November, 1918. 
TO HEADQUARTERS AND SUPPLY COMPANIES, AND ALL 

BATTERIES : 
SCHEDULE OP CLASSES OF INSTRUCTION: 
Arithmetic 1st Section 2iid Section 3d Section 

Room No. 1 Room No. 2 Room No. 3 

8:30-9:30 Hq. and Sup. Co. Btrys. A, B. C. Btrys. D, E. P. 

Grammar 

9:30-10:20 Btrys. D, E, F. Hq. and Sup. Co. Btrys. A, B. C. 

Penmanship 

10:30-11:20 Hq. Co. A, B. C. Sup. Co. D. E. F. 
SpeUing 

2:00-2:50 Hq. Co. A, B, C. Sup. Co. D, E. F. 

Algebra 

2:00-2:50 All Organizations in Room No. 3. 

Bookkeeping 

2:00-2:50 All Organizations in Room No. 4. 

History 

3:00-3:50 All Organizations in Room No. 1. 

Civics 

3:00-3:50 All Organizations in Room No. 2. 

Agricnltnre 
2:00-2:50 In Lecture Hall. 

3:00-3:50 In Lecture Hall. 

Salesmansliip 
3:00-3:50 In Room No. 3. 

These classes are voluntary, but having elected certain subjects, the 
men will be required to attend. A list of those men in each Unit will 
be furnished the Instructor. 
By order of Colonel Moorhead : 

R. C. Otheman 

Major, 139th Field Artillery, 

In charge of School, 

At this time it was our expectation to be sent to the 
Army of Occupation and we intended to carry on our 
school work as far as possible until we finished our 
service. After this work was well started, the officers who 
were not required for instructors were given permission 
and arrangements were made for their transportation to 
points of historic interest nearby. 

I wanted to have the regiment go to Auray and Carnak, 
but there was no transportation available to take any 
such numbers of men and, the distance being too great 
to march, the plan had to be dropped. 

On Saturday afternoon and all day Sunday, except 



136 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

those actually required for routine details, all were per- 
mitted to go to Vannes or any place in this area that 
they chose. It was during this time that we saw some 
of the most interesting places in Brittany. 

Vannes, the largest and most important city in the 
department of Morbihan (Brittany) was about eight 
miles from Camp Meucon. In the year B. C. 56 Julius 
Caesar captured ancient Vannes, which was then the 
capital of the Venetii, one of the Gallic tribes he tells 
us about in his "Gallic Wars." 

I could not find any ruins there could be authenticated 
as dating to the Roman period, but there were enough 
old buildings left from later ages that could be classed 
as surely and genuinely antique. 

During the Roman occupation fine roads were built 
from Vannes to all the important towns. We traveled 
over a Roman road to Ploermel and also to Nantes. 

The cathedral at Vannes was one of the principal places 
of interest. The present cathedral, built in 1776, on the 
site of the ancient church, contains many interesting 
relics and old tapestries. 

One of the places that especially interested us was the 
ruins of the Chateau de Sucinio which was about four 
kilometers south of Vannes. This castle, the ancient resi- 
dence of the dukes of Brittany, built in A. D. 1250, by 
Jean de Roux, was the subsequent scene of many sanguin- 
ary battles. It was captured by Charles de Blois in 1324. 
The Count of Monfort took possession of it in 1364. 
Du Guescler drove out the English garrison who occupied 
it in 1373. 

In 1491 Anne of Brittany gave it to the Prince of 
Orange. Francis I confiscated the chateau and gave it 
and the dependencies to Francoise de Faix Lady of 



CAMP DE MEUCON 137 

Chateaubriand. Henry IV gave it to Gaspard de Schom- 
berg, a colonel of German cavalry. 

Sucinio has been the home of many of the dukes of 
Brittany, including the celebrated Arthur de Richemont 
(1430), Connetable of France, whose large equestrian 
statue is in the yard of Hotel de Ville, Vannes. Built near 
the ocean, the chateau, in its desolation and entirely 
ruined as it is, presents a. most imposing appearance. 

The entrance is over a draw-bridge across the moat — 
now dry — as we entered I could imagine, 

"The draw-bridge dropped with a surly clang, 
And through the dark arch a charger sprang." 

Six round turretted towers flank the ramparts which 
are developed in the form of an irregular pentagon. The 
walls of the ramparts are pierced with loop-holes, for 
cross-bows and spouts to pour molten metal, boiling oil 
and pitch on the besiegers. 

In the center of the chateau is a large open court, into 
which the people of the nearby village came with their 
cattle and valuables for refuge in times of invasion. 

We felt that the war was over, but we proposed to 
finish our service in the same manner and with the same 
spirit that had so distinguished the men of this regiment. 

An additional number of officers were attached to the 
regiment at this time, and to welcome them, we gave a 
little dinner at the mess hall one evening. The hall was 
prettily decorated, the cooks tried themselves, and the 
band played in its usual good form. The chaplain arranged 
the program, which included a number of short talks, 
some songs by the quartet and a dance by one who was 
announced as "the most beautiful danseuse in France, 
Mademoiselle Andrus.'' Now some of the old outfit knew 
that Bugler Andrus was a fancy dancer, but he was 
recognized by only a very few, and his costume, that of 

10 



138 THE STORY OP THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

a ballet dancer, a dress of white tulle, together with 
perfect make-up, made him appear as a very pretty young 
girl. He was a roaring success ; encored repeatedly, he fin- 
ally danced to one of the French officers present and handed 
him a rose. The gallant Frenchman, not to be outdone, 
seized Andrus' hand and, bowing low, kissed it, much to 
the amusement of those who knew the danseuse. 

Our training with French material ceased before we had 
finished the firing of the problems that were included in 
the course at Camp de Meucon, but it had demonstrated 
that each battery had well-trained firing batteries that 
had readily assimilated the 155 mm. howitzer drill and 
were capable of doing well all that was required of them. 
The long months of training at Camp Shelby, the train- 
ing of the firing batteries for American 3-inch guns and 
later the training and range firing with the American 4.7 
howitzer, the latter fire being entirely under French 
method of fire, so familiarized both officers and men with 
the work that it was almost an old story. The French 
material, ammunition and fuses were new to us and 
required study to have a proper knowledge of them, but 
it was all comparatively easy for us. The long, hard work 
we had put in in the schools in study of the basic prin- 
ciples of artillery had laid the foundation that could be 
added to without difficulty. 



CHAPTER XVII 

Brest and Camp Pontanezen 

The latter part of November I was informed by General 
Mclntyre that our brigade would return to the States as 
soon as transportation could be secured. Prior to this it 
had been our understanding, and it appeared in the Amer- 
ican newspapers, that the troops last to arrive in France 
would constitute the army of occupation and be last to 
return to the States. Thus troops who had been in France 
longest would be first returned to America. 

This, however, proved impracticable, largely on 
account of the difficulties and congestion of transportation 
and the necessity of moving promptly the army of occupa- 
tion to the district to be occupied. 

We were all very eager to be made part of the army 
of the occupation, but as this could not be, it was without 
regret then that we would be returned to the States. 

The first information I had was that we would embark 
at Ste. Nazaire, but when the order came it was for brig- 
ade to move to Brest. 

The regimental commander together with forty officers 
from the brigade were designated to precede the regiment 
by one day to Brest to become acquainted with the camp 
location and conditions. The regiment was to follow in 
two sections on trains the next day and the day following. 

Brest is about one hundred sixty miles from Vannes. 
The advance party made the journey comfortably on a 
French express train. The train was crowded with return- 
ing French soldiers who were on "permission." 

I arrived at Brest at 11 P. M. and was unable to find 
the R. T. Officer, he having left the station for the 



140 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

night. But I was informed by a corporal of the R. T. 
service that our party was expected and we were to go 
to Camp Pontanezen. We were furnished with two trucks 
and a guide, who was said to know where we were to 
go. After driving about five miles and walking several 
more, the guide finally led us to some tents which, accord- 
ing to his chart, were our quarters. Upon entering 
the tents we found they were all occupied. The guide 
insisted that these men were in their wrong quarters and 
should be ousted, but I directed him to conduct us to an 
officer who was acquainted with the situation, but none 
was to be found who knew where we were to go. 

In our wanderings through the camp we came across 
the mess shack of the 138th F. A. and here secured a 
supper about 2:00 A. M. and from there we were con- 
ducted to an empty barrack shed where we spent the 
balance of the night the best we could. 

Our first impressions of Pontanezen were not pleasant. 
As usual it was raining and in our several hours' journey 
about the camp in the dark at nighttime, we were not less 
than ankle deep in mud. The building in which we spent 
the night was one of the temporary barracks just erected 
and prpved to be in the area assigned to our regiment. 

These new barracks, built to accommodate 150 men, 
were long structures with oil paper windows, dirt floors; 
for sleeping accommodations, double deck bunks built of 
2x4s and covered with two layers of chicken wire, were 
provided. With the exception of the pillows, which were 
constructed of half-inch pine boards laid on an angle of 
about thirty degrees, the barracks were comfortable. The 
genius who designed those wooden pillows deserves espe- 
cial mention. Perhaps he made them of the same material 
as his head. Each building was provided with two stoves, 
but the fuel was very scarce. 



BREST AND CAMP PONTAXEZEN 141 

Next morning, Sunday, I reported to camp commander, 
Brigadier General Butler of the Marines. From my con- 
versation with him, I learned that he would do and wa« 
doing everything in his power to make the camp comfoil:-. 
able for the troops, but he was working under almost 
impossible conditions at that time as regards supplies and 
equipment. 

The camp had been laid out originally to accommodate 
not more than 5,000 men in shelter and while it was being 
enlarged, there were at that time nearly 30,000 in camp 
or en route to the camp and over 40,000 more under 
orders to proceed there. 

The camp was originally known as Pontanezen barracks. 
The old stone barracks which were designed to accommo- 
date, perhaps, a regiment, were now used as quarter- 
masters' warehouses and offices. Immediately to the right 
of the old barracks were new American hospital buildings. 
The newly arriving troops were quartered, part in can- 
vas, and in Adrian barracks, which were under course of 
construction. 

Three batteries of the regiment arrived about noon and 
were immediately assigned to quarters. Mess was con- 
ducted by the camp, a lieutenant of the marines being 
designated as mess officer, drew the rations and furnished 
them to the organizations. Our own cooks and mess ser- 
geants prepared the food. One long building constituted 
the kitchen and several of the batteries had to use jointly 
the same ranges. A similar building near the kitchen was 
the mess hall. This was equipped with high tables where 
we ate standing. The condition of the kitchen, mess hall 
and of the surrounding ground was almost indescribable. 
It rained almost constantly for the two weeks we were 
there and the mud was over shoe top deep. There was no 
drainage. The grounds around the kitchen and mess hall 



142 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

became saur and polluted and it was impossible to prop- 
erly police this. Altogether it was a most disagreeable 
condition. 

The continuous and constant rain made our area a ver- 
itable sea of mud and water. One evening as I was going 
to the mess hall, I slipped and fell in the lake of mud that 
surrounded the mess hall. My mess gear, as well as 
uniform, was liberally coated with "Pontanezen muck." 
Immediately I announced then and there that the ban was 
off swearing. 

An effort was made to re-establish our schools and take 
up the classes where we left off at Camp Meucon, but 
this proved impracticable on account of lack of quarters 
suitable for a school building and the very large details 
which we were called upon to furnish for camp con- 
struction work. 

Here again we drew new uniforms, the second set we 
had drawn since the 25th of September. These uniforms 
soon became soiled, as we had no fatigue or working 
clothes. 

The heavy working details, averaging over five hundred 
men per day for the regiment, and the further fact we 
had no drill ground, made it impossible to hold any drills 
other than daily setting-up exercises for men who were 
not on working detail. About twenty per cent of the 
regiment were given passes daily to Brest. 

While here our regimental band and "show troupe," 
including the jazz band, gave entertainments nearly every 
night at the Y. M. C. A. halls, for the different organiza- 
tions at Camp Pontanezen and for the sick and wounded 
in the hospital. So popular did the "troupe" become that 
the field representative of the Y. M. C. A. came to see 
if I would transfer the "troupe" that it might make a tour 
to every camp and hospital in France. The members of 



BREST AND CAMP PONTANEZEN 143 

the "troupe" were just as anxious to return with the regi- 
ment as the rest of us, and I, for this reason, did not 
approve the proposal. 

The trip to Brest was made by walking one and a half 
miles over muddy roads to the street car line, and one was 
not in very presentable condition when he arrived in the 
town. 

Brest is an historic old French town, dating back before 
the Christian era. It has a large harbor, and is one of 
the most important seaports in France, being, I believe, 
the principal naval port. The old castle overlooking the 
harbor is more than five hundred years old and was 
rebuilt by Vauban, who designed the fortifications of the 
harbor and town. If one could see Brest when the sun 
was shining, it would probably be more attractive than 
when we were there. 

While there a number of our officers made application 
for transfer to the S. 0. S. to remain in France. Practic- 
ally all applications that were approved were transferred 
for duty at the camp or with Base No. 5. Among those 
who remained were Captains Chenoweth, Livengood, Cos- 
ton and Stalnaker and Lieutenants Boone, Figert and 
Flannedy. 

Captain Kiplinger received orders here detaching him 
from the regiment and assigning him to the army of occu- 
pation. All envied Captain Kiplinger this detail, as every 
one was desirous of service with the army of occupation. 

When word was received that President Wilson and the 
members of the peace conference were to land at Brest, 
I made application to the camp commander for permission 
to march our regiment to Brest to see the landing and pa- 
rade. Permission was granted in the form of an order 
assigning us for guard duty in the guard of honor to re- 
ceive the President. The entire regiment marched to Brest 



BREST AND CAMP PONTANEZEN 145 

and were assigned to line both sides of the street running 
from the landing dock to the ramparts of the- walled town. 

While we were waiting for the president and party to 
land, a French Colonel of Infantry, who was in charge 
of the arrangements for the French Government, came 
to me stating that a group of radical Socialists had planned 
to break into the parade to present the President with 
a petition immediately upon his arrival, and that a con- 
siderable party of them had broken through the police 
lines assembled further up the street, and were being 
harangued by some of the radical leaders and were 
already causing trouble. To stop this, he wanted a 
detachment of American troops, quick. I referred him to 
the American commander. No, this would not do — he had 
tried to find the commander, but he was not in reach. 

Battery A was on the right of the line. I turned 
to Captain Dawson, hurriedly explained the situation, and 
directed him to report with his battery to the French 
Colonel. They marched away together. 

From subsequent accounts Battery A made short shift 
of these trouble makers, quickly and without unnecessary 
waste of effort. 

The regiment appeared for the first time with our 
division. Cyclone, insignia and this bit of color added 
greatly to their appearance. When the presidential party 
passed, the regiment was brought to attention, all officers 
saluting. Just how long it took the party to pass I can 
not say, but I know my arm was stiff in place when I 
dropped the salute. The party included the President, 
Generals Pershing and Bliss and many notable French and 
American officers. 

The city of Brest was festooned and decorated with 
flags and streamers. The quays were lined with thousands 



146 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

of small children, many of these were war orphans and 
each of whom had a small American flag which was 
waved as the presidential party passed. It was a most 
inspiring sight and one that shall never be forgotten by 
any of us who saw it. 

President Wilson was at this time the most acclaimed 
man in the world. 

The feeling of the American Expeditionary Force rela- 
tive to the proposed American Peace Program was not as 
yet crystallized, but most of those that I heard express an 
opinion were not in favor of our remaining permanently 
in a close alliance with the European countries. The opin- 
ion was that we should not become involved in the racial 
quarrels and century old jealousies of the old world. 

The Central Powers should be made incapable of disturb- 
ing the peace of the world again as far as possible, and to 
this end we should continue firm in association with our 
allies and under no consideration should we make a sepa- 
rate treaty of peace. 

A suggestion made by some of the French Army officers 
that England, France, Italy and America should continue 
in an entente or association for defensive purpose to main- 
tain the peace of the world and to insure the results of the 
victory was rather favorably considered by those Ameri- 
cans who discussed it. All agreed that we should continue 
for the present in some form of association to secure the 
results of the victory, but very few if any favored our 
entering into any alliance that would involve us in local 
European quarrels. 

On each side of the entrance to the Hotel de Ville at 
Brest, was posted a proclamation, one in French and the 
other in English. This proclamation was so unusual 
that I called upon the Mayor and secured the copy in 
English, which is here reproduced: 



j City of Brest 

PROCLAMATION 

To the population of Brest 

In the Honor of President Wilson 

Citizens, 

WILSON, the President of the great Republic of the 

United States, the champion of the Peoples' Rights, he, 
whose love for the principles of Justice, and assisted by 
the countless number of citizens soldiers of his country, 
has given us the chance of destroying the Prussia's Mil- 
itarism, WILSON bestows upon us the honor of landing 
at Brest. 

The importance of this unique event in World's History 
occurs to all of us. Breaking with the traditions of iso- 
lation, the New World sends to the Ancient Continent, 
to war worn Europe, cradle of her ancestors, the eminent 
statesman who embodies the whole ideal of free America. 

This means that the universal Union of all the nations 
is being prepared, after the breakdown of the Powers 
of slaughter and oppression. 

The population of Brest is anxious to celebrate the 
arrival of President WILSON in the most eloquent 
fashion. 

Everyone, whatever party he may belong to, will flag 
his house and associated himself with the manifestations 
of esteem and deep affection which are in course of 
preparation. 

The president is likely to arrive in the afternoon of 
Friday, December 13th. 

Let all workmen leave their work, let all factories clos9 
their doors, until monday morning, Saturday the four- 
teenth beine a public Holidav, to commemorate this event. 
CITIZENS, 

During those memorable days, let us be united in unan- 
imous enthusiasm and gratefulness towards the resvected 
Rem^esentative of the United States. Let us greet him 
with resvect, and hail him a thousand times : 
LONG LIVE WILSON, the CHAMPION of PEOPLES 
RIGHTS 

For the Mayor of Brest, on the front, 
The Mayor assistant, 
E. HERVAGAULT. 



BREST AND CAMP PONTANEZEN 149 

As soon as the parade had passed, the chief of the 
embarkation staff, Lt. Colonel Jewett, handed me an order 
which I read with great joy. The order was for the 
regiment to return to America on the battle-ship fleet. 

File 573.1 Orders 

CENTRAL EMBARKATION OFFICE 

BASE SECTION NUMBER 5 

U. S. ARMY POST OFFICE NUMBER 716. 

December 13. 1918. 
EMBARKATION ORDERS 

NO. 7 
C. O. 139th Field Artilley (7) 
C. O. Pontanezen (3) 

File (3) 

Major Chambers (1) 

Capts. Croker & Hershey (2) 
Inspector General (1) 

1. The organizations named herein will embark on the U. S. Ships 
as listed. December 14th, in accordance with instructions. Troops will 
report at Pier named at the time stated: 
(Organization) Ship (Officers) (Men) (Embark at) (Time) 

8:00 am Dec. 14 



139th F. A. 


"Arizona" 


2 


240 


All of these 




"Texas" 


2 


220 


troops will 




"Arkansas" 


2 


220 


be embarked 




"Wyoming" 


2 


120 


from 




"Florida" 


2 


220 


PIER 3 




"Nevada" 


2 


240 






"Oklahoma" 


3 


240 





Troops assigned to the U. S. S. Arizona and the U. S. S. Texas will 
load on the tender "Smeaton." Troops assigned to the U. S. S. 
Arkansas & Florida will load on the tender "Amakasson." Troops 
assigned to the U. S. S. Wyoming, Nevada and Oklahoma, will load 
on the tender "Nenetto." 

2. Officers' baggage must be sent to Pier No. 3 at 7:00 A. M. and 
must be placed on the proper tender for the vessel to which the officers 
are assigned. 

3. Officers' baggage will go on the same tender with the troops. 
Baggage to be at Pier No. 3 at 7:00 A. M. A detail of one Non-com- 
missioned officer and two men for each tender will report at the sort- 
ing room. Warehouse No. 4 at 10:00 P. M., Friday, December 13th, 
with list of officers designated for organizations aboard the tender, 
to obtain all officers' baggage now at the sorting room. 

4. Organizations will carry with them only their Service Records 
and Field Desks. All other property will be cared for and shipped on 
the "George Washington." 

5. All officers and enlisted men on detail will report to Personnel 
Officer with the organizations to which they are assigned. 

By Command of Major General Helmick : 
F. F. JEWETT 
Lt. Col. General Staff 
Ass't Chief of Staff 
Per Dennis F. Barry 
1st. Lt. Infantry 
Ass't Chief E^mbarkatlon Officer. 



150 THE STORY OP THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

CENTRAL EMBARKATION OFFICE 

BASE SECTION NUMBER 5 

U. S. ARMY POST OFFICE NUMBER 716 

December 13, 1918. 

Memorandum to the Commanding Oflftcer. 139th Field Artillery: — 

Field Officer accompanying the 139th Field Artillery to the United 
States, is directed to proceed to the United States aboard the U. S. S. 
Ok Glioma. 

BY COMMAND OF MAJOR GENERAL HELMICK. 
F. F. JEWETT, 
Lt. Col. General Staff . 
Ass't Chief of Staff 
Dennis F. Barry 
1st. Lt. Infantry 
Ass't Chief Embarkation OflScer. 

Directing Major Unversaw to inarch the regiment to 
camp, I immediately started to make preparations for the 
homeward bound trip on the battle-ship fleet. 

According to my instructions, I took a copy of the 
orders to the camp commander, Camp Pontanezen. The 
chief of staff, Camp Pontanezen, when I delivered the 
order, informed me that he had just received a telephone 
message from the base stating that the order was sus- 
pended and to await further instructions. This was a keen 
disappointment, and as I feared then, the order would for 
some reason, be revoked. We felt that it was a compliment 
to the regiment to have been selected to return on the 
battle-ship fleet. 

Later in the evening written orders were received revok- 
ing the order to embark on the battle-ships and with word 
that battle-ship fleet would not carry troops, but that the 
regiment would embark on the George Washington, which 
had just brought over the President. 



CHAPTER XVIII 

Homeward Bound 

On Deeember 14th, an advance detachment of the regi- 
ment, consisting of the regimental commander, designated 
officers Batteries A and F, left Camp Pontanezen without 
regret and proceeded to Pier No. 2, Brest, where we took 
the lighter to the George Washington, which was anchored 
a little less than a mile out in the harbor. The loading on 
the lighter was promptly and smoothly made and without 
incident. 

As I passed the embarkation officer. Major Chambers, 
he handed me orders from the base commander designat- 
ing me as troop commander of the transport. 

573.1 Orders 

CENTRAL EMBARKATION OFFICE 

BASE SECTION NO. 5 
U. S. ARMY POST OFFICE NO. 716 

December 14, 1918. 
EMBARKATION ORDERS 
NO. 7 

II. Colonel Robert L. Moorhead is designated as Commanding 
Officer of Troops to sail on the U. S. S. GEORGE WASHINGTON. 
By command of Major General Helmick: 
F. F. Jewett 
Lt. Col., General Staff 
Ass't Chief of Staff 
jbs 

Copies to C. O., U. S. S. George Washington 
Colonel Moorhead 

In addition to the 139th F. A., the transport was to 
carry the 137th, less two batteries, about 1,100 wounded 
men and over 300 casual officers including a number of 
General Officers. 

Arriving on board the transport I was conducted to 
my quarters. Very shortly afterward the aid to the 
Captain, Lieutenant Mallin, U. S. N., called and gave me 



152 THE STORY OF THE 189TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

copies of transport instructions and orders. The immed- 
iate details for the guards, police and mess were made 
for the night. 

The next morning the remainder of our regiment and 
137th F. A. reported, and by 1 :00 P. M. the transport was 
loaded. At 2:00 P. M. we weighed anchor and left the 
harbor of Brest for the open Atlantic. The battle-ship 
fleet, on which we were to have sailed, left harbor the 
afternoon of the 14th. It was a majestic sight to see the 
superdreadnaughts form column and move out. 

As soon as the troops were on board, the troop admin- 
istrative headquarters were established. Major R. C. 
Otheman, 139th F. A., was appointed troop adjutant; 
Lieutenant Colonel John C. Blackburn, M. C, troop sur- 
geon. Lieutenant Colonel Frank, 137th F. A., chief police 
officer; Major Dick, Infantry, chief berthing space officer; 
Major Walter H. Unversaw, 139th F. A., commander of 
the guard; Captain Mark A, Dawson, 139th F. A., mess 
officer. 

The transport regulations divided the berthing spaces 
of the ship into numerous small subdivisions, placing each 
in charge of a berthing space officer, taking the respons- 
ibility for the cleanliness and order of the quarters of his 
men from the unit commander. This did not work out 
satisfactorily and in my judgment is absolutely wrong in 
principle. Many more officers were required for these 
details under the navy transport regulations than were 
assigned to the two artillery regiments on the transport, 
and a detail was made from the casual officers. Most of 
these officers performed their duty efficiently and credit- 
ably. 

From my former experience on transport, I arranged 
with the ship's executive officer that the canteen for the 
sale of candies and other delicacies, which are designed 



HOMEWARD BOUND 153 

on board of the ship to upset the stomach, should remain 
closed. There was considerable grumbling and growling 
about this, but there was very little seasickness. I con- 
soled myself that if the men did not have this to grumble 
about, they would find something else and it kept their 
minds off of something else. 

For the first five days daily boat drill was held. The 
system of the assignment of boats and rafts in the Amer- 
ican naval transports, in my judgment does not compare 
for efficiency with the system adopted by the British 
transports. 

The wounded men were on the whole cheerful and con- 
tented. I don't recall hearing a word of complaint from 
one. Most of the cases were machine gun wounds. One 
diminutive infantryman, from the Argonne, had four 
holes neatly bored through him; he couldn't tell which 
one he got first. "They just all got me at once." He was 
getting along nicely and would soon be out, as he said, 
sound and well as ever. One poor chap who had been 
badly gassed came up on the deck daily and sat for hours 
looking wistfully at the sea. I tried to talk with him but 
he couldn't speak above a whisper. He was thin, pale 
and weak. I don't think he was long for this world. The 
transport was so crowded that there was no separate 
space on the deck available for the wounded and most of 
the wounded preferred to stay below in their own quarters 
rather than be jostled by the men on the crowded troop 
decks. 

There was a great deal of good natured chaff and 
bantering among the wounded men. All arms of the 
service were represented and nearly all nationalities, 
including Japanese and negroes. Some one would call 
out, "Who won the war?" The answer was, "The marines." 
Then the argument started and the few marines among 
11 



154 THE STORY OP THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

the wounded would be in for a "chafing." "There were 
nearly five thousand marines at Chateau Thierry and a 
hundred thousand dough boys. The marines are sure 
great little advertisers. Devil dogs, say the rest of us 
got hell sure. But nobody ever heard of any body but 
the marines." 

The ship had a splendid orchestra and band, which 
played at meal times and gave concerts daily. Moving 
picture shows for the men were given every evening and 
proved to be a great enjoyment. 

The weather, almost springlike, was uncommonly warm 
for late December. For the last four days the sea was 
smooth, almost without a ripple. The relaxation from the 
tenseness due to submarine danger on our former trip 
overseas was gone, and the return trip was more like a 
pleasure jaunt. 

A daily paper, called The Hatchet, edited by the ship's 
chaplain, was published on the George Washington. 

The officers and the crew of the George Washington 
were very proud that their ship had been selected to carry 
the President and party abroad. The saloon and a number 
of the first class cabins, quarters, which were used by the 
presidential party, were closed. 

Each evening there was thrown on the moving picture 
screen the number of miles made by the ship in the last 

twenty-four hours and the number of miles yet to be 

< 

made. As I recall it, over four hundred miles were made 
each day and it was almost a record trip. 

Early in the morning of the 23rd of December, it was 
announced that we would be in New York harbor before 
noon. The final inspection of the troop quarters was made 
and all quarters were pronounced satisfactory by the 
ship's executive. By 9 :00 A. M. the Long Island coast was 
sighted on the starboard side. 



HOMEWARD BOUND 155 

The first town I recognized was Northport. 

We passed a number of vessels going into harbor. All 
signalled us a noisy welcome on their whistles and sirens. 
The pilot boat was sighted and the pilot was soon on 
board our ship. 

As we passed other boats from time to time, the men 
would rush from one side to the other of the ship to better 
observe the interesting sights. The ship being without 
cargo and practically out of coal, this lack of ballast 
caused a rolling of the ship which made it difficult to 
handle and unsafe. 

At the suggestion of the pilot, the call to quarters was 
sounded and while at quarters as if for abandon ship drill, 
the men were instructed to remain in that relative position 
until we docked, to prevent the ship from rolling. 

As we went into the harbor all boats sounded their 
whistles and it was almost a continuous roar of noise of 
welcome. Soon Bedloes Island appeared and the Statue 
of Liberty. As we passed this familiar emblem of liberty 
a number of the men remarked, "Well, old girl, if you 
ever want to see me again, you will have to execute about 
face," indicating thereby their intentions of remaining 
on the landward side of the goddess at all times in the 
future. 

Seaplanes and aeroplanes from nearby aviation camps 
followed us up the harbor, circling around our ship. The 
stunts of some of these planes were very entertaining. As 
farther we came into the harbor the noise of the welcom- 
ing boats was continuous. 

Our transport, the George Washington, being the Pres- 
ident's ship, perhaps in a measure was responsible for 
the unusually enthusiastic and noisy welcome. In any 
event, we were all pleased, proud and thrilled by the 



156 THE STORY OP THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

enthusiasm of the American people for the return of the 
soldiers from overseas. 

By 2 :00 P. M. we docked at the Hoboken pier alongside 
the Leviathan. Compared with most of the ships we saw 
going into the harbor, the George Washington was a large 
ship, but alongside the Leviathan it seemed very small 
and diminutive indeed. 

A band and a large committee of ladies from the Red 
Cross were at the dock to welcome us. The debarkation 
staff came on board promptly, and debarkation began 
almost as soon as we were in dock. All of our papers were 
complete and the organizations were promptly marched 
off. The 137th and 139th F. A. were formed in the street 
in the rear of the docks. The wounded were taken in 
ambulances to the various hospitals and in a few hours 
all that were left on the George Washington was that part 
of the crew who were to remain with the ship over 
Christmas, 

As soon as our regiment had completed debarkation, 
it was formed and marched in a column of squads from 
the Hoboken dock to the Erie station. The Hoboken dock 
is about a mile and a quarter from the station. It had 
been announced in the papers that the regiment would 
march, and the street was lined and packed with people 
who had come to see the return of the first of the over- 
seas troops. 

The R. T. O. informed me that we would have a train 
of twenty coaches. Our strength was fifteen hundred men, 
which provided for seventy-five men per coach. The regi- 
ment was so divided but we found that we had one 
hundred fifty men left over. It was dark when we reached 
the train, and the R. T. Officer could not understand where 
the surplus came from until the conductor told us that 
the train had only eighteen coaches. The one hundred 



HOMEWARD BOUND 157 

fifty men were divided quickly in the other coaches and 
we proceeded by rail to Camp Merritt, which was about 
sixteen miles from the station. 

We reached Camp Merritt after dark and were assigned 
temporary quarters for the night. The next morning 
I called upon the Camp Commander for instructions 
and was informed that we would first be deloused and 
then issued new uniforms. I was rather amused at this 
and I explained that we had never had any "cooties" 
that we had been carefully inspected for them at Camp 
Pontanezen and found free from all vermin. That it 
was an extravagant and unnecessary waste to give us 
new uniforms, as we had not had our present uniforms 
more than three weeks. The Camp Commander said his 
orders from the War Department were to delouse us and 
issue new uniforms. I made such a vigorous protest 
about the wasteful extravagance of destroying our over- 
coats that he agreed to waive this part of the order. 

On Christmas eve passes were given to all who desired 
them to remain away over night and on Christmas day. 
The people of New York and vicinity generously and 
freely invited the soldiers to be their Christmas guests 
and nearly everyone had a pleasant day with some 
family. 

A communication from the Camp Inspector called 
attention to our Division insignia stating that it was 
unauthorized by Army Regulations and War Depart- 
ment orders and that the Camp Commander directed 
it to be removed. I replied that our Division Insignia 
had been approved and authorized by General Pershing — 
that all Divisional troops overseas wore insignia and 
would wear it when they came from overseas and endless 
trouble would ensue if ordered to remove it. Further- 
more, that it was not specifically interdicted by orders 



158 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

in America as were the Sam Browne belts. In reply 
I received another communication calling attention to 
certain specific cases of our men wearing Division Insig- 
nia and directing that it be removed. I replied requesting 
that my letter in the matter be referred to the War 
Department for decision. I have understood that War 
Department promptly authorized overseas troops to wear 
their Division Insignia. 

The twelve days we spent in Camp Merritt gave 
everyone a chance to see New York and as long as their 
money lasted the men of the 139th took every advantage 
of this opportunity. While here we had a picture 
taken of each battery and company, one of which was 
given to every man in the regiment. A design for 
a regimental ring was selected and a ring was ordered 
for every member of the regiment which was subse- 
quently sent to the men. 



CHAPTER XIX 

Demobilization 

Shortly after our arrival at Camp Merritt, I received 
a telegram from General Harry B. Smith, Adjutant- 
General of Indiana, informing us that the War Depart- 
ment had authorized the demobilization of the regiment 
from Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana. Upon receipt of 
official confirmation of this I issued an order directing 
Captain Mark A. Dawson to proceed to Fort Harrison, 
as Advance Officer, and arrange for our quarters. Captain 
Dawson was selected on account of his long familiarity 
with this post, and his wide acquaintance in Indianapolis. 
On January 4th orders were received for the regiment to 
entrain in three sections for Fort Benjamin Harrison on 
the following day. 

I travelled with the first section which included the 
Headquarters Company and Batteries A and B. We left 
Camp Merritt at 2:00 P. M., via West Shore R. R., to 
Albany, thence by New York Central to Buffalo, Lake 
Shore to Cleveland, and Big Four to Fort Harrison. As 
we came near Albany, I saw the first snow I had seen 
for two years. Our train equipment consisted of tourist 
sleepers with kitchen cars. Details from each unit pro- 
vided hot meals en route. The electric lights had been 
removed from all the cars, and at night the only light 
we had was a few sputtery candles, which had the effect 
of sending everyone early to bed. Just why the electric 
lights should have been removed, I was unable to tell, but 
we all had the impression that the government was being 
charged the full tariff rates by the Pullman Company. 




m 

O c: 

§1 



DEMOBILIZATION 161 

Our train made excellent time. One of the few stops we 
made was at Cleveland, where the Red Cross dispensed 
chocolate. A representative of the Y. M. C. A. accom- 
panied our train and provided magazines and books for 
everyone who cared to read. As we sped over the white 
snow fields, everyone was happy in the thought that they 
would soon be home again. Our train arrived at Fort 
Benjamin Harrison at 6:30 P. M., January 6th, where 
we immediately detrained and marched to barracks lately 
vacated by the Engineers who had been in training there. 
The quarters were very comfortable and in fact it was 
the best camp we had in the entire service. The remainder 
of the regiment arrived at Fort Harrison the next day, in 
accordance with the pre-arranged schedule. 

The next morning I called upon Colonel Willing, 
Engineer Corps, Camp Commander. This officer, together 
with the other officers who were designated for demob- 
ilization of the brigade, were most courteous and con- 
siderate. The battery commanders, together with the first 
sergeants and company clerks, were assembled and given 
instructions relative to the demobilization lists and papers 
and work was immediately started. Most of this work 
required only the services of the first sergeants and bat- 
tery clerks, and the other men had a great deal of 
liberty. 

The Women's Auxiliary of the 38th Division, together 
with the other patriotic societies, gave several entertain- 
ments for the men of the Artillery Brigade. 

Lieutenant Colonel J. M. Eager, F. A., reported to me 
that he had been sent by the Chief of Field Artillery 
to examine and report concerning any officers of the 
brigade who might desire to remain in the regular service. 
At the same time, I received a telegram from the Chief 



162 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

of Field Artillery directing that such a list be prepared 
and submitted. 

The officers of the regiment were assembled and 
informed of this, with the statement from me that I 
would recommend for retention in the regular army any 
officer who made application, whose record was good, and 
who in my opinion would be a credit to the service. Three 
officers of the 139th F. A. made application and, I think, 
about a dozen officers of the 137th. 

On January 9th the regiment with the brigade gave, 
in accordance with orders from the Secretary of War, a 
parade and review in honor of Colonel Roosevelt, whose 
death had so shocked the nation. We all felt that it was 
indeed an honor for us to parade in memory of this great 
man, and I felt that it was peculiarly fitting that the last 
parade of the regiment, as such, was in honor of the 
memory of the greatest American of his day and time. 

As Brigade Commander I invited Colonel Willing to 
receive with me the parade, and review the brigade. 
Major Unversaw commanded the 139th F. A., and Colonel 
Lansing the 137th. Both regiments appeared well, but 
the long continuous training in marching as infantry was 
especially noticeable in the marching of the 139th, as 
they passed in review in column of platoons. When the 
parade was finished, we all were very sober, and perhaps 
a little sad that it was the last time the 139th F. A. 
would ever be assembled for parade. 

A reception committee of the state and city had planned 
a reception to the brigade, including a theater party. The 
details, as arranged by Adjutant-General Harry B. Smith, 
greatly pleased the men of the brigade. We boarded 
traction cars at Fort Harrison, detrained in Indianapolis 
at the Court House, and made a march through the prin- 
cipal business streets of the city to the Murat Theater. 



164 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

TPie streets were crowded with spectators and citizens. 
Delegations of citizens from all over the state, especially 
from the towns where units of the brigade were organized, 
were present in large numbers. The greatest enthusiasm 
was shown by the citizens and the line of march through 
the crowded streets was almost a continuous ovation. The 
day was bright and clear and warm for mid-Januaiy. 

The entertainment at the Murat Theater was preceded 
by brief addresses by Governor Goodrich, and Mayor 
Jewett, welcoming the regiments back to the state and 
city. The following is an account of this event from the 
Indianapolis News, Saturday, January 11th: 

INDIANA WELCOMES ARTILLERY TROOPS 



Parade of First Regiments That Have Returned From 

Overseas 



THOUSANDS LINE STREETS 



Addresses at the Murat and Show by Performers From Theatres 



Thousands of admiring Hoosiers lined streets in the business district 
Friday to see and cheer the first Indiana units to return from service 
in France— the 137th and 139th Field Artillery Regiments, 2,780 strong. 

Governor James P. Goodrich and his military staff, Harry B. Smith. 
adjutant-general of Indiana; Mayor C. W. Jewett, m%;mbers of the 
legislature and delegations from twenty-two Indiana cities, reviewed 
the two regiments on parade from a stand in front of the old Library 
Building, Ohio and Meridian streets. Patriotic decorations hung from 
windows of all buildings along the line of march and no chances 
were overlooked to impress the returning soldiers with the gratitude 
felt toward them in Indiana. 

Governor Goodrich and Mayor Jewett, in speeches to the Indiana 
men of the 63rd Field Artillery Brigade given at the Murat Theater 
Friday afternoon, complimented the officers and men on the splendid 
appearance of the organizations. 

"It is the proudest privilege of my term in office to welcome you 
men home and to try to express to you the gratitude the people of 
this state feel," said Governor Goodrich. "While it was not your high 
privilege to see service on the battle front, you have shown willing- 
ness to make the greatest sacrifices men can make for their countr>'. 
We will all feel honored to have you back among us in civil life." 



DEMOBILIZATION 165 



Glad They Are Back 

"Some one asked me in the reviewing stand, a moment ago, what 
I thought of the regiments as they passed," said Mayor Jewett. "I 
immediately recalled a certain college football tackle, behind whom 
I played as right half several seasons. He was a rangy chap, 
with a long arm and a bony hand, and he never waited to be hit, but 
always hit first. When a backfield man went through his position 
this tackle always reached out and pulled his opponent out of the 
road. The men of these regiments looked like that kind, and I believe 
they would have used just such effective methods on the Hun if 
they had had the opportunity. 

"We are glad to have you back in Indianapolis, and if there is 
anything here you want I want you to have it — if you ought to have 
it. Men of such manhood as you have shown can be trusted with the 
freedom of any city." 

Colonel C. C. Lansing was loudly cheered when he rose to give a 
brief response on behalf of the 137th regiment. He said he rejoiced 
that the men could be brought back to Indiana in saftey and paid 
the men of the regiment a high compliment as the best behaved and 
most able soldiers he had ever commanded. 

Colonel Moorhead, responding to the welcome given him and his 
men, said: "One of my newspaper friends asked me if I could tell 
him what I was going to say or give him a copy of my speech. I 
asked him, 'What speech?' He told me I was to reply to an address 
of welcome here today. 'Well,' I said, 'soldiers don't make speeches, 
but we have a chaplain who is a sure-enough speaker, and I will get 
him to write me a speech.' I did, and it was a dandy for a chaplain 
to make, but a regimental commander could hardly make such ful- 
some statements, in the presence of his men, even if he believed what 
he said. 

"I wish to assure you that I appreciate very much the opportunity 
you afford me to stand with our Indiana soldiers in your presence. 

"The men of this brigade wanted to fight 

"When the Huns heard that we were in France they immediately 
pleaded for an armistice. 

"The war would have closed six months before it did had we been 
sent over six months before we were. 

Mindful of Honor 

"These Hoosier soldiers were mindful of the honor of the home 
state, and I believe that consciousness aided the development of their 
morale. 

"I trust I have pardonable pride in being their regimental com- 
mander. 

"It has been worth everything to me to have aided in the training 
of this regiment; to have watched over the development of the men, 
and now to see them as self-reliant disciplined soldiers mustered out. 

"The men of the regiment have had pride in the training and in 
their work from the beginning. As recruits, it was our aspiration to 
be the best heavy field artillery regiment in the army, and in doing 
each day's duty, nothing would suffice but the best effort in each and 
every one of us. 

"I count it a privilege to have been one of the officers who brought 
their men to a point where they could have 'delivered the goods.' 
They did not lack the 'goods.' It was the opportunity that was lacking. 

"On behalf of these men and their friends I accept the tribute of 



166 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 



today offered by their fellow-citizens. I express their sincere appre- 
ciation of the festivities of this hour. And, General Smith, our affection 
for you is interwoven into our military experience," 

Volunteered Services 

Actors and actresses of the theatres who volunteered to take part 
in the entertainment program were: Circle, Miss Morrell and Hawaiin 
trio; Majestic, Hughy Bernard, monologue and songs; B. F. Keiths', 
Minetti, piano accordionist, Mary Jane Reid, songs, and Frances Hop- 
kins, pianist; Murat, William Faversham and Miss Maxine Elliott; 
B. F. Kieth's Florrie Millership and Charles O'Connor, song and 
dance; English's opera house, "P''lo-Flo" company, Miss Rena Parker, 
James B. Carson • and Andrew Tombes ; Rialto, Muriel Prince ladies 
quartet. The Lyric theater also provided a number for the program. 

The three high schools of the city were dismissed at noon in order 
that the students might see the parade and arrangements were made 
by E. U. Graff, superintendent of schools, that all grade school pupils 
who desired to see the parade might be dismissed for the afternoon. 

Leads Parade 

Colonel Robert L. Moorhead, commander of the brigade, and oflScers 
of his' staff, led the parade with the band of the 139th. The 138th 
field artillery, a Kentucky unit and the third regiment of the brigade, 
is not encamped at Ft. Harrison, but was ordered to Camp Zachary 
Taylor, Ky., for demobilization. 

Headquarters company of the 63rd brigade marched in advance of 
the two regiments. Colonel C. C. Lansing, commander of the 137th, 
who is a New York man, announced that each unit of the regiment 
would be commanded in the parade by an Indiana officer. He gave 
up his place to Captain Elmer D. Rex, of South Bend. The 137th has 
no field officers now besides its commander. Colonel Lansing reviewed 
the parade with the Governor's party as the guest of Adjutant-General 
Smith. 

Formation of Parade 

The 139th regiment followed the headquarters company, with Major 
W. H. Unversaw, of Franklin, in command. The 2nd battalion, com- 
manded by Captain Harry R. Hall, led the regiment. It is comDOsed 
of Batteries C and D. Then came the 3rd battalion, Batteries E and 
F, commanded by Major J. A. Umpleby; the 1st battalion. Batteries A 
and B, commanded by Captain Mark A. Dawson. The headquarters 
and supply companies and medical detachment came la^t in the 
regiment. 

The 137th parade formation was: Captain Elmer D. Rex, and regi- 
mental staff, regimental band, headquarters company, 1st battalion, 
Batteries F. D and C, commanded by Captain Clinton D. Rogers; 2hd 
battalion, Batteries C, A and B, commanded by Captain Arthur B. 
Gray, and the supply company. 

Start for City 

The brigade entrained on special interurban cars at Ft. Harrison 
at noon and came to Alabama and Washington streets to form. The 
movement was accomplished with smoothness acquired by seventeen 
months of drill and discipline. The call to entrain was given at 11 
o'clock and the 139th started for the city at 11:45. 

Signs welcoming home the men of the Cyclone division marked the 
line of march. The Indianapolis Light and Heat Company on the 
Circle was decorated with a huge sign, and all the young women 
employes of the company leaned from windows and blew horns a;s 
the soldiers marched past. 



DEMOBILIZATION 167 



At the Murat 
The parade ended at the Murat theater, where a program of enter- 
tainment had been arranged, including the speeches of welcome by 
Governor Goodrich and Mayor Jewett and responses by the two 
commanders. 



Dance at Ft. Harrison 
Special cars will be provided for those who go to Ft. Benjamin 
Harrison Saturday evening for the dance to be given by the Woman's 
Auxiliary of the 38th division for the men of the 137th and 139th 
field artillery. The dance is invitational for girls; those who go 
unchaperoned must have cards from the courtesy committee, of which 
Mrs. Allen T. Fleming is chairman. Music will be provided by the 
regimental bands. The afternoon reception will begin at 2 o'clock, 
and the dancing will start about 7:30. 

We all felt grateful and pleased at the reception given 
us and especially appreciated the courtesy of the actors 
who had given the performance. 

The work of the demobilization of the units proceeded 
without a hitch, and as rapidly as a unit was mustered 
out the men marched, in most instances, to special cars 
or trains that were waiting to take them to their home 
towns where a second reception awaited most of them. 

Nearly every battery had a farewell dinner at one of 
the hotels here in Indianapolis. I attended the dinner 
given at the Hotel Severin by the Headquarters Company 
and had a very enjoyable evening. Some of the batteries, 
in addition to the dinner, had a theater party following it. 

All of the units were demobilized by January 20th, and 
on January 24th, I received an order from the Head- 
quarters Central Department, discharging me from the 
service. 

While we were at Fort Harrison, I had the pleasure of 
meeting the parents and relatives of many of the men of 
the regiment and it was a matter of the greatest satis- 
faction to me, as I am sure it was to the others, that in 
every instance. I was able to say without any reservation, 
to the mother or to the father, that their son had proved 
an honor to his parents, and was an excellent soldier. 



168 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

This was so universally the case, that I do not think there 
was a single instance in which, upon inquiry as to the 
quality of the service rendered by the young man, either 
I or the battery commander could not unhesitatingly say, 
"Your boy has done well." 

Many distinguished visitors called at regimental head- 
quarters, and it was gratifying to all of us to know that 
the folks here at home whose opinion we valued more than 
any other, had had good reports from everywhere, con- 
cerning the regiment. By the regiment, I mean the men 
of the regiment. 



*La guerre a fiiiie." 







HOME IN INDIANA 



— Indianapolis News 



12 



170 the story op the 139th field artillery 

Poems 

By Will E. Rogers, Battery E, 139th F. A. 



HOME TS INDIANA 

Aye, I say we've waited long 
Sang a million times that song, 

That song of "Indiana." 
There was no song we cared to sing 
That could sweeter memories bring 

Than home in "Indiana." 
I've clean forgot about the rest! 
We thought we's gettin' there at Brest 

While wadin' an' a slushin' 
'Roun' ol' Pontanazen Barracks 
Using shoestrings fer derricks 

While tongues were busy cussin'! 
Yes, we're leavin' here today 
Happy, joyous on our way 

With faces all a bloomin'. 
Different from the soun' o' guns, 
Thoughts o' dugouts an' of Huns. 

An' whizzbangs all a boomin'. 
I love the East a thousand times — 
I love its people an' its climes. 

But O, that land of Glory! 
I'm yearnin* fer them fields an' hills 
That drippin' noise of dreamy rills, 

An' all that's great in story. 
I'm hopin' for a speedy look 
To greet the sight of every nook 

Out there where Daddy's farmin'. 
I want to greet the early morn — 
The snow an' frost on shocks o' corn 

An' everything that's charmin'. 
Aye, its great to be a lad. 
Who loves the memory that he had 

Of joys in "Indiana." 
There was no song we cared to sing 
That could sweeter memories bring. 

Than home in "Indiana." 

THESE ARMY HAYS 

(Somewhere in France) 
I'm kinder lonesome these Army days, 
I long fer home an' its homelike ways. 
Fer ol' Indiana, an' — well, somehow 
I wish to heaven I'se back there now. 

I wish I'se back where the Hoosier folks 
Are backin' us up in the cause we're in; 
Where they think of us with a smile, a tear 
An' are prayin' we'll all come home agin. 



POEMS BY WILL E. ROGERS 171 

I wish I'se back an' the war wus o'er 
So the heart o' Mother won't break no more; 
So her eyes won't dim with the burnin' tears 
An' her hair grow gray with the passin' years. 

I wish I'se back where the blushes bloom 
Deep an' red in a lassie's cheek; 
Where dimpled smiles dispel the gloom 
An' a voice sounds soft an' low an' sweet. 

Where eyes are gleaming an' the light therein 
Burns alone fer me an' the days to come 
When the fierce red fray an' the battle's din 
Shall float away an' the lads go home. 

I wish I'se back, but the job's too big 
Fer the Soldier Lads who're over here, 
So I'm learning to fight, to jab, to dig; 
To carry my burden to do my share, 

So that peace may come an' a bright, bright day 
Shall illumine the world, an' right make way, 
When the horrors of war, of battles are done 
An' Victory for peace at last is won. 

GOING HOME 

(Dec. 15, 1918) 
Well, old boys, we've crossed the deep 

We've sailed before the mast, 
We've licked the dirty Germans 

An' we're going home at last. 

SEA GULLS. N. Y. HARBOR 

Dec. 23, 1918 
Oh, you silent flying Seagulls 

Upon silvery velvet wing! 
How I love again to greet you 

And the memory that you bring 
Of a Homeland lying yonder 

Just beyond the dim skyline; 
Of that life of joy awaiting 

And the happiness that is mine. 

PL0ER3IEL, FRANCE 

(An Incident) 
Sunbeams were creeping upward 

'Twas in the early day 
While brown-clad Yanks were marching 

Along the French highway. 
Out then she came to greet us — 

Out 'neath the chestnut trees 
Where golden leaves were floating 

Upon the Autumn's breeze. 
'Twas then that little lassie, 

She with the curly hair 
Threw flowers upon the Yankees 

As they were standing there. 



172 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

YAIfNES, FRAJNCE 
(November, 1918) 
Yes, we saw them come a-clickin' 

Down the narrow winding street, 
The women with their wooden shoes 
A-clatterin' on their feet. 

Jes' a-clickin* an' a-clackin'; 

Jes' a-bobbin' up an' down 
An' mirin' in the mirky soil 

Of this age bespattered town. 

AT BREST, FRAIfCE 

We felt like heroes when we went away — 

Felt like heroes with the selfsame clay. 

We wanted to be in the battle-line 

With the sturdy lads as they crossed the Rhine 

We wanted to shoulder a rifle an' fight 

In brightness of day or darkness of night. 

But we only got across the sea — 

A front line trench we ne'er did see. 

We fought no Huns an' spilt no blood, 

Our only fight was with seas of Mud. 

A HOOSIER'S GREETIjNG 

My, but it's great to be at home — 
See the grins an' smiles that come 

All flickerings an' so fleeting 
See them looming into space 
O'er each child's an' grownup's face — 

That smile of welcomed greeting. 

Good to walk the city's street. 
Know each face we chance to meet 

And hear each friend repeating 
While he's poking out a hand. 
Heart to heart an' hand to hand, 

A Hoosier's warmest greeting. 

Yes, old chap, it's good to be 
Back from lands beyond the sea — 

Beyond the billows heaving. 
Hear again the murmur of 
Voices that we used to love. 

An' meet each kindly greeting. 

It's great to see the people stir 
Along the street — meet here an' there 

Some Soldier Boy a grinning. 
When he meets a sweetheart who — 
Who was faithful an' so true 

While he was battles winning. 

Aye it's great to be at home — 
See the grins an' smiles that come 

All flickering an' so fleeting. 
See them looming into space 
O'er each child's an' grownup's face 

That smile of welcomed "Greeting." 



POEMS BY WILL E. ROGERS 173 

RUMORS 

(Camp Shelby, Miss.) 
Printed by Trench and Camp 

There are rumors in the air, 
I can hear them everywhere 
As they float upon the balmy 

Southern breeze. 
And they come from everywhere 
But from mostly "Overthere" 
Where the bullets and the whizzbangs 

Sizz and sneeze. 
Oh, methinks I hear the splash 
Of the billowy waves that dash 
'Gainst the transports that are labeled 

"Overseas." 
And the jolly lads that yell 
Back to sweethearts "All is well" 
As they crowd against the railing 

Thick as bees. 
Yet they look with eager eyes 
Toward the smoky eastern skies 
Where the leaden balls and steel ones 

Fall like rain. 
But they say it won't take long. 
"Goodbye, Broadway" is their song, 
Till they're sailing on the billows 

"Home again." 

SERGEANT WATTS 

(Madison Courier) 
When reveille sounds an' roUcall crowns 

The height of yer morning's sleep ; 
When the dawn's so cool that the swimming pool 

Is seemingly frozen deep, 
Ye'd better roll out, tho you've got the gout 

Be "Sammy" right on the spot, 
Fer, by Jinks, you know when the bugles blow 

Ye'll account to Sergeant Watts. 

"Attention," he says, — to the end of yer days 

You'll think of that stern command, 
An' if slow ye be — jes' take it from me 

You'll tremble to beat the band. 
Fer his eyes don't dream, they glint an' they gleam 

Right thru you like German shots, 
So listen, dear boy, if you want real joy. 

Don't monkey with Sergeant Watts. 

If you loaf uptown, jes' foolin' aroun' 

Spendin' yer hard-earned dimes, 
The Sergeant don't keer jes' so you are here 

When the tattoo blows at Nine. 
When "Staggy" blows "taps," tho you haven't the gaps 

Come off with them shoes an' socks — 
Be safe in the straw, er the chance you'll draw 

A sentence from Sergeant Watts. 




CHAPLAIN BURCHARD BRUNDAGE 



CHAPTER XX 

The Chaplain's Chapter 

By Chaplain Burchard Brundage 

The Chaplain was trained only in the arts of peace, but 
the invasion of Belgium stirred his heart so that he 
became an ardent advocate of war. When in the course 
of events it became apparent that a fourth regiment of 
infantry was to be added to the Indiana National Guard, 
in co-operation with Col. Winfield T. Durbin he urged 
the raising of a company in Anderson. This company, 
(M), later went to a machine gun battalion when the 
regiment was transferred to heavy artillery. Governor 
Goodrich appointed the Chaplain, giving him a com- 
mission as First Lieutenant, dated July 23d, 1918, notice 
of which was handed to the Chaplain by Colonel Moor- 
head in the home of Colonel Durbin. 

Monday morning, August 6th, 1918, in response to 
the call of the President of the United States, the Chap- 
lain reported for duty at the Headquarters of the 4th 
Indiana Infantry, the Fair Grounds, Indianapolis, Ind. 
The spiritual history ot this regiment is unique in the 
support the enlisted men gave to the services of the 
Chaplain ! 

To begin with it was clearly shown that there was 
no bigotry and no partiality shown, the Rev. Father 
Gavisk and the Rabbi Feurlicht were invited to address 
the regimental services the first two times the regiment 
met for worship, these services were held in the Audi- 
torium at the State Fair Grounds, and were largely 
attended by the men and their friends who were near 
enough to spend the day in this improvised camp. 

Upon removal to Fort Benjamin Harrison the regi- 



176 THE STORY OP THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

mental services were held under the spreading branches 
of an ancient and stately elm, which came to be known as 
the "Chaplain's Elm/' The last service here, the Sunday 
before starting for Camp Shelby, Mississippi, was attended 
by more than 5,000 people, friends from all over the state 
gathered in for a final visit with the men who were 
expecting to go to the front soon. 

Shortly after the mobilization order it became quite 
evident that the embarrassing lack of equipment in pos- 
session of the United States made it necessary for many 
enlisted men to buy their own initial equipment, and 
that some of the men would no doubt be in need of 
assistance, at least temporarily, so as to relieve any occasion 
that might arise some influential citizens placed in the 
hands of the Chaplain a fund amounting to $386.00, with 
instructions to give an enlisted man any amount from 
a postage stamp to a R. R. ticket. 

How useful this fund proved to be may be known by the 
fact that more than eight hundred occasions arose for the 
intervention of the Chaplain with this fund. 

Upon arrival in Camp Shelby, Miss., the first work 
of the Chaplain was to request the removal of the 
Y. M. C. A. hut assigned to our regiment, from a hill- 
top nearly a mile away to a location within the regimental 
area, which was finally arranged. The services for worship 
were held out of doors, whenever the weather permitted, 
there being in Camp Shelby a fine natural amphitheatre 
to which the regiment marched every Sunday morning, 
headed by the band playing "Onward Christian Soldiers." 

An impressive service was the Easter morning cele- 
bration of the Lord's Supper, in which about 1,100 men 
took part, this service was held in the Y. M. C. A. hut, 
and the Holy Supper was spread with the white enamel 
dishes of the officers' mess. 



THE CHAPLAIN'S CHAPTER 177 

Following an impressive military custom the Colonel 
decided upon the ceremony of Consecration of the Colors. 
The regiment was formed in a hollow square, one battery 
escorted the Colors to the position of honor and the 
Chaplain, assisted by the Y. M. C. A. Secretary and 
a Catholic Priest, most solemnly consecrated and dedicated 
the new Colors of the regiment. 

Several times, in response to personal requests, cele- 
brations of the Lord's Supper were held in the Chaplain's 
tent, the occasions being the baptism of some man and 
his reception into the Christian Church by the Chaplain, 
and his dismissal to the Home Church. 

The Chaplain was permitted to be deeply interested 
.in the careers of his men, and advised and assisted six 
young men in their preparation for the Christian Min- 
istry, and in one case to hold the Ordination service in 
the Chaplain's tent, this service being conducted by an 
official sent from Pennsylvania for the especial duty of 
ordaining the young soldier. And from time to time a 
marriage would be read in the narrow and quiet spac6 
afforded by the Chaplain's tent. 

The Chaplain accepted no marriage fee from the 
enlisted men. A report of such weddings was duly made 
to the Adjutant General of the Army. A most wonderful 
religious service was the Field Communion Service the 
last Sunday the regiment spent in Camp Shelby; 1,450 
men assembled around the community center of the 
regiment, where so many good times had been enjoyed, 
no race nor creed was emphasized, the Holy Supper 
was spread and Jew and Catholic and Protestant all 
together in a most solemn dignity ate to the Lord he 
remembered, the Faith of. his home altar, the creed 
of ancestry! 



178 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

In Camp Upton the morning the regiment was to 
embark, after months of patient and wishful waiting, 
the Chaplain arranged two early morning services, a 
Mass by a Priest at 3:30 a. m. and a Regimental Service 
at 4:00 a. m., so in the last hours before embarking the 
opportunity of familiar Divine Worship was provided 
for the men of this regiment. 

Services on ship were impressive and beautiful, conducted 
Fore for the men of our regiment and Aft for the other 
organizations on ship with us. A most solemn and touching 
event was the burial at sea of one of our men who came to 
us at Camp Shelby — Private Fryant of Supply Company, 
whose home was in Mississippi. The silent cortege moved 
the length of the great ship, to a place starboard aft where 
the service was spoken, ending with Crossing the Bar, the 
burial and the Benediction. 

In England after a largely attended regimental service 
the Chaplain arranged to march the men to the village 
church, the building being more than 800 years old, and 
capable of housing more than 300 persons. Fully 600 men 
took advantage of the privilege and after filling the 
village church to an unwonted fullness, for the large 
detachment remaining the Chaplain arranged a trip to 
the historic Elizabethan Mansion, near the village, and 
the home of a bishop. 

In France, always on Sunday morning the men res- 
ponded graciously when the tones of the beautiful Church 
Call were sent out by the bugler, always taxing the 
capacity of the Y. M. C. A. hut, and astounding the 
Hut Secretary by the immensity of our regimental con- 
gregations. 

Always the Chaplain worked in closest union and 
harmony with the Y. M. C. A. The finest of memories 
remain of wonderful hours together with the splendid 
men of the 139th F. A. 



CHAPTER XXI 

The American Legion 
preamble 

For God and Country we associate ourselves together 
for the following purposes: 

To uphold and defend the Constitution of the United 
States of America; to maintain law and order; to foster 
and perpetuate a 100 per cent. Americanism; to preserve 
the memories and incidents of our association in the 
Great War; to inculcate a sense of individual obligation 
to the community, state and nation; to combat the autoc- 
racy of both the classes and the masses; to make right 
the master of might; to promote peace and good will on 
earth; to safeguard and transmit to posterity the prin- 
ciples of justice, freedom and democracy; to consecrate 
and sanctify our comradeship by our devotion to mutual 
helpfulness. 

The above preamble to the constitution of The Amer- 
ican Legion states clearly the purpose of this association 
of army service men. In bidding farewell to the members 
of the Regiment at demobilization, I stated that it was 
the experience at the close of the Spanish war that a num- 
ber of soldiers' organizations were formed by self-seeking- 
organizers who desired to capitalize the war for their 
own profit and benefit, and suggested that all of us be 
cautious about joining any organization that might be 
formed for the veterans of the Great War until its pur- 
poses and objects had been examined into and approved. 

The American Legion is the one great organization 
that should have the support of every former service man, 
and I urge all former members of the 139th Field 



180 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Artillery to join the American Legion if they have not 
already done so. 

The American Legion had its inception in France. In 
January of 1919 a first meeting of members of a number 
of different divisions was held in Paris to consider the 
formation of a soldiers' organization. Plans were laid 
for a subsequent meeting at which the divisions then 
overseas sent representatives. This meeting, attended by. 
nearly 1,000 officers and men who represented all combat 
divisions and all sections of S. 0. S., was held in Paris 
on March 15th and is now known as the Paris Caucus. A 
Committee of twenty-one was selected to present the 
suggested ideas and the plans of the caucus to a caucus 
to be called in the United States in May. This caucus was 
held in St. Louis, May 8th, 9th and 10th, 1919, in which 
were repersentatives from the Paris Caucus and from 
each state in proportion to its congressional representa- 
tion, in all about 1,100 delegates. Mr. Henry D. Lindsey 
of Texas was elected Chairman and a National Executive 
Committee of two from each state was elected to take 
up the work of organization in each state. I attended 
the caucus as a delegate and was selected as one of the 
National Executive Committeemen from Indiana. 

This caucus sounded a new note in American life. 
Before adjourning the caucus, the delegates selected 
Armistice Day as the date for the first convention of the 
American Legion, and Minneapolis, Minnesota, was chosen 
as the meeting place. New York was selected as temp- 
orary headquarters. At the adjournment of the St. Louis 
caucus, the delegates returned to their home states imbued 
with the high ideals announced at the caucus and with 
a determination to organize the former service men — 
soldiers, sailors and marines — for service to the country 
in times of peace. 



THE AMERICAN LEGION 181 

In Indiana the first call for an organization of the service 
men was made by Captain Scott Brewer of Indianapolis, 
who issued, through the newspapers, a call for a meeting 
at the court house in March, 1918. Governor Goodrich 
addressed the meeting on behalf of the state, and I was 
asked as a former service man to speak on behalf of the 
soldiers. A temporary organization was effected which 
took the temporary name of "The World War Veterans of 
Marion County." News of this organization went through- 
out the state, and within the next two months similar 
organizations were effected in more than twenty counties. 

A caucus was held at the State House, Indianapolis, 
with representatives of each soldier's organization of the 
state present. Captain Raymond S. Springer, Judge of 
the Fayette Circuit Court, Connersville, was selected as 
State Chairman and a temporary executive committee 
incorporated the organized soldiers of Indiana under the 
name of "The World War Veterans of Indiana." When 
the St. Louis Caucus of the American Legion was called, 
Indiana was represented by organizations in nearly one 
third of the counties. Indiana seemed to be as well organ- 
ized if not better than most of the states. Nearly all of 
the Veterans organizations had adopted the title of 
World War Veterans or something similar, and at the 
St. Louis Caucus, the first name proposed for The Amer- 
ican Legion was "The American Legion of the World War 
Veterans." This name was considered too long, and it 
was shortened to "The American Legion," the name pro- 
posed at the Paris Caucus. 

After the St. Louis caucus, a state convention was called 
in Indianapolis to accept the constitution of The Amer- 
ican Legion, and to ratify the action of Indiana's dele- 
gates to that caucus. The work of the organization of 
the state proceeded and by November over 150 posts were 



182 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

organized over the state, there being at least one in everj^ 
county. Indiana sent a full delegation to the Minneapolis 
Convention, among whom was a number of former 139th 
F. A. men, and succeeded in so favorably presenting the 
advantages of Indianapolis and Indiana as a location for 
the National Headquarters of the American Legion that 
Indianapolis was chosen. 

The American Legion stands for everything that is 
decent and upright in American life. Its slogan is "100% 
Americanism,'* with the desire that every former service 
man and every citizen appreciate the advantages of our 
form of government, the liberties granted under it and 
that the obligation of every citizen is service to his 
country, both in war and in peace. 

The American Legion was granted a charter by Con- 
gress on September 16th, 1919. Through the efforts of 
The American Legion, the Sweet bill was passed in Con- 
gress in December of 1919, which gives ample and 
generous provision for all disabled service men, and 
includes liberal provisions for the education of these 
physically disabled. 

In making his farewell address to the executive com- 
mittee of the American Legion, National Commander 
Lindsley explained most clearly and forcibly the higli 
ideals of the Legion in politics and public life. 

"The resolutions that passed this convention are the 
most momentous in recent history and by what this con- 
vention has done those in public life will largely determine 
their course, for while they know that this is a non- 
political association and will remain so, it has nevertheless 
set a standard for those occupying positions in the public 
life of this nation and those who can not live up to this 
standard in either party are going to be retired to private 
life." 



CHAPTER XXII 

Notes From the Diary of the Regimental 
Sergeant-Major 

1917 



regimental history 

4th Indiana Infantry— 139th Field Artillery 

Regiment mustered out of service at the close of Spanish-American 
War, 1898. 

Organized as 4th Indiana Infantry, National Guard, authority of the 
Governor and notification to Chief Militia Bureau, May 1, 1917. 



Home 
Station 
Decatur 
Rushville 
Huntington 
Indianapolis 
Marion 
Bedford 
Evansville 
Columbus 
Madison 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Anderson 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 
Rushville 



Designation 

"A" 

"B" 

"C" 

"D" 

"E" 

"F" 

"G" 

"H" 

"I" 

"K" 

"L" 

"M" 

M. Gun 

Hdqrs. 

Supply 

Sanitary 

Det. 



Field and 
Staff 



Commanding 
Officer 



No. of No. of 
Officers Enl. Men 



Capt. C. R. Dunn 3 

Capt. J. H. Kiplinger 3 

Capt. F. E. Livengood 3 

Capt. Nathan A. Morris 3 

Capt. Harry Hall 3 

Capt. Tony Coston 3 

Capt. C. K. Wheeler 3 

Capt. Don L. Essex 3 

Capt. H. O. Woolford 3 

Capt. Will T. Stalnaker 3 

Capt. H. W. McBride 3 

Capt. W, F. McKinney 3 

Capt. Robert G. Igoe 5 

Capt. E. E. Chenoweth 1 

Capt H. B. Stout, Jr. 2 

Major N. A. Gary 5 

Col. Robert L. Moorhead 
Lt.-Col. R. P. Youngman 
Maj. Clyde F. Driesbach 
Maj. Walter H. Unversaw 
Maj. Jay A. Umpleby 
Bn. Adj. R. L. Pigert 
Bn. Adj. Otis E GuUey, Jr. 

Bn. Adj. Otto Lindgren 8 

Chap. B. F. Brundage 1 



109 

150 

146 

127 

141 

118 

144 

112 

91 

115 

104 

87 

85 

31 

37 

33 



Total 



58 



1630 



184 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Drafted into federal service of the United States on 
Aug. 5, 1917, by proclamation of the President, dated 
July 3, 1917. 

Assembled at various home stations on Aug. 5, 1917. 
per telegraphic instructions Hq. Central Dept., July 3, 
1917, and G. 0. 29 A. G. O. of Indiana. 

Officers of the regiment, non-commissioned officers, 
cooks, mechanics, musicians and privates, held like grade 
in the Army of the United States effective Aug. 5, 1917, 
upon muster or draft into federal service upon authority 
quoted. 

Aug. 12, 1917, the units present were reviewed by 
Adj. General Harry B. Smith at the State Fair Grounds, 
at which time the Regimental Commander presented the 
non-commissioned officers their warrants. 

First change of station of a unit in the regiment: Co. 
M left Anderson for Indianapolis, via trolley, Aug. 16, 
1917, joining Headquarters, Supply, M-Gun, D, K and L 
at the State Fair Grounds, Indianapolis, Ind., authority 
letter Regimental Commander, Aug. 14, 1917. 

Co. B left Rushville via rail for Camp Shelby, Missis- 
sippi, for purpose of preparing this camp, where Division 
was to be formed, arriving Aug. 22, 1917. Through the 
efficient work of the headquarters of the regiment, Co. B 
was the first National Guard unit to reach its permanent 
training camp. 

Per authority Cent. Dept. dated Aug. 16, 1917, Hq., 
Supply, D, K, L, M, M-Gun Companies and Sanitary Det. 
moved via traction from State Fair Grounds, Indianapolis, 
to Fort Benjamin Harrison (10 miles). Change of station 
completed Aug. 28, 1917. 

Per authority S. 0. 195, Cen. Dept. 1917, the other 
companies not mentioned above reported to Ft. Benj. 
Harrison : 



NOTES FROM THE DIARY 185 

Sept. 4. 1917 : G, H and I. 

Sept. 5, 1917: A, C, E and F. 

Immediately upon mobilization of the regiment training 
schedules were followed out, practice marches, and small 
infantry maneuvers. 

Entire regiment (less Co. B) entrained at Ft. Benj. 
Harrison, Ind., for Camp Shelby, Mississippi, per S. O. 
213, Cent. Dept., 1917. Last increment arrived at Camp 
Shelby, Miss., on Sept. 28, 1917. 

Re-organized into 139th Field Artillery on October 1, 
1917, S. 0. 15, Hq. 38th Division Sept. 26, 1917. The fol- 
lowing units were transferred to 139th Machine Gun Bn. 
in connection with the above: 3d Bn. (minus K and I Bn. 
Sergt. Mjr.) The regiment was formed into three bat- 
talions of two batteries each: 



Batteries Commanding OflScer 

"A" Charlie R. Dunn, Captain 

"B" N. A. Morris, Captain 

"C" • H. R. Hall, Captain 

"D" C. K. Wheeler, Captain 

"E" H. O. Woolford, Captain 

"P" W. T. Stalnaker, Captain 

Hdqrs. Co. J. H. Kiplinger, Captain 

Supply Co. H. B. Stout, Jr., Captain 3 88 

San. Detach. N. A. Cary, Major 5 33 

Field and Staff R. L. Mojorhead, Colonel 9 



No. 


No. 


Officers 


Enlisted 




Men 


5 


216 


5 


228 


3 


225 


5 


225 


3 


139 


4 


127 


3 


104 



45 1385 • 

Major Clyde F. Dreisbach, 1st Battalion, transferred 
to 151st Infantry per S. 0. 17, Hdqrs. 38th Div., Camp 
Shelby, Miss., Sept. 29th, 1917. 

Major Jay A. Umpleby returned to regiment per S. 0. 
17, Hq. 38th Division, Camp Shelby, Mississippi, Sept. 
29th, 1917. 

First Lieutenant Hale Pearsey, D. R. C, transferred 
from Base Hospital to 139th F. A. per S. O. 29, Hq. 
Camp Shelby, Miss., Oct. 3, 1917. 

13 • 



186 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

P'irst Lieutenant Samuel C. Murphy, M. C, trans- 
ferred to 139th Machine Gun Battalion per S. O. 24, 
October 7th, 1917. 

Troop B, 1st Indiana Squadron of Cavalry, with two 
officers, Captain Cortez J. Cobler and 1st Lieutenant 
Frank E. Long, and ninety enlisted men, was transferred 
to 139th F. A., per S. 0. 21 Hq. 38th Division, Camp 
Shelby, Mississippi, October 4th, 1917. 

Captain Walter F. McKinney and 2d Lieutenant 
Beecher K. Wright, transferred from 139th Machine Gun 
Battalion to 139th F. A., per S. 0. 27, Hq. 38th Division, 
Camp Shelby, Miss., October 11th, 1917. 

The first death in the regiment was on October 9th, 
1917. Cook Harry H. Blasek, Battery F, who was acci- 
dentally drowned in Leaf River, near Camp Shelby, 
Mississippi, while fishing. 

The following Second Lieutenants of the United States 
Reserve Corps were attached to this regiment per G. 0. 1, 
Hq. 63rd Artillery Brigade, dated October 12th, 1917: 
Conda P. Boggs, Charles C. Councell, Edward C. Engle- 
hardt, Vance P. Braxton, Russell G. Paddock, Donald K. 
McCart, Justus W. Paul, Donald K. Stier, Smiley N. 
Chambers, Edward J. Dundon, Walter P. Hayes, Floyd L. 
Hodson, Francis D. Leonard, Robert H. McKinley, Chelsea 
C. Boone, William E. Wiegand. 

G. 0. 2, 63rd Artillery Brigade, October 13th, 1917, 
attached the following Second Lieutenants of the United 
States Reserve Corps to this regiment: Percy J. Paxton, 
N. A., Fred S. Mallott, James B. Manson. The following 
Second Lieutenants U. S. R. were detached by the same 
order: Francis D. Leonard, Edward J. Dundon, William 
E. Wiegand. 

Major Edward B. Carskadon was assigned and Major 



NOTES FROM THE DIARY 187 

Henry H. Denhardt was attached to this regiment per 
S. 0. 2, Hq. 63rd Artillery Brigade, October 22d, 1917. 

On October 19th, 1917, 200 privates of the National 
Army, from Camp Zachary Taylor, Louisville, Ky., were 
assigned to this command for duty by verbal order of 
Camp Commander. 

Majors Jay A. Umpleby and Henry H. Denhardt were 
detailed to School of Fire, Fort Sill, Oklahoma, by 
authority of Commanding General 38th Division. 

Captain Harry B. Powell, M. R. C, transferred from 
Remount Depot No. 313 to 139th F. A., per S. O. 59, 
Camp Shelby, Mississippi, November 6th, 1917. 

Second Lieutenant George S. Sutton, F. A. R. C, 
attached to this regiment, per S. 0. 20, Hq. 63rd Artillery 
Brigade, November 12th, 1917. 

Second Lieutenant Beecher K. Wright transferred to 
113th Trench Mortar Battery, per S. 0. 24, Hq. 63rd 
Artillery Brigade, November 22d, 1917. 

A course of instruction for the officers and non- 
commissioned officers of the 63rd Artillery Brigade was 
started in the 4th F. A. November 5th, 1917. 

Per S. 0. 75, Hq. Camp Shelbj^ Mississippi, November 
22d, 1917, twelve enlisted men of this regiment were 
transferred to Enlisted Ordnance Corps, N. A., and 
attached to this command for duty. 

Second Lieutenant David C. Bostwick, V. R. C, was 
assigned to this command, per S. 0. 80, Hq. 38th 
Division, December 8th, 1917. 

Captain Walter F. McKinney, who had been on detached 
service since October 11th, 1917, was returned to this 
regiment for duty, per S. 0. 26, Hq. 63rd Artillery 
Brigade, December 9th, 1917. 

On December 10th the regiment was inspected by a 
Colonel of the Inspector-General's Office, Washington, 



188 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

D. C, whose report was favorable, with the exception 
of the fact that the men were not clothed properly, 
however, woolen clothing arrived the same date and 
was issued immediately. 

Second Lieutenant Justus W. Paul, F. A. R. C, was 
transferred to 1st New Hampshire Infantry, per letter 
A. G. 0., December 11th, 1917. 

First Lieutenant Louis H. Bieler was assigned to the 
regiment, per S. 0. 83, Hq. 38th Division, December 
11th, 1917. 

The following Second Lieutenants, F. A. R. C, 
attached to this regiment, were assigned, per S. O. 84, 
Hq. 38th Division, December 12th, 1917: Conda P. 
Boggs, Chelsea C. Boone, Vance P. Braxton, Smiley N. 
Chambers, Charles C. Councell, Walter P. Hays, Donald K. 
McCart, Robert H. McKinley, Fred S. Malott, Russell G. 
Paddock, Percy J. Paxton, George S. Sutton. 

Second Lieutenant George J. Rollinson transferred to 
149th Infantr>% per S. 0. 86, Hq. 38th Division, December 
14th, 1917. 

First Lieutenant Raymond A. Akin, M. C, transferred 
to this command, per S. 0. 96, Hq. Camp Shelby, 
Mississippi, December 15th, 1917. 

Second Lieutenant Beecher K. Wright transferred to 
139th Machine Gun Battalion, per S. 0. 89, Hq. 38th 
Division, December 18th, 1917. 

The following officers were honorably discharged from 
the service of the United States Army: 2d Lieutenant 
Verlin C. Goss, per telegraphic instructions, A. G. O., 
December 19th, 1917; 2d Lieutenant John W. Driggs, 
per telegraphic instructions, A. G. 0., December 20th, 
1917; Major Edward B. Carskadon, per telegraphic 
instructions, A. G. 0., December 22d, 1917; 1st Lieu- 
tenant Robert H. Peterson, per letter A. G. 0., December 



NOTES FROM THE DIARY 189 

20th, 1917; 1st Lieutenant Otis E. Gulley, Jr., per letter, 
A, G. O., December 20th, 1917. 

Eight enlisted men were transferred to the Veterinary 
Corps., N. A., per S. O. 91, Hq. 38th Division, and 
attached to this regiment for duty, December 20th, 1917. 

First Lieutenant Don C. McClelland, M. C, transferred 
to 113th Sanitary Train, per S. 0. 96, Hq. Camp Shelby, 
Mississippi, December 15th, 1917. 

The following Second Lieutenants, U. S. R., were 
ordered to Hoboken, N. J., per S. O. 100, Hq. 38th 
Division, to report to Commanding General, Port of 
Embarkation: Edward C. Englehardt, Floyd L. Hodson, 
James B. Manson, Donald K. Stier. 

Major Walter H. Un versa w, 2d Battalion, was ordered 
to School of Fire at Ft. Sill, Oklahoma, December 19th, 
1918. 

On December 26th, 1917, mechanics completed wooden 
howitzer, which was to be used for purpose of drilling 
gun squads. 

A Christmas dinner was served by each unit. Mess 
halls were beautifully decorated with Christmas holly and 
mistletoe, which was gathered in the woods nearby. 
Entertainments were staged in each mess hall, and every- 
one had a most enjoyable time. 

Pursuant to telegraphic instructions, W. D., December 
27th, 1917, the Regimental Commander, Colonel Moor- 
head, on December 30th, 1917, departed for Ft. Sam 
Houston, Texas, to attend the Brigade and Field Officers' 
School. 

On midnight of December 31st, 1917, the strength of 
the 139th F. A. was as follows: 
49 Officers 
12 Officers attached 
1559 Enlisted men 

12 Enlisted men attached. 



190 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

1918 

After a lingering illness, Lieutenant Colonel Robert P. 
Youngman died at his home on January 29th, 1918. He 
was officially dropped pursuant to W. D. Order S. O. 17, 
dated January 21st, 1917. 

Lieutenant Colonel Lansing was assigned to the regi- 
ment February 1st, 1918, and assumed command on 
that date. 

The Division, under arms was reviewed in honor of 
Governor Goodrich of Indiana, on March 30th, 1918. 
This regiment and other organizations of the 63rd F. A. 
Brigade were the last in the review. 

Marched to class "A" rifle range on February 15th, 
1918, and remained there until March 19th, 1918. Fired 
the 100, 200 and 300 slow fire ranges and made an 
average of 70%. Individual high scores were made by 
the following: 

1st Lieutenant Floyd Anderson, Bat. D - 98% 
Bugler Arnold Andrus, Hq. Co. - - - 94% 
Pvt. Ist-cl. Henry Brown, Bat. A - - - 92% 

On April 18th, 1918, Camp Shelby Base Ball League 
was formed. The team of the 139th F. A. finished the 
season in second place. Corporal Frank Collman, Hq. 
Company, held the record for greatest number of strike- 
outs for any pitcher in the league. 

April 26th Colonel Moorhead returned to regiment, 
after an absence of four months at Field Officers' School 
at Ft. Sam Houston, and Artillery School of Fire at 
Ft. Sill, Oklahoma. Captain Chenoweth returned with 
Colonel Moorhead, both graduating in the same class at 
Ft. Sill. 

Brigadier General A. Mclntyre assumed command of 
the 63rd F. A. Brigade on May 16th, 1918. 



NOTES P^ROM THE DIARY 191 

Platoon Leaders, Gas Bayonet and Machine Gun Schools 
were conducted and the 139th F. A. in every school was 
graded among the highest. 

On June 5th, 1918, Major Henry H. Denhardt and 
Lieutenant Geo. Sutton and about 500 enlisted men were 
transferred for immediate oversea service. 

List of graduates. Ft. Sill School of Fire, 1918: 
Colonel Robert L. Moorhead, Major Walter H. Unver- 
saw. Major Jay A. Umpleby, Major Henry H. Denhardt, 
Captain John H. Kiplinger, Captain Ernest E. Chenoweth, 
Captain Harry R. Hall, Captain Don L. Essex, Captain 
Will T. Stalnaker, Captain Walter F. McKinney, Captain 
Frank E. Livengood, 1st Lieutenant Percy J. Paxton, 
2d Lieutenant Smiley N. Chambers, 2d Lieutenant Chas. 
C. Councel. 

Pursuant to instructions from W. D. two courses — 
Senior Officers' Tactical Course, and Staff Officers' Course 
— were prescribed and conducted in the 38th Division 
by combined Mission of French and British officers, who 
arrived at Camp on June 15th, 1918. Officers of the 
139th F. A. of the above grade attended. 

July 8th the regiment participated with the other 
organizations of the 38th Division in a divisional man- 
euver. Position for the attack was staged on "J" day 
(Tuesday) at "Z" hour. The entire Division moved into 
the area to be occupied before the attack in accordance 
with itinerary and time table published. The regiment 
did good firing with its 4.7 howitzers and the maneuver 
proved very good from a training standpoint. 

July 27th, 28th and 29th were spent on class "A" 
Rifle Range. Special instruction courses were fired on 
100, 200 and 300-yard slow-fire range, and ten shots 
rapid fire at 500-yard range. Average for regiment 68%. 
Individual high score: 



192 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 



1st Sergt. Hayden H. Bear, Bat. E - - 98% 
Bn. Sergt. Mjr. Chamler 0. Porter, Hq. Co. 96% 

July 14th was celebrated in camp as French National 
Holiday. The French National Flag was displayed on 
Divisional flag pole at Divisional Headquarters. The 
139th F. A. Band played the "Marseillaise" and marched 
through Regimental Camp. At 8:00 P. M. the Chaplain 
held special services and appropriate thanks at Y. M. 
C. A. No. 6. The Band was present and participated in 
the evening exercises. 

September 1st, 1918, a Divisional boxing contest on 
Labor Day was staged on Divisional ball field. Corporal 
■Ray F. Stakley, Battery F, won the Divisional feather- 
weight championship by a clean knock-out of his opponent, 
Jimmie Watz, Private 432d Engineer Depot Brigade. 

September 2d, 1918. Eighteen passenger cars were 
spotted on track three and the Regiment, wifh packs, 
practiced entraining and detraining. Each Battalion 
Commander took charge of his respective battalion and 
the Regiment completed this exercise in record breaking 
time. Each car was loaded to its capacity of forty men. 

Throughout the summer of this year weekly entertain- 
ments, shows and boxing contests were staged at the 
Regimental Pavilion. Regimental talent furnished this 
amusement, which was a feature long to be remembered 
by all officers and enlisted men of the 139th F. A. 

September 6th, 1918, the enlisted men of the Regiment 
gave a dance in the Regimental Infirmary Building, and 
also Regimental Pavilion. The entertainment was a verj'- 
elaborate affair, largely attended by girls from Hatties- 
burg and Laurel, Mississippi. Dinner and refreshments 
were served. Music was furnished by the Regimental 
Band and 139th F. A. Jazz Band. 

Advance school and billeting details left September 9th 



NOTES FROM THE DIARY 193 

for Hoboken, N. J., prior to orders for the movement of 
the regiment for duty overseas. 

September 19th the Regiment entrained in four train 
sections — Headquarters Company, Sanitary Detachment 
and 113th T. M. B., first section; 1st Battalion and Supply 
Company, second section; 2d Battalion, third section; and 
3rd Battalion and 63rd F. A. Brigade Detachment, fourth 
section. Regiment arrived at Camp Upton, N. Y., Sep- 
tember 22d, 1918. Here it was comfortably quartered 
and received complete overseas equipment. The camp was 
under quarantine with the influenza epidemic which was 
sweeping the country at this time. Lost about fifty men 
by transfer, due to the fact that these men contracted 
this disease. 

October 6th left Camp Upton, going via rail straight to 
port of embarkation, where Transport Cedric was boarded. 
At 4:40 P. M., same date, the Cedric steamed away 
from Pier No. 58 amid much cheering of troops aboard. 
After working hard and faithfully at our training camp 
in the U. S. A. for more than a year, the 139th F. A. 
was at last on its way for "over there" to take its place 
alongside its fellow countrymen at the front. The Cedric 
was a British transport owned by the White Star Line 
and was next to the largest in our fleet. There were 
eleven transports in the fleet and one second-class British 
cruiser. After an eventful voyage across the Atlantic we 
arrived on the morning of October 17th at Liverpool, 
steamed up the Mersey River to our dock, where we 
debarked and marched through Liverpool to the R. R. 
station, where small steam cars were boarded and we 
were hurried through historic old England to a rest camp 
at Codford, arriving early in the morning of October 18th. 
Here we remained three days, and on the morning of 



194 THE STORY OP THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

October 21st we again boarded the train for Southamp- 
ton, arriving here at 9:00 A. M. At 8:00 P. M., same 
date, the Regiment, less Battery F, left this English 
Channel port for a trip across the English Channel for 
France, arriving at the port of Cherbourg on morning 
of October 22d. Debarked. Marched a distance of five 
miles to an English rest camp. 

On evening of October 23rd, we entrained at Cher- 
bourg and came across the heroic country of France, 
packed in box cars like sardines in a can. Each and every 
car bore its label of "Cheveaux 8, Hommes 40." We 
passed through many cities and small villages and on 
night of October 24th arrived at our rest billets at 
Ploermel, France. Here we were billeted for fifteen days. 
Hikes, close order drills and physical exercises were pre- 
scribed and followed out. The Regimental Commander 
obtained permission at this point to allow the troops of 
the command to spend the time each evening after retreat, 
6:00 P. M. to 9:00 P. M., visiting places of interest in 
and nearby the village. This place being one of the oldest 
in France, where the natives employ methods antique to 
us, and the many ancient churches and buildings were 
a constant source of wonder and enjoyment to all. 

On November 8th left Ploermel for Camp de Meucon, 
a distance of about twenty-five miles. One-half of the 
Regiment moved by motor trucks a distance of about 
seventeen miles, marching with full packs into camp; the 
remainder of the Regiment marched from Ploermel until 
the trucks returned to pick them up. Thus the Regiment 
was moved. Here was found the first real American 
camp, an excellent artillery range and good, dry barracks. 

Four 155-mm's were issued to Regiment and on Novem- 
ber 15th each battery fired about 72 rounds with these 
guns on the range. Firing was very good. The Regiment 









^^^^^^^■ktf^^^^sii ^ 






^^^^^ 






^H <^'^'~ 






■ 


BB|'-- jpp*^ 


^^B j 




^^^^HL 'i 






^H^ 


5 if 




^IHH 


■ 


c O V 


iil 


L 




Bp^M^^^Bj 


I^^^B^^^&«^^^^' °^'^ 


.'■! 




HHEr^ 



196 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

was also paid on this date in French currency for the 
first time. Each officer and enlisted man also was 
equipped with gas mask, a part of permanent equipment. 

November 11th — Armistice was signed, etc. 

Upon receipt of telegraphic instructions from G. H. Q., 
A. E. F., November 25th, 1918, and on November 30th 
the Regiment entrained in box cars once more for Brest, 
France, arriving here on December 1st, at about 1:00 
A. M. Marched to Pontanezen Barracks, a distance of 
about four miles. Here passenger lists, service records, 
etc., were prepared prior to departure from France for 
the U. S. A. Upon December 4th Brigadier General 
A. Mclntyre was transferred and issued G. 0. 8 to the 
members before leaving Brigade. Colonel Colston, being 
senior officer of the Brigade, automatically assumed 
command. 

On December 5th the Inspector General of Pontanezen 
Barracks made an inspection of equipment and troops, 
which was passed in good shape. 

December 6th the Regiment stood its final physical 
inspection, conducted by the Camp Surgeon, and despite 
the continual rains, mud and inclement weather and other 
hardships which the men worked under continuously, 
every man was found to be in excellent physical condition 
and without the usual diseases of an army. After this 
inspection the regiment was then ready to embark for 
its return to the United States. While awaiting sailing 
orders ten per cent, of the command were granted passes 
daily to visit Brest, France, a very interesting sea port. 
Here was seen soldiers and sailors from all parts of the 
world. France and Great Britain's Colonial troops, Bel- 
gians, Portuguese and many others, with the American 
"Jackie" and Marine in the majority. This is the busiest 



NOTES FROM THE DIARY 197 

port in France, and the largest Service of Supply Base 
of the American overseas army. 

December 13th the Regiment marched to Brest to cele- 
brate the arrival of President Wilson, who arrived at 
about 4:00 P. M. 

December 14th Batteries E and F, Supply and Ord- 
nance left Camp Pontanezen for Brest as advance details 
to prepare for the embarking of the Regiment. December 
15th the remaining units left camp, arriving at Pier 3, 
where ferry was taken out into the harbor to the large 
and spacious transport, ^'George Washington." This was 
the ship which the President chose to come to France on 
and on which the Regiment had the honor of returning 
to the U. S. A. 

The trip across was made without mishap. Arrived in 
Hoboken, N. J., about 2:15 P. M., December 23rd, 1918. 
The Mayor's committee of New York met the George 
Washington in the harbor and distributed newspapers, 
candy, cigars and cigarettes and we were greeted amid 
much blowing of whistles of tugs and other craft in the 
harbor. We debarked immediately and entrained for 
Camp Merritt, N. J., arriving there at 6:00 P. M. New 
clothing was issued here to every man. Christmas dinner 
was enjoyed at this camp by all. After the fumigating 
process was completed fifty per cent, of the Regiment 
were granted passes into New York. 

The strength of the Regiment on midnight of December, 
1919, was as follows : 

Assigned Officers - - - - - - 55 

Attached Officers -11 

Enlisted Men ------ 1458 



198 THE STORY OP THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

1919 

The Regiment entrained in Tourist Pullman cars at 
Camp Merrit, N. J., January 5th, 1919, as follows: First 
train, 15 officers and 375 enlisted men, at 2 : 00 P. M., arriv- 
ing Fort Benjamin Harrison, Ind., 6 :30 P. M., January 6th, 
1919, and detrained immediately; Second train, at 3:00 
P. M., consisting of 18 officers and 369 enlisted men, 
arrived Fort Harrison at 1:00 A. M., January 7th, 1919, 
and detrained at 7:00 A. M.; Third train at 4:00 P. M., 
consisting of 17 officers and 370 enlisted men, arrived at 
Fort Harrison at 5:00 A. M., January 7th, 1919, and 
detrained at 7:50 A. M.; Fourth train at 9:30 P. M., 
consisting of 15 officers and 328 enlisted men, arrived at 
Fort Benjamin Harrison at 12:00 Noon, January 7th, 
1919, and detrained immediately. 

The Regimental Commander granted passes each day 
to fifty per cent, of the command in order that the men 
living at Indianapolis and nearby points might visit 
relatives. After being in service for over seventeen 
months it was a joyful home-coming to every boy in the 
service. 

Pursuant to instructions from the Secretary of War 
the Regiment paraded at Fort Harrison at 3:00 P. M., 
January 8th, 1919, in honor of Colonel Roosevelt, whose 
funeral was held afternoon of this date. 

Parade through Indianapolis streets by Brigade Detach- 
ment, 137th and 139th F. A., January 10th, 1919. 

Mustering out of Batteries A, B, C and D on January 
15th, 1919. Farewell concert by 139th F. A. Band at 
Tomlinson Hall, evening of January 15th, 1919. 

Headquarters, Supply Company, Ordnance Detachment, 
Batteries E and F mustered out on January 16th, 1919, 
completing the demobilization of the entire enlisted 
strength of the regiment. 



200 THE STORY OP THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 



APPENDIX I 

FIELD ARTILLERY SCHOOL OF INSTRUCTION 

CAMP DE MEUCON, FRANCE 

DRILL OF 155-mm. HOWITZER 

MODEL 1918 SCHNEIDER 

Formation of Gun Squad 

At command "fall in" the cannoneers form in double rank. 
Front rank 6 4 2 gunner 

Rear rank 7 5 13 

Post of Cannoneers — Carriages Limbered 

G 2 4 6 on right of piece 

1 3 5 7 on left of piece 

All face to the front, with gunner and number one half a meter out- 
side piece wheels and other numbers at distance of half a meter aheaa 
of them. 

Post of Cannoneers — Carriages Unlimbered 

Gunner stands between left wheel and gun. No. 1 stands facing the 
gun between right wheel and breach. No. 2 stands on left of trail, 
one foot in rear of breech. No. 3 stands behind either caisson facing 
to front close to center of table. No. 4 on right of No. 3. No. 5 on left 
of No. 3. No. 6 in rear of No. 4 and covering. No. 7 in rear of No. 5 
and covering. Normally a single caisson will be placed on the left 
of the piece. 

To prepare the piece for action the commands appropriate are 
the following: 
Into Battery Halt. 

Gunner removes front cradle cover, assisted by 6 and 7. 

2 removes breech cover, assisted by 1. Covers are placed on caisson. 

5 takes out pulley and rope and hooks block to counterweight. 1 
hooks end in shield ring. 
Gunner unlocks coupling shutter and calls "ready." 

1 and 2 unlock sled. 

4, 5, 6 and 7 pull gun into battery. 1 and 2 push on breech. 

Chief of Section commands "heave" for this operation. 

Gunner locks coupling shutter and shuts front cradle door. 

5 replaces rope in chest. 
Unlimber. 

Gunner takes grease box from limber. 

6 and 7 on limberwheels if wheel pair on limber, remove mats from 
limber. 

6 and 7 on limber pole and 3 on right wheel if no horses used. 
1 unfastens security chain and calls "ready." 

4 and 5 lift on float handles. 

1 and 2 lift on trail. 

2 removes loading tray from brackets. 

5 turns hand spike spindle. 

4 turns hand spike back, 5 locks spindle. 

2 puts loading tray in firing position brackets. 



DRILL OF 155-MM. HOWITZER 201 



Adjust Spade. 
Chief of Section takes handspike. 
4 and 5 at float handles. 

1 and 2 on trail. 

2 unlocks spade and commands "down." 
1 and 2 unlock cradle traveling lugs. 

Gunner raises gun from traveling lugs, unlocks axle. 
1 and 2 places wheel mats in contact with wheels. 
Prepare for Action. 
Gunner removes sight cover, places sight in bracket. 
Gunner distributes cotton, gets chalk, opens the shield door. 
Gunner places sight extension bar in position and removes it if 

necessary. 
1 procures primers, hand extractor and cleaner. 

3 gives primers to number 1. 

1 unlocks hammer, opens breech, inspects and bore, fires one primer, 
unstraps right strap of short rammer. 

2 unstraps left strap of short rammer. 

4 and 5 get powder charge case, ask 3 about ammunition. 

3, 6 and 7 verify ammunition. 

Chief of Section inspects gun and material. 

5 opens left caisson. 

4 opens right caisson. 

The command may be given, "Action Front" (Action Rear), at 
which the gun is run into battery, unlimbered, the spade adjusted 
and the piece prepared for action without further command. 

The drills normal without caissons; for practice a caisson will be 
placed on the left of the piece to simulate the loading table in an 
emplacement. 

To place the piece in the traveling position the command is "March 
Order." At this command, the cannoneers execute the auties of "Action 
Front" (or "Rear") in reverse order without further command. For 
the purpose of instruction, "March Order" may be divided into sep- 
arate steps and the following commands used. 

March Order by Detail 

Replace Equipment. 
Gunner, assisted by 1, brings piece to center of traverse, locks axle. 
— sets sight at O and replaces it in trail box. 
— replaces and fastens sight support cover, closes shield door. 
— replace chalk, locks trail box. 
— 1 assists gunner in traversing piece. Closes breech and locks 

hammer. 
— returns hand extractor and cleaner to trail box. 
— returns primers to 3, straps right strap of short rammer. 

2 straps left strap of short rammer. 

3 replaces charges and primers, returns fuse setter. 

4, 5, 6 and 7 replace ammunition. 

6 and 7 return long rammer if used. 4 and 5 lock caissons. 
Raise Spade. 

Chief of Section at handspike. 

4 and 5 at float handles. 

1 and 2 on trail. 

2 unlocks spade and calls "ready." 

1 and 2 swing spade forward until it locks. 
All lower trail to ground. 

Gunner places gun on traveling lugs which are placed by 1 and 2. 
Limber. 

14 



202 APPENDIX I 

2 removes loading tray. 

5 turns handspike spindle. 

4 turns handspike down and 5 locks it. 
2 returns loading tray to brackets. 

6 and 7 on limber wheel pair present, 

6 and 7 on pole if no horses used, 3 on limber wheel. 

4 and 5 on float handles. 
1 and 2 on trail. 

1 calls "ready" and all lift. 
1 engages security chain and pintle ring. 
Gunner returns grease box to limber. 
6 and 7 replace mats. 
March Order. 

5 removes rope and pulley from chest and pulley and hook in 
breech eye bolt of counter weight. 

1 engages hook in rings of security weight. 

Gunner opens front door of cradle and unlocks coupling shutter 

and calls "ready." 
Chief of Section commands "heave," 4, 5, 6 and 7 pull on rope. 
Gunner locks coupling shutter and closes front cradle door. 
1 and 2 lock sled of cradle. 
5 replaces rope in chest. 
1 and 2 replace breech cover. 
Gunner, 6 and 7 replace cradle front cover. 

To Move the Gun by Hand 
Chief of Section at handspike directs movement. 
Gunner and 3 at wheels. 
4 and 5 at spade handle. 
1, 2, 6 and 7 on drag ropes fixed to trail handles. Ir the movement 

proves too difficult, cannoneers from a nearby piece will assist 

on drag ropes fixed to axle rings or over wheels. The spade 

spindle should be unlocked. 

To Shift the Trail 
Chief of Section on handspike. 

4 and 5 at spade handle, assisted by 6 and 7 if necessary. 
1 and 2 on trail. 
Gunner gives necessary commands with reference to muzzle. 

To Unload the Piece 
Gunner levels gun approximately. 

1 opens breech, gently extracts primer. 

2 removes charge bag and hands it to 4. 
1 and 2 places loading tray on cradle. 

1 assisted by 2 unfastens long rammer, assembles it and goes to 
muzzle, pushes projectile back with light taps. 

2 with short rammer steadies backward movement until projectile 
rests on loading tray, replaces rammer. 

1 and 2 set tray on trail. 

4 removes projectile. 

1 places long rammer on sand bags, it is not replaced until fire is 
finished. 

Chief of Section 

Directs service of piece and keeps record of ammunition supply, 
verifies laying, records firing data, checks amount of liquid in recoil 
cylinder and recuperator before firing first shot, reports suction in 
order, raises arm when gunner calls "ready," commands "stand clear" 
for first round and until spade is seated, checks length of recoil and 
return of gun into battery after first shot and during firing. 



DRILL OF 155-MM. HOWITZER 203 

Gunner 

Sets deflection angle of sight and elevation and calls out to Chief 
of Section the data set-off for each round, lays gun in direction and 
elevations and refers it, records base deflection on shield, sets angle 
of elevation on quadrant used and hands it to No. 1, calls "ready" 
and raises hand when piece is laid for each shot. 

Number 1 

Opens and closes breech, assists No. 2 in placing loading tray and 
ramming projectiles, inserts and ejects primers, primers inserted when 
breech closed, fires the piece on command of Chief of Section, assists 
gunner in laying for direction, holds quadrant level and returns quad- 
rant to gunner after the piece is laid, cleans mushroom head and 
breech recess after each round, replaces short rammer, assists No. 2 
in placing loading tray on trail, uses long rammer if necessary. 

Number 2 

Assisted by No. 1 rams projectile, verifies ramming, places charges 
in chamber, handles loading tray with No. 1 and assists No. 1 in 
unloading, calls number of rounds in volley fire. 

Number 3 

Sorts projectiles, fuses and charges and keeps record of same, fuses, 
H. E. shells, prepares charges, set fuse setter and punches fuses in 
time fire. 

Numbers 4 and 5 

Carry projectiles and charges to gun, place projectile on loading 
tray and charges to No. 2. 

Numbers G and 7 

Assist in handling, cleaning and carrying ammunition, moving the 
gun and other operations requiring united effort. 

Suspend Firing 

The service of the piece is interrupted. If the gun is loaded the 
charge and projectile are removed or fired, at the command "Fire 
Loaded Pieces." Mushroom head and obturator, breech is left open, 
tube is washed and piece allowed to cool. When piece is cooled, breech 
is closed. (If firing is to be resumed within five minutes, a caution 
not to clean the bore should be sent gun). 

Resume Firing 

Service of the piece is resumed at the point where it was interrupted 
by the command, "suspend firing." 

Suspend Firing — Fall In 

One opens the Breech and all cannoneers fall in two meters in rear 
of gun, facing it, leaving all instruments setting as they were. 

Cease Firing 

The gun is unloaded at the command of the Chief of Section, or fired 
at command, "Fire Loaded Pieces." Projectiles are returned to shelters. 
Fuses removed from fused projectiles. Breech and bore cleaned as 
in "suspend firing." Sight returned to trail box. Fuse setter replaced. 
Breech, front cradle and sight support covers replaced. Piece returned 
to center of traverse. Rammers replaced. Caisson closed. 



204 



THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 



APPENDIX II 
ROSTER OF OFFICERS OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 



Camp Merritt, N. 
Colonel : 



1. 


Moorhead, Robert L. 


10. 
11. 


Ma: 


jors: 


12. 


1. 


Unversaw, Walter H., 2nd 


13. 




Bn. 


14. 


2. 


Umpleby, Jay A., 3rd Bn. 


15. 


3. 


Otheman, Roswell C, 1st 


16. 




Bn. 


17. 


Captains : 


18. 


1. 


Hall, Harry R., Bty. C. 


19. 


2. 


Dawson, Mark A., Bty. A. 


20. 




Leave since 27th. 


21. 


3. 


Essex, Don L., Bty. E. 


22. 


4. 


McKinney, Walter F., PI. 
Adjt. 


23. 


5. 


Brookhart, George L., Adjt. 
2nd Bn. 




6. 


Watson, Ross E., Bty. D. 




7. 


McKinley, Robert H., Adjt. 





1st Lieutenants: 

1 Odell, Henry N., Sup. Co. 

2. Blacklidge, Allan H., Bty. A. 

3. Ingalls, William, Bty. C. 

4. Dyer, Oscar D., Bty. B. 

5. Keller, Ora B., Sup. Co. 

6. Anderson. Floyd, Bty. D. 

7. Kreber, William A., Hq. Co. 

8. Boggs, Conda P., Hq. Co. 

9. Hays, Walter P., Bty. E. 

10. Young, Quincy V., Hq. Co. 

11. Pitts, Leslie C, Bty. C. 

12. Paddock, Russell G. Bty. F. 

13. Braxton, Vance P.. Bty. B. 

14. Bieler, Louis H., Bty F. 

15. Quentel, Charles E., Bty. D. 

16. Finney, John R., Hq. Co. 

2nd Lieutenants: 

1. Councell, Charles C, Hq. Co. 

2. Malott, Fred S., Reg. Hq. 

3. Chambers, Smiley N., Bty. A. 
4 Hines. Harley F., Bty. F. 

5. Douglas, David., Hq. Co 

6. Middlemas, George A., Hq. 

Co. 

7. Watts. Albert H., Hq. Co. 

8. Tavlor. Harry W., Bty. D 

9. Gilliland, Charles H., Hq. 

Co. 



J., January 1, 1919. 

McWhinney, Fred J., Hq. Co. 
Baxter, La Mar K., Bty. A. 
Field, Lonnie 0., Bty. C. 
Gooding, Cyril O., Sup. Co. 
Moyle, Walter C, Bty. E. 
Stearns, Carey S., Bty. E. 
Carter, Howard C, Hq. Co. 
Mills, James H., Bty. B. 
Henderson, Samuel H., Bty. 

F. 
Hampton, James H., Hq. Co. 
Fincher, Robert F., Bty. D. 
Brady, James H., Sup. Co. 
Wallace, John H., Sup. Co. 
Folz, Charles J., attached to 

Bty. D. Joined 9th. 

Medical Department and 
Chaplain 

Lieutenant Colonel: 

1. Blackburn, John H., M. C. 
Joined 2nd. 

Captains, M. C: 

1. Lynch, John C, Joined 2nd. 

2. Meyer, Leon L, Joined 2nd. 

3. Green, Lowell M. 

Chaplain : 

1. Brundage, Burchard. 

Attached Officers 
1st Lieutenants: 

1. Ryan, Thomas J. 

2. Peterson, Edward R. 

2nd Lieutenants: 

1. Jamison, Orland L. 

2. Linch, Rush F. 

3. Luthy, Ferdinand. 

4. McCullough, Joseph A. 

5. Mount Joy, Richard L. 

6. Sikes, Mathew B. 

7. Woods, Le Grande J. 

8. Barton, Stuart A. Attached 

3rd. 

1st Lieutenant D. C: 

1. McCaslin, Henry 
17th. 



H. Attached 



APPENDIX II 205 

Losses During Month 

Captains: 2. Joplin, John F. Transferred 

1. Coston, Tony. Transferred 6th. ^^^• 

2. Livengood, Frank E. Trans- ^- Briney, Reuben. Transferred 

ferred 12th. 8th. 

3. Stalnaker, Will T. Transferred ^- Meloan, John H. Transferred 

12th. 13th. 

4. Kiplinger, John H. Transferred Tir„j«« tit /. 

12th. Major, M. C; 

5. Chenoweth, Ernst E. Trans- 1- Gary, Nathaniel A. Transferred 

ferred 13th. 2nd. 

1. Akin, Raymond A. Transferred 

1st Lientenants : 2nd. 

1. Boone, Chelsea. Transferred 2. Powell, Harry B. Transferred 
11th. 2nd. 

2. Farwell, Frank W. Transferred /. ♦ . ^ ri 

11th. taptam, D. C: 

3. Figert, Russell L. Transferred 1- Goehenour, Walter W. Trans- 

8th. ferred 6th. 

2nd Lieutenants: 1st Lieutenant, D. C: 

1. Flanedy, Leo S. Transferred 1- Long, Frank E. Transferred 
6th. 6th. 

WALTER F. KINNEY, 

Capt. and PI. Adjt. 139th F. A. 



PART TWO 
History of Each Company and Battery 

As Written in France by Members 
of These Organizations, 

TOGETHER WITH 

Rosters of the Units as of Date 
of Demobilization. 



Headquarters Company 4th Indiana Infantry 

Of the original men of the 4th Indiana Infantry Head- 
quarters Company who Hned up for muster into service 
but few remained with the regiment when we were mus- 
tered out of service on January 20, 1919. 

The company was recruited mostly by Sergeant Majors 
Hess and Cross and was composed of men from Indian- 
apolis. The first meeting and drills were held in the street 
in front of the county jail on South Delaware street, Indian- 
apolis. Drills were held regularly four times a week and 
were attended regularly and voluntarily by all the mem- 
bers of the company. 

Frederick Killen, afterwards first sergeant, drilled the 
rookies in their first drill of the School of the Soldier. The 
drills were all well attended and everyone worked hard and 
conscientiously preparing for inspection and muster into 
service. 

On July 15th, 1917, we were mustered into the service 
at the Auditorium on Virginia avenue. Afterward we 
were given a talk by Colonel Robert L. Moorhead, who has 
been our regimental commander ever since. 

Everyone was anxiously waiting for the 5th of August, 
that being the date set for the National Guard of the State 
of Indiana to be called into service. There was also much 
speculation as to who would be the Captain of the company. 

On the 5th day of August, 1917, we assembled at our 
rendezvous, at the Indiana State Fair Grounds which was 
also used by other Indianapolis companies of the 4th In- 
diana Infantry. The regiment being a new organization 
we were without equipment of any kind and our camp for 
the first few weeks looked more like a picnic than anything 
else. And some of the inexperienced up to this time looked 

209 



210 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

upon the army as a picnic more or less. They soon found 
out, however, that they were all wrong. 

By 10:00 o'clock in the morning all the company was 
present and from then on we were "soldiers." All of the 
men were allowed to sleep at home for the first few nights 
as we had neither blankets nor cots, but a few stuck it out 
and with some blankets which they brought from home 
they made a bed on some straw. 

The other companies which were at the Fair Grounds 
with us were Companies D, K, L, Machine Gun Company 
and the Supply Company. 

While we were here. Captain Ernst E. Chenoweth of 
Winchester reported for duty as Captain of the company 
and Regimental Adjutant. 

The original appointments were made in the company 
and the warrants were presented to the non-commissioned 
officers at the first regimental parade on Sunday, August 
12th. This parade was quite an event and was attended by 
several thousand people. It also caused much comment and 
was quite a novel sight. Approximately one thousand volun- 
teers with only a handful in uniforms, which they had pur- 
chased themselves, after a week's hard work at drilling — 
passing in review, before going as they fully expected at 
the time, to France to fight within three or four months. It 
so happened that of these same men most of them returned 
without seeing service, but that does not add or detract 
to the fact that they volunteered with the full expectancy 
of doing their bit. 

The original appointments were as follows : 

Regimental Sergeant Major, Charles V. Cross ; Battalion 
Sergeant Major, Herman Hess; Battalion Sergeant Major, 
Charles R. York; Battalion Sergeant Major, Stanley K. 
Sp rankle ; Color Sergeant, Russell Johnson ; Color Sergeant, 



^K> 


b 


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^llai^^ 


K"^ 


^^^^^^ 


P»7e 




1 


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^Km}' ■ g 


K , 


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^iilH 


K 


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^W^' ^' aS 


i 




1 




1 




L 


^^^^^^^^^B ^ 


4 *' "1^1 '"'Ci 



212 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Timothy Henderson; First Sergeant, Frederick Killen; 
Sergeant Bugler, Albert G. Thomas ; Supply Sergeant, Her- 
man Dougherty; Mess Sergeant, Thomas Lenahan; Ser- 
geant, Oscar M. Anderson. 

While at the Fair Grounds we were given our smallpox 
and typhoid inoculations and our final physical examina- 
tions. It was here that we lost our first man. Private 
Joseph O'Hara, who was discharged for being underweight. 
Private Fred Randolph was transferred to Company L. 

On his own request. Mess Sergeant Lenahan was reduced 
to the grade of private and Private Allen D. Eby on account 
of his former experience as a "belly robber" was appointed 
mess sergeant. He made "good" and was afterwards pro- 
moted to Second Lieutenant of Field Artillery. 

On the 28th day of August we moved to Fort Benjamin 
Harrison together with the other units of the regiments 
that were at the Fair Grounds. The movement was made 
in the rain and we pitched our tents in the rain on a water- 
soaked field. 

While we were here, First Sergeant Killen was trans- 
ferred to Company F and Sergeant John Dwyer was made 
first sergeant. 

We stayed here for several weeks and on September 26 
we entrained for our southern training camp, Camp Shelby, 
Mississippi. 

Upon our arrival there we found that we were changed to 
a regiment of field artillery and owing to a change of tables 
of organization our company was consolidated with part 
of Company B of Rushville, Indiana, to make the Head- 
quarters Company of the 139th Field Artillery, under the 
command of Captain John H. Kiplinger. 

Captain Chenoweth was assigned to duty as Regimental 
Adjutant. 



HEADQUARTERS COMPANY 213 



ROSTER OF HEADQUARTERS COMPANY, 4TH IimiANA INFANTRY 

Captain Ernest E. Chenowetli, Regt. Adjt., Winchester, Ind. 

Cross, Charles V^ Sergt. Maj. (Regt.), Indianapolis, Ind. 

Hess, Herman, Sergt. Maj. (Bn.), Indianapolis, Ind. 

Sprankle, Stanley K., Sergt. Maj. (Bn.), Indianapolis, Ind. 

York, Charles R^ Sergt. Maj. (Bn)., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Killen, Frederick E. L^ 1st Sergt. Indianapolis, Ind. 

Johnson, Russell, Color Sergt., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Henderson, Timothy, Color Sergt., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Thomas, Albert G., Sergt. Bugler, Franklin, Ind. 

Dougherty, Herman A., Supply Sergt., Indianapolis, Inl 

Lennahan, Thomas, Mess Sergt., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Anderson, Oscar, Sergt., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Beal, Glenn T^ Pvt, Indianapolis. Ind. 

Clements, George, Pvt., Indianapolis. Ind. 

Collman, Frank, Pvt., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Combs, Howard, Pvt., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Darting, George, Pvt., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Eby, Allen D^ Pvt., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Fox, Patrick, Pvt., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Filcer, Leo, Pvt. Indianapolis, Ind. 

Halfaker, Philander, Pvt., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Hodgin, Ralph, Pvt., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Hndelson, William, Pvt., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Keller, Carl G., Pvt., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Lowe, Harry, Pvt., Indianapolis, Ind. 

McClain Isaac Pvt. Indianapolis Ind. 

Murphy Robert L^ Pvt., Indianapolis, Ind. 

O'Brien, Arthur, Pvt, Indianapolis, Ind. 

OTIara, Joseph, Pvt., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Patrichi Walter, Pvt., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Randolph, Fred, Pvt., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Rice, Walter G^ Pvt., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Schissel, Otto, Pvt., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Smith, Lyle D^ Pvt., Indianapolis, Ind. 

HEADQUARTERS COMPANY 139TH F. A. 

The Headquarters Company, 139th Field Artillery, was 
organized October 1st, 1917, pursuant to S. 0. 15, Hq. 38th 
Division, September 26th, 1917. Its personnel was made 
from the companies of the 4th Indiana Infantry. 



The Band 

Napoleon said, "An army travels on its stomach." The 
great leader was right in his time, but experience in the 
world war demonstrated early in the conflict that later 
day armies travel on their feet, and due to the seventy- 




CAPTAIN JOHN H. KIPLINGER 
Headquarters Company 



HEADQUARTERS COMPANY 215 

pound packs and long distances covered by marches the 
trusty feet of the modern soldier are apt to become heavy. 
There is nothing that wields the potent, quickening influ- 
ence on the tired feet of mortal man as does the buoyant 
strains of music. So it is really music that "makes the (old 
gray) mare" go in this day and age, so far as the "sojer 
man" is concerned. The 139th Field Artillery from the 
time of its mobilization has been a regiment of singing 
soldiers and in the musical activities of the organization 
the band has played a conspicuous part. The band, a finer 
one than which does not exist in the service (like the regi- 
ment of which it is a part) by its inspiring strains aided 
materially in the preciseness and snappiness which char- 
acterized all formations of a formal nature of the regiment 
and by the splendid music given at its daily concerts and 
at regimental entertainments did much to relieve the 
monotony of the long days of intensive training in the 
States and later buoyed the spirits of officers and men on 
the muddy soil of France and on shipboard, while traveling 
through submarine-infested waters toward the theater 
of war, concerts were rendered every day. Upon the return 
voyage on the President's ship "George Washington" daily 
concerts of our fine organization did much to cut down the 
mileage between Brest and the shores of the homeland. Not 
only did the band attain the reputation of being a splendid 
musical organization in military circles, but by its many 
appearances at concerts in various places it gained an 
enviable and widespread reputation for the high quality of 
its music among civilians wherever it appeared. 

Our band is unique in the fact that with but a few excep- 
tions the members were not professional musicians, being 
men who in civil life were successful business men, and 
who had followed music for the pure love of it. These 



1ST LT. WILLIAM A. KIRBER 1ST LT. CONDO P. BOGGS 

1ST LT. QUINCY V. YOUNG 1ST LT. JOHN R. FINNEY 



HEADQUARTERS COMPANY 217 

men, who in response to their country's call placed their 
talents at the disposal of the service, worked to attain pro- 
ficiency as a band and their efforts were rewarded to the 
fullest degree. The credit for the rapid advance to the 
forefront musically of the band is largely due to the untir- 
ing efforts of Band Leader Thomas W. Dowdy, who was 
not only indefatigable in his labors, but contributed mate- 
rially from his own private means toward the building up 
of a superb musical ensemble. His example was an inspira- 
tion to his men, and he has demonstrated time and again 
that he is not only a live wire of energy, who applies sound, 
practical, common sense instead of temperamental tancy 
in his leadership, but is a diplomat of no mean ability as is 
shown by the fact that he has not only brought harmony 
out of his band, but has been responsible, largely, for 
the forty-eight musicians under him keeping harmony 
among themselves; and that in itself is something out of 
the usual in brass band history. 

It was soon after the declaration of war that Band Leader 
Dowdy conceived the idea of organizing a band and volun- 
teering in his country's service. He was granted permis- 
sion by Adjutant-General Smith of Indiana to organize a 
band and with his characteristic energy he perfected an 
organization in a short period of time and on July 29th, 
1917, the organization appeared before Lieutenant Hay- 
worth, U. S. A., for physical examination and on August 
5th, 1917, the members appeared before Major P. A. Davis, 
U. S. A., and were mustered into the service of the United 
States and attached to Colonel Robert L. Moorhead's 
''Fighting Fourth" Indiana Infantry, then mobilizing at the 
State Fair Grounds in Indianapolis. The organization at 
this time consisted of sixteen men. For a number of days 
after being mustered into service the men were quartered 

15 



2ND LT. CHAS. C. COUNCELL 2ND LT. FRED S. MALLOTT 

2ND LT. DAVID DOUGLASS 2ND LT. GEORGE A. MIDDLEMAS 



HEADQUARTERS COMPANY 219 

in a skating rink in Clinton where first rehearsals were 
held. On August 13th the band joined the Fourth at 
the Fair Grounds, Indianapolis, and was soon an active 
unit of the hustling new regiment. At Indianapolis the 
band was strengthened by a number of recruits, bringing 
the organization up to twenty-nine men. On Thursday, 
August 23, the band went to Columbus, Indiana, where it 
participated in a military parade and rendered a concert. 
On Sunday, August 26th, the band headed its regiment in 
the parade which marked the farewell demonstration to the 
soldiers of Indiana in Indianapolis. On Monday, August 
27th, the organization traveled to Clinton, where a concert 
was rendered to a large audience. The reception given the 
boys on the occasion by the people of Clinton was a rousing 
one and the townspeople presented the band with a sub- 
stantial sum of money. On Tuesday morning the band 
returned to Indianapolis and found that the regiment was 
in process of moving from the State Fair Grounds to Fort 
Benjamin Harrison. The members went to the new camp 
site, arriving just in time to be initiated into the intricacies 
of pitching camp and when evening arrived the tired men 
felt as if they had earned the right to be classed in the 
ranks of experienced canvas-men. The day was a rainy 
one and the field in which the camp was located was muddy. 
These features combined made up a day which could not 
exactly be remembered as one of an exquisitely enjoyable 
nature. On Labor Day the band journeyed to Anderson, 
Indiana, where it furnished music for the rousing reception 
given General Le Clecq, of the Belgian army, on the occa- 
sion of his visit to that city ; and in the evening assisted in 
furnishing music for a splendid patriotic pageant presented 
by the citizens of the city. 

On September 26th, the regiment entrained for Camp 



2ND LT. ALBERT H. WATTS 
2ND LT. FRED J. McWHINNEY 2ND LT. HOWARD C. CARTER 



HEADQUARTERS COMPANY 221 

Shelby, Mississippi, and enroute to that point paraded and 
the band rendered concerts in Paducah, Kentucky, and 
Jackson, Mississippi. The organization arrived at Camp 
Shelby September 29th and as usual when we moved the 
day was marked by a downpour of rain, which rendered 
the work of pitching camp entirely of an unmusical nature. 
The regiment was changed from an infantry organization 
to a regiment of heavy artillery on its arrival at Camp 
Shelby and was designated as the 139th U. S. F. A. This 
was accompanied by the cheering intelligence that there- 
after the band would be a mounted one — an announcement 
which caused consternation in the ranks of the "windjam- 
mers," many of whom were not at all gazelle-like in their 
lines. Soon, only too soon, the bandsmen were taken out on 
the green, back of the infirmary, for their first lesson in 
horsemanship. As it developed the site selected was well 
chosen. Some of the members may have had visions of 
being presented with a collection of docile steeds, equipped 
with highly-cushioned saddles with appurtenances to hold 
the rider firmly in place, but such fond hopes were doomed 
to be shattered. For on arriving on the field of action the 
bandsmen were introduced to a string of business-like, 
rangey, not to say unfriendly-looking beasts, all in a com- 
plete state of negligee, excepting lead halters. After being 
sorted out, one man to a horse, they were without cere- 
mony ordered to mount and "go to it." The hapless riders, 
after vainly searching for handles to grip, could only grit 
their teeth and "dig in." As the queer cavalcade started 
to maneuver through the first exercises riders hopes began 
to fall and before long so did the riders; in fact, the scene 
of carnage which followed would be hard to describe and 
the things said would not be permissible in print. Fortu- 
nately, after three lessons, and before the personnel had 



222 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

been decimated to a serious degree, the happy tidings were 
received that the 139th would be a motorized unit, and the 
band would stay on terra firma, so the strenuous course of 
circus equestrian "stunts" and stump hurdling was discon- 
tinued and joy reigned supreme once more. 

The 139th band had the disfinction of being the band to 
play the first and last concerts to be given by a military 
band in the city of Hattiesburg. Soon after arriving at 
Camp Shelby the organization played for a reception given 
by. the citizens of the city to the officers and enlisted men 
of the new camp at Kamper Park. On that occasion the 
band made a splendid reputation which it maintained dur- 
ing its stay, always being a prime favorite with the civil- 
ian populace. The organization appeared frequently at 
concerts in town and always attracted large crowds. Among 
important events it played for in town was the dedication 
of the beautiful Y. M. C. A. building, the opening of the 
Soldiers' Community Hall, and was selected to furnish the 
musical program when Judge Harris Dickson, the author 
and war correspondent, spoke in the city. 

During the first few months of its existence the band 
was handicapped by the fact that it had not received its 
issue of instruments and the horns were either owned by 
the members individually or were borrowed, forming about 
as nondescript a collection as it would be possible to 
imagine ; but in spite of this obstacle the organization never 
faltered in its progress and during the month of January 
a beautiful set of government instruments was received 
and they were an incentive for renewed efforts on the part 
of the musicians. Realizing the value of military bands as 
an aid to morale, the War Department increased the per- 
sonnel of army bands to fifty men in the summer of 1918 
and a number of additional musicians were received into 



HEADQUARTERS COMPANY 223 

the band, bringing the number up to forty-five. While at 
Shelby, our band joined with the other bands of the Cyclone 
Division in a monster band of over three hundred musicians 
which gave a number of successful concerts and furnished 
music for a military 4th of July celebration. 

Our stay at the southern camp was marked by several 
enjoyable trips for the band. In February, 1918, the or- 
ganization visited Meridian, Mississippi, for two days under 
the auspices of the Shriners of that city and made friends 
on every hand. It was during this trip that several thirsty 
bandsmen, after the evening concert the second day, found 
that on a distant oasis double rectified camel's milk could be 
obtained at the "staggering" price of ten dollars per quart. 
After due deliberation, the necessary amount was raised by 
subscription and a committee journeyed to the oasis in an 
automobile and on the return trip, when the party was 
stepping out of the vehicle, the precious bottle was acci- 
dentally dropped and struck the pavement with a sickening 
thud, broken into a thousand fragments, causing the thirsty 
bandsmen to suffer something akin to a nervous breakdown. 
In May the band made another two-day trip to Meridian, 
where it played a concert at the theater and furnished 
music for the spectacular parade which launched the Third 
Liberty Loan drive. On both visits the citizens lavished 
favors on the band and their warm hospitality will never be 
forgotten by the members. 

During the Camp Shelby sojourn in addition to its drill 
in first aid work, the band had another experience aside 
from a musical nature, when it went with the regiment 
to the rifle range for three weeks and shot the entire course. 
It is a noteworthy fact that some of the best scores were 
made by certain bandsmen and that the band as a unit 
made a high average. It was during the trip to the range 



•224 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

that Sergeant Fred Butler in superintending the unload- 
ing of one of the supply wagons accidentally (?) passed 
out a whole cheese to the waiting arms of another musician, 
right under the eyes of a vigilant mess sergeant, a feat 
which not only put him in a class with the great Thurston, 
but kept the boys liberally supplied with cheese for several 
nights. 

When the regiment received the . long-awaited order to 
move, the band gave a short concert at Knoxville, Ten- 
nessee, and paraded with the men at Bristol, Tennessee- 
Virginia. It attracted favorable attention at Camp Upton 
and on the S. S. Cedric, during the voyage across the 
Atlantic, and never missed fire on its daily concerts at 
Camp Codford, England. On the day of the regiment's 
departure for France, it played on the pier at Southampton 
and bright and early the following morning was the first 
unit to step off the boat on to the soil of France at Cher- 
bourg, and marched at the head of the regiment through 
the streets of the city to the rest camp on the outskirts. 
During the short stay at the camp the band played several 
concerts at the historic Chateau Tourville and had the 
distinction of being the only band, in fact, the only Amer- 
icans participating in a French military and naval review 
at which a distinguished French admiral conferred decora- 
tions on a number of soldier and sailor heroes. Following 
the review the organization rendered a concert which made 
a distinct hit with the populace of the city who gathered 
about the band-stand in the open square fronting the sea. 

When the regiment moved to Ploermel, October 24th, the 
daily concerts in the square in front of the ancient cathedral 
were enjoyed by the soldiers and civilians alike during our 
two weeks stay there. At Ploermel the band furnished 
music for the memorial observance of the French civil 



HEADQUARTERS COMPANY 225 

population on All Saints' Day; an impressive occasion 
which was felt fully by the Yankee musicians. The music 
rendered during the procession and at the old cemetery 
elicited much praise from the populace. 

On November 9th, the regiment took the long hike on the 
road from Ploermel to Camp de Meucon (through the same 
old hoodoo rain) and the boys got a real taste of what the 
word hike meant without music. On November 11th when 
the glorious news of victory came flashing back the band 
journeyed to the city of Vannes and participated in the great 
celebration held by the civil population that night. During 
the three weeks' stay at de Meucon the band rendered daily 
concerts and played at several of the Y. M. C. A. huts. 

On December 1st, the regiment moved to Brest and amid 
the deep, slimy mud of Pontanezen Barracks the daily musi- 
cal program helped considerably. During the stay at Brest 
the band with the Players' Club put on entertainments at 
all the Y. M. C. A.'s in the city and vicinity, not only fur- 
nishing diversion for the 139th men during the evenings, 
but pleasure for men at the various huts. The wild rides 
in motor trucks through the dark nights to the various "Y" 
huts, of Lieutenant Keller and his "Mud Hens," will long 
linger in memory. 

On the night of December 12th the band appeared in a 
concert at Y. M. C. A. No. 11 with Miss Margaret Wilson, 
the daughter of the President. At Brest the regiment was 
one of those to participate in the ceremonies attendant 
with the landing in France of President Wilson, and to 
thrill at the wonderful, impressive welcome the people 
gave the American President on his arrival on the shores 
of the old world, and the band, while it did not play, being 
in the ranks of Headquarters Company, never felt more 
music in its soul than it did when it saw just how much 



226 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

America means, not only to Americans, but to the people 
of the world at large. It was the culminating privilege on 
Sunday, December 15th, not only to set sail for home, but 
to sail on board the President's ship, the ^'George Wash- 
ington." 

MUSICIAN RUSSELL R. LINDSEY. 

Schools 

Beginning December 15th, 1917, and extending until 
January 1, 1918, the 4th Field Artillery had in store very 
much knowledge to be gained by the school detachment of 
the Headquarters Company, 139th Field Artillery, espe- 
cially in the way of firing data, material and equitation. 
It was a hard course, nevertheless of benefit to all. The 
last on the list held more in store for a "non-com" than 
any. It was always very delightful to hear the early morn- 
ing stable call to line up and work to the picket line, to be 
given the command "Get a kit and stand to heel"; it was 
all very well so long as you never made the mistake and 
picked Pauncho, the big black plow-horse; Mexico Villa, 
the little pony from the border and cactus, or maybe some 
others no less worthy. Coarse horse flesh they were; they 
were never muzzled nor were their heels staked. The 
mules, usually feared, were very well thought of and any 
one lucky enough to stand to heel behind the little roan 
mule was to be envied. 

Equitation was always exciting, especially when the 
first sergeant put you ahorse and cantered off by two's to 
the bull ring to do a little circus riding ; one is pretty good 
to do calisthenics on a horse, and do wild west stunts. Color 
Sergeant Russell Johnston took first prize ; he could always 
do best when he was astride of the first sergeant's trained 
horse holding to the pommel and Sergeant John (Villa) 



HEADQUARTERS COMPANY 227 

Kemmeling leading him. Once in "Right about. Ho!'' 
"Villa'* lost the reins and the color sergeant turned to do- 
ing the stunts of a circus tumbler. The first sergeant was 
a handy property man and had soon helped him remount. 

Corporal Brumbaugh (now sergeant) made a fine spec- 
tacle astride a bridleless mule tearing headlong down "A" 
Battery street, and no help in sight — not even sympathy; 
only mirth. 

Sergeant Micheal "Mike" Herron is not to be forgotten. 
He was there and true to his title of colors, "Goldbrick 
Mike," always leaving his tent mates to carry the water and 
chop the wood, hies to Hattiesburg, to later in the night 
return. "Mike" had to have his lesson and, of course, be- 
came the victim of a prank. His cot was taken down and 
piled in a corner. Zero weather certainly warranted the 
closing of all cracks; and "Mike's" blankets could not be 
beat for keeping the cold wind out. To keep the tent door 
from flying open, it was securely roped. When he returned 
"Mike" aroused us all from our slumber. Such fuming! 
"Wow!" said "Mike," "I got all you fellows turned into 
the first sergeant." But a hint of wood and water, and a 
gentle note attached to his cot; and a single thought of his 
late experience drove him to do some of the necessary 
duties of life. 

TELLES AND MICKEY. 

Trip to Rifle Range "A." 

There are very few of the older men in Headquarters 
Company who do not remember the trip to rifle range "A," 
Camp Shelby. The range was situated about eight miles 
from camp and the regiment started on its initial visit on 
a very warm day in late February, 1918. Of course, we 
were a motorized outfit, but we hiked nevertheless. At 



228 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

that stage of our army career, our packs consisted of a 
cavalry blanket roll, rather light in weight and easily car- 
ried. Arriving at the range about 1:30 p. m., we had 
dinner of salmon (goldfish), bread and coffee. "Goldfish" 
always constitutes a part of every hurriedly-prepared army 
meal. After our repast came the erection of the pyramidal 
tents. After our camp had been completed we were 
allowed to rest until retreat. The next day a detail was 
sent down to the target pits to put things in shape for 
some record-breaking scores and incidentally these scores 
proved to be a reality rather than a myth. Considering the 
fact that very few men in the regiment had ever been on 
a regulation target course, some excellent scores were made 
and Headquarters Company had its share in the honors. 
Bugler Arnold Andrus, a seventeen-year-old lad, held a place 
well toward the top of the list when scores were compiled 
and ratings made. "Petey Dink" (as Arnold is called) 
showed the bunch that he could do other things beside rouse 
us from our slumbers with the ever-despised "first call" 
on his bugle. 

Soon it became rumored around the range that a haunted 
house was in the vicinity and soldier-like, the boys from 
various organizations started out to investigate. In the 
meantime "Beefy" Lawrence of Battery D, saw the chance 
of having some fun and calling together some of his hench- 
men, he proceeded to act the part of the supposed "spook." 
Lieutenant Anderson of Battery D heard that a raiding 
party on the haunted house was being formed, so he quietly 
went in pursuit of the would-be investigators of the un- 
known realm, and intercepting them before their destina- 
tion had been reached, he conducted them safely back to the 
regimental folds. 

Maybe Lieutenant Anderson had some inside dope as to 



HEADQUARTERS COMPANY 229 

who the "ghost" was and fearing bodily harm might be 
done "Beefy," had taken this method of diverting a dis- 
aster. 

At the end of three weeks the regiment had completed 
its course on the range and was ordered back to Camp 
Shelby. The day of the return trip was one to be remem- 
bered by everyone. Rain began falling about 7:30 a. m., 
and we were due to start on the hike back, at 8:00. By 
the time the bugler sounded "forward" the rain was falling 
steadily and the road was becoming very muddy. Leaf 
River was reached about 9:15, and from there on to the 
Hattiesburg road, we experienced our real mud. Mud that 
is almost comparable to some that we later encountered 
in France. The regiment arrived in Camp Shelby about 
1 :30 p. m. and had dinner, put up the tents, which were 
taken down when we went to the range, and various indi- 
viduals began comparing scores made on the target course. 
All told it was an experience that very few of the partici- 
pants will soon forget, because of the sore shoulders and 
swollen lips caused by the recoil of the Springfields fired 
by inexperienced hands. 

SERGEANT H. R. SMITH. 

A Reconnaissance Hike 

One Wednesday morning, after long anticipation, we 
started on our ride. There were five officers and twenty- 
four non-commissioned officers. We thought we were go- 
ing to Laurel, but when once started we headed the other 
direction. Each man had strapped on his back or on his 
saddle one flag-kit, one buzzer, one reel of buzzer wire, and 
one tool kit. When the Captain gave the command "Trot," 
we all wondered why out of the two hundred men in our 
conapany they had picked us, for when a flag-kit bounces 



230 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

on your shoulder or a buzzer jabs you in the ribs, it surely 
hurts. We rode all morning; finally, everyone was stand- 
ing in the stirrups instead of sitting in the saddles. We 
came to Brooklyn (not Brooklyn, New York), a jerk- 
water town of one pump and two stores. The Captain had 
a conference with the town constable,then we started for 
the river which ran along the outskirts of the town to eat 
our first meal. We located the river, dismounted, tied 
our horses to the numerous pine trees along the bank, 
unsaddled them and left them to cool before watering and 
feeding them. We gathered wood and made a fire by which 
we made our coffee and warmed our beans and salmon. 
The wagon-train, which followed us up, came in a little 
late so Cook Harry P. B. "Buck-Shey" Barrett had it 
"pretty soft" for one meal. While some were preparing 
the meal the others were watering the horses. This was 
a difficult task as we had to go down a steep incline to get 
to the river. One instance which caused us all to laugh 
was when Corporal BealFs horse decided to take a bath 
and laid down in the water, dragging Beall in and giving 
him a bath. After feeding the horses, we ate, then sat 
around to smoke and chew for an hour or so. The Captain 
gave orders to saddle. All of us wished that we had a 
few cushions to put in our saddles. Everyone was sort 
of gloomy when we first started, but jokes soon passed 
around and we rode along merrily. 

The sun was mighty warm, so we had to make slow time 
on account of our horses; but we arrived in Carnes about 
4 : 00 in the afternoon. Lieutenant Keller had ridden ahead 
and had made arrangements for us to camp by the school- 
house which was in the central part of town, but the 
Captain couldn't see his way clear to let us camp so close 
to so many good-looking girls, so we had to hunt a camp 



232 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

outside of town. While the Captain and other officers were 
making inquiries we talked to the citizens of the village. 
They crowded around with mouths open and hands in their 
pockets. One old-timer who was sort of hard of hearing 
bragged about our horses and told us that the best horse 
he ever owned he stole from a Yankee. We told him that 
the whole regiment was going to march through and he 
liked to have had a "fit." He wanted to know if we were 
going to bring our big guns and, of course, we told him 
"yes." But I think he would have been shocked if he had 
seen our guns were wooden. The officers soon located a 
camping site about two miles out of town. We bade good- 
bye to the citizens of the town until a later date and started 
for our first camp. Arriving at the place picked out by the 
Captain we put out a picket line between two trees. We 
unsaddled our horses and gave them a good rub-down. We 
then gathered wood and started a fire for the cook for 
"what I mean" we were all hungry as wolves. Two or 
three were then put on K. P. by Sergeant "Kill-joy" Becker, 
while the rest fed and watered the horses. We pitched our 
shelter tents and made ready for the night. Buck soon 
yelled, "Come and get it." We all made a rush for we 
were very hungry! The meal consisted of fried "spuds," 
baked beans, tomatoes, bread, coffee and peaches. We all 
went back for seconds and Beall and I finished up the 
peaches. After washing our mess-kits we decided to build 
a camp fire. We rolled up a couple of logs and soon had a 
nice fire going. Lieutenant Keller came over after every- 
thing was ready and we all started to sing and tell jokes. 
Some few walked back into town and came back later 
smoking long black cigars and telling wild stories about 
good-looking girls and "swell" eats ; but the rest gave them 
the laugh so they wandered off to bed. The party soon 



HEADQUARTERS COMPANY 233 

broke up for all were tired and sleepy and ready to hit 
the hay. A guard had been put out by the line and after 
a couple of words to the unlucky ones we turned in. Soon 
everything was quiet except the horses, crickets and Glen 
snoring. 

Everybody was up bright and early the next morning 
and after breakfast for both horses and men we prepared 
to move on. We saddled our horses which were fresh after 
a good night's rest and started. The farmers came out 
and waved at us and shouted many hearty greetings. At 
one farm house, a bright-eyed, rosy-cheeked country maiden 
gave us each a rose. Corporal Sallee (now Sergeant-Major) 
lingered a little behind and we looked back and noticed 
him writing something in his notebook. We accused him 
of getting her address, but he denied it. Later on, though, 
he received letters from R. R. No. 2, Lumberton, Missis- 
sippi. 

We arrived in Lumberton about 11:00 a. m. and it is 
certainly some burg. We took our horses to the livery bam 
and after feeding and watering them we ate the few bites 
that Buck had been fixing. The Captain announced that 
we wouldn't leave till 2 :30 p. m., so we started out. Every- 
one made for the drug stores and we all got a soda. The 
bunch then split up in small groups and started out to 
see the town. Many were the stories told when we once 
got started on our journey. We finally congregated at the 
livery stable and at 2 :25 p. m. the Captain gave the com- 
mand to mount. So we started on. 

The road from Lumberton to Purvis was very hilly and 
sandy so we made slow progress and a great many stops. 
About 5:00 p.m. we rounded a curve and saw the beauti- 
ful little town of Purvis. It wasn't long until we had pulled 
up in front of the Court House. There was a large field 

16 



234 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

in front of the Court House, so the Captain asked permis- 
sion to camp there over night. We put our horses in a 
stock pen close by and after taking care of them we pre- 
pared to make ourselves "comfy" for the night. We ate 
supper first — while people crowded around us. After sup- 
per we pitched our tents and then as usual we policed up. 
And "what I mean" it was sure some job. Most of the fel- 
lows had a change of clothes so we all dolled up and started 
for the school entertainment for which we all had an 
invitation. The latter was good and any way there were 
plenty of girls. Most of the fellows got "dates" even if 
some of them did rob the cradle. I happened to be on guard 
that night so had to get in early. 

The night passed quietly and everybody was up bright 
and early next morning. We fed and watered our horses 
and after breakfast we broke camp and started on our last 
lap towards home. After stopping for dinner at Black 
Creek we moved rapidly toward camp, arriving there about 
4 :00 p. m. Everyone was very tired but happy. Lieuten- 
ant McCormick drew a fine road map of the trip and when 
we figured it up we had gone about seventy miles. We 
put our horses away and then made for a bath and "the hay." 

SERGEANT CONWAY. 

Athletics 

Every preparation had been made for Wee Willie^s bout 
with the pride of the 137th F. A., so that by the time we 
reached the band-stand quite a few representatives of the 
139th were assembled there. After the customary agree- 
ments had been reached, Willie and his opponent retired 
to their corners. At the sound of the gong both advanced 
warily and secured holds. At the onset things were ap- 
parently bad for Willie, but those of us who were acquaint- 



236 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

ed with his methods knew he was merely waiting for an 
opportune time. Soon Warner began roughing it which 
WilHe endured in patience, watching for an opening. The 
cHmax of Willie's patience was reached when his opponent 
attempted to push him over the foot-lights. In a flash 
Willie secured a crotch hold and head lock and raising 
himself slightly threw Warner over the foot-lights into the 
stand below. Needless to say, Willie was at last aroused 
and in a comparatively short time Warners shoulders 
went to the mat. This victory gave Willie the camp cham- 
pionship, for up to this time Warner had defeated every 
contestant for the title. 

While wrestling is the topic it would be well to mention 
our sterling light-weight grappler, Mickey Zeigler. While 
at Camp Shelby he added to the prestige of the 139th by 
defeating every man who opposed him. Twenty or so 
pounds meant nothing to Mickey for his speed and science 
more than offset a difference in weight. A match which 
aroused much interest was one with a Greek from the 
152nd Infantry. In a previous exhibition match Mickey 
had shown so much superiority over the banana peddler 
that his supporters never doubted the issue. However, 
much to our sorrow when the appointed hour arrived the 
much-vaunted Greek developed a severe case of cold feet. 
A substitute who took his place was polished off in double 
quick time. The Greek, who was among the spectators, 
was not particularly elated over this, for in a previous 
match it took him fully an hour to turn the trick. Suffice 
to say, Mickey received no more challenges from the well- 
advertised Greek. 

Wrestlers are not all Headquarters can boast of. Ser- 
geant Pat Fox comes forth in pugilistic sports. Everyone 
remembers Pat from his decisive bout with an aspirant 



HEADQUARTERS COMPANY 237 

from the 137th F. A. Although Pat outpointed his op- 
ponent in every round and knocked him down in the fourth, 
thereby winning the decision as given by the referee, co- 
inciding with the minds of the crowd, however, the referee's 
decision was overruled by onlooking officers of the 137th 
F. A., there not being any officers present from the 139th 
F. A. to contest the decision. 

Football 

Headquarters Company was well represented on the 
regimental football team, in Sergeant Fox, Sergeant Beck- 
er, Sergeant Zeigler and Sergeant Peters. All did their 
part in competing for the camp championship. Pat Fox 
starred at half, Mickey Zeigler piloted, playing a steady 
game at quarter; Herman Becker and Carl Peters both 
played spectacular games in the tackle position. 

Baseball 

Baseball in camp was a very popular game. Headquar- 
ters Company came in for her share of the honors, having 
on the team Cook Hendricks, Sergeant Pat Fox, Cook 
Henry Peters, Wagoner Willie Peters, Sergeant Carl Peters, 
Corporals Collman and Parmerlee. All did their share. 
Corporals Collman and Parmerlee and Cook Peters each 
won a berth on the division team, which speaks well for 
Headquarters Company. 

Track 

The track meets must not be omitted. At the division 
meet Headquarters Company won second place in the relay, 
the team being composed of Sergeant Zeigler, Wagoner 
Scott, and Corporals Bonewitz and Parmerlee. Wagoner 



238 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Hummer won third place in the 220-yard hurdle race. 
Medals were received by each. Musician Ike Nagle won 
third place in the 100-yard dash. So considering, Head- 
quarters Company of the 139th F. A. has shown that sol- 
diering is not the only thing it can do. 

The Advance School Detachment 

The orders for the advance school detachment to leave, 
came while a part of the regiment was on a maneuver 
selecting positions on Bunker Hill near Brooklyn. It was 
on September 6, 1918, that First Sergeant Peters com- 
mandeered a truck and took the telegraphic orders to the 
C. 0. at B. H. about 10:30 p. m. It is needless to say that 
the detachment was jubilant and three days later it left 
for Camp Mills, New York. The men composing this ad- 
vance detail were men that specialized along certain lines 
and were experts in their work. Sergeant-Major Meyers, 
Sergeant Sallee, Sergeant Beall, Sergeant Fox, Sergeant 
Gross, Sergeant Londe, Sergeant Becker, Corporal Reese 
(now sergeant) were on the reconnaisance end of the work. 
Sergeant Pope and Corporal Scott held down the telephone 
part, and Corporal Conway (later sergeant). Corporal 
Green, Corporal Mienschwander and Corporal Parmerlee 
were the radio men. Mechanician Harold Hummer was the 
material expert sent with the detachment. These men 
together with the advance details from other organizations 
in the regiment and the division boarded their train at 
Camp Shelby about 4:00 p. m. Monday September 9, and 
were soon on the first lap of the long- wished for journey. 
They were more than glad to leave the sunny southland for 
the camp near the white lights of li'l ole Broadway. The 
first stop of their special train was Meridian, Mississippi. 
A final inventory showed that the advance detachment was 



HEADQUARTERS COMPANY 239 

composed of 160 officers and 180 enlisted men. Owing to 
the small size of the detachment the men were allowed more 
privileges than a larger unit would have had. Every town 
where a long stop was made, the boys were allowed to 
detrain and take a turn around the town. Chattanooga, 
Tenn. ; Bristol, Tennessee- Virginia, and Roanoke, Virginia, 
were the principal stops and at each place the boys were 
tendered a cordial welcome. Arriving in Jersey City, N. J., 
on September 12, the detachment crossed the Hudson to 
Long Island and from there to Camp Mills where they 
were made "comfy." One of the contributing factors to 
Camp Mills, was little Jerusalem, a Jewish colony, situated 
about three hundred yards from the camp. The stores in 
this colony contained a variety not equaled by the famous 
Heinz "57" and any thing from a toothpick to a crowbar 
could be purchased. The "whirly-girly" burlesque show 
in Jerusalem was an ever-interesting spectacle for the ad- 
vance detachment boys and for the small sum of fifty cents 
one could see almost anything upon which his sense of 
modesty allowed him to gaze. It wasn't long though until 
even the interpreters of Cleopatra lost their attraction for 
former Camp Shelby warriors and when passes were 
granted, they turned their faces toward the white way 
and proceeded to give the New Yorkers an optical treat 
with their clanking hob-nails and overseas caps. The tailor 
shops did a remarkable business remodeling the ill-fitting 
issue uniforms. The detachment had practically no work 
to do, but as passes were granted every day, they found 
other things to occupy their hours. 

It is rumored that a certain "select" bunch from Head- 
quarters Company allowed their mess kits to become rusty 
from lack of use, because mess kits would have been en- 
tirely out of place in Delmonico's. Eighteen days of this 



240 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

riotous living had some of the boys either looking like 
"vets** back from the front or victims of the gout. Every- 
one voted that these were the best eighteen days they ever 
spent in the army. October 1st dawned with a drizzling 
rain and the boys rolled their packs at 4:00 a. m., hiked to 
the L. I. railway and started on another leg of their jour- 
new which led to the Hoboken docks. Boarding H. B. M. 
Ship Aquitania, this being an English vessel and one of the 
largest afloat, the boys considered themselves lucky. They 
were quartered on Deck "4" in miniature staterooms for 
two. Being their first time on a trans-Atlantic liner, the 
boys were naturally curious and investigated every nook 
and comer of the vessel. On October 2 at 3 :40 p. m. the 
Aquitania pointed her nose eastward and by dark was well 
on the way overseas. 

The first two days on the ocean were very calm and there 
wasn't much seasickness. After the first two days the 
sea became heavy and most of the boys had queer feelings 
inside. But the good part of this was the double rations, 
three meals a day — down, and three — up. 

Each one had his favorite fish to feed and did the job 
in good style. Upon the seventh day all hands had the 
pleasure of feasting their eyes on the terra-firma of Eng- 
land. To be exact, the time for the entire voyage was six 
days and eighteen hours. 

Landing in Southampton in a typical English fog, they 
marched through the town, about four or five miles into the 
country to a rest camp, where bully beef, hard tack and 
coffee tasted like nectar and ambrosia after the "chow" on 
the boat. The men were quartered thirty to a tent, which 
made moving around next to impossible, and if one wanted 
to turn over in bed all had to do likewise. The beds were 
"downy" beds, the kind where you put your blankets down 



HEADQUARTERS COMPANY 241 

on the bare floor. The following morning orders came to 
proceed to Le Havre, France. Loading on a channel boat, 
at 4 : 00 p. m., stacked like sardines, we crossed the Channel 
and landed at Le Havre at 2:00 a. m. Disembarkation of 
the troops was forbidden until daybreak and the boys had 
to retain their cramped positions on the packet till 
dawn, when they set foot on French soil and after a check 
roll call, proceeded to another rest camp. Nobody has ever 
been able to find why these camps are called rest camps. 
For none that I have ever seen entertained the slightest 
hope of rest and many a morning I have arisen with creases 
in my back caused by the slats of my bunk. Two days were 
spent in the Le Havre camp, and on Sunday night, October 
13, at 11 :00 o'clock, we had our first treat of riding in the 
French side-door Pullman. The kind that you pull the 
freight out and climb in. Each car bore the label, "Che- 
vaux 8 — hommes 32-40." Traveling in this luxurious style 
for two days and nights we arrived at Chatillion sur Seine 
on October 15, to find that by some mistake we had been sent 
miles out of our way. Here we detrained and marched 
through the historic old town to an infantry training camp 
where we received our first warm meal in several days. A 
few hours spent in this place and after transferring tons of 
baggage from one train to another, we again started to an 
unknown destination on a fast French freight. This time 
we had first-class coaches coupled to a freight and our 
traveling was more pleasant. 

Three days and nights of this traveling, stopping at 
almost every crossroad, we landed at Vannes near Camp 
de Meucon, where we were to take up our course of study. 
At one of the stops on the way to Vannes, Sergeant Con- 
way detrained and before he could get aboard, the train 
had started, and so did "Connie," and after chasing the 



242 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

last car he succeeded in overtaking it, thereby saving him- 
self the inconvenience of a two-hundred-mile walk. While 
attending the schools at Meucon the detachment was tem- 
porarily attached to the 112th F. A. and quartered in that 
organization's infirmary. Our men did excellent work in 
school and when the final exam came everyone had a very 
high grade. It was a happy day for the detachment when 
their own regiment came to Meucon and they knew that tney 
would soon be quartered and rationed with old comrades. 
Having been separated for more than two months, it 
was only proper that a fitting celebration should be held 
in honor of the reunion and a nearby debitant was chosen 
for the celebration. 

Going Overseas 

The 19th day of September, 1918, with its clear sky 
and warm air was ideal for the occasion. It marked the 
departure of Headquarters Company from Camp Shelby 
on the first lap of their long-expected journey across the 
sea for an active part in the world war. 

With light hearts and heavy packs the company did 
squads right for the last time in the old company street 
at Camp Shelby which had been their training camp for a 
year and had almost become sacred. They mounted the 
Pullmans in perfect order, but it was a solemn affair be- 
cause of the secrecy of the movement of troops. In fact, it 
seemed that the Almighty, Himself, surely could not know 
what was taking place. 

Soon we were on our way to the eastern coast. With 
wonder we viewed the Blue Ridge mountains and the busy 
cities of the East, making several stops along the way 
where the Red Cross canteen workers were always on the 
job with eats and smokes. Indeed, it reminded one of the 



HEADQUARTERS COMPANY 243 

time grandfather took the family to the county fair when 
the C. 0. Hned the company up for coffee, sandwiches and 
ice cream cones, only there were so many more cones. At 
Washington, D. C, we gave an exhibition in the way of 
calisthenics which gave us a good appetite for the dough- 
nuts "with holes in 'em." Nothing really serious happened 
except that Corporal Murray lost his hat in the Potomac 
River and we detrained at Camp Mills by mistake, but this 
wrong was soon righted after boarding a train for a thirty- 
mile ride to Camp Upton, which we reached September 
22, 1918. 

After a few days at Camp Upton the bunch grew rest- 
less to see the ocean and persuaded one of the local Y. M. 
C. A. men to lead them to it. Well, it is not necessary to 
mention how the day was spent, but it can be safely said 
that the trip was almost (?) a failure. What a wonder- 
ful view of the ocean ! ! ! 

At last the final order came and the Hoosier braves left 
Upton October 6, 1918, for "over there." The men made 
a very snappy appearance in the new uniforms, the "go- 
to-hell" caps, immortal hob-nails, and their worldly belong- 
ings in the packs on their backs. In the afternoon of the 
same day the company, with the regiment, went aboard 
the Steamship Cedric, known only to those going aboard 
as Transport Ship No. 242. In twenty minutes all were 
aboard and assigned to quarters, more to bunks than berths, 
crammed in like sardines, but these inconveniences were 
dutifully withstood only long enough to get located and 
afterwards to grab a mess kit at meal time or to snatch a 
few hours' sleep at night. At 4:00 p. m. the tugs shoved 
us off and soon we passed out by the Statue of Liberty and 
into the sea and darkness. 

We soon learned that Hoover is a good advertiser. The 



244 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

English aboard ship practiced economy on us, anyway. 
For the first three days it did not matter very much, for 
every three meals served we got three more — three going 
down and three coming up. After this though pies, at one 
dollar per were cheap and any time after meal time his 
Royal Majesty's boys could sell many sandwiches. Aboard 
with us was a colored regiment. The exclamations from 
these boys were various. One expressed his sentiments 
when he said he was going to cross the bridge coming back 
by the way of New Orleans. Another ventured he would 
give both his feet for just enough ground to do an about 
face on. 

The trip was hardly more or less marred until 10 :20 p. m., 
October 16, when, to our fullest consternation, the boat 
drills and extra wearing apparel in the way of life savers 
jackets were of all avail, and we received an awful shock. 
TORPEDOED ! But all men came to their senses and im- 
mediately assembled at their life boats, resigning them- 
selves to their seeming fate of a plunge in the icy water. 
But it was soon learned that no harm resulted except dam- 
age to the rudder of the boat and otherwise giving us a 
perilous feeling. In the instant of the most peril First 
Sergeant Peters inspected the Submarine Outlook Guard, 
composed of ninety-eight Headquarters men, and found 
all faithfully stationed at their post. All excitement soon 
passed and we came to anchor at 2:00 a. m., October 17. 
At daybreak the Cedric proceeded up the River Mersey at 
Liverpool and at 2:00 p. m. we debarked. In Liverpool 
we were met by a gentleman on horse. This man had a 
duke-like appearance and wore a Happy Hooligan hat. 
It certainly did look as if he were some noted personage 
until he happened to expose a red bandana. He was only 
a "Bobby" to guide us to the railroad station. The march, 



HEADQUARTERS COMPANY 245 

with packs on backs, over cobble stones, crooked hilly 
streets to the station was a weary task — not even the Eng- 
lish band with all their horns could lighten our burden. 
After the Red Cross had given us a bite to eat and we had 
boarded a queer little train of cars, with side doors and 
compartments for eight, we went on our way through Eng- 
land, a beautiful country. It made one think of many gar- 
dens, the fields were only patches, and each surrounded by 
a hedge. The buildings were all constructed either of brick 
or stone. 

Dark soon came and several hours' riding brought us to 
a stop after midnight and a thirty-minute hike to a rest 
camp — Camp Codford, England. At this point it seemed 
that the farther we went the more hardships and more the 
realization that we were nearing the seat of war. At 1 :00 
p. m. blankets were issued and here for the first time we 
used dead men's blankets. Blood bore out the truth. After 
a little sight seeing during the four days here, we left 
camp at 5 :00 a. m., boarded a train and arrived at South- 
ampton at 8:00 a. m. the same day. After a weary wait 
on the dock until 5 :00 p. m. we went on board the "Maxine," 
a small transport used in the English Channel. At 10:00 
p. m. we were off across the Channel to France and 
anchored in the harbor at Cherbourg at 2 :00 a. m., October 
22. We landed at Cherbourg at 8:00 a. m. and marched 
through Cherbourg five miles under packs to a rest camp. 

Words cannot describe this rest camp with its tents for 
ten, compulsory shower baths, not to mention that this 
was our first experience with French mud. Nothing rested 
here but our stomachs and we were more than glad to leave 
in twenty-four hours. We now came to a unique part of 
our travel in France. We learned what the word "Pull- 
man" meant after riding several hundred miles French 



246 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

fashion. Their Pullmans are the side door kind, for eight 
horses or forty men. 

Everyone thought we were going directly to the front, 
but at Le Mans we changed direction and proceeded west- 
ward to Ploermel where we spent several weeks in billets 
studying French customs and "home life. Each man soon 
found his favorite place where he spent his evenings. By 
this time we were beginning to learn a few French words, 
such as "Oui," "Ou la la," "Vin blanc," and "Finis." We 
were quartered in an old convent, fourth floor up. Here 
were entanglements of ropes and shelter tents, the purpose 
of which was to keep influenza germs from spreading, but 
they caused many a man to use language which would not 
look good in print. Each day we took a hike to prepare 
us for the strenuous hikes ahead of us. Several times we 
went to a small lake to bathe and wash clothes. We spent 
many interesting hours studying places of interest in this 
ancient town. Some of the boys have as souvenirs, bones 
taken from some of the old walls of the town during a sight- 
seeing tour of the town with the Chaplain. 

From Ploermel we moved to Camp de Meucon. The trans- 
portation was one of the motorized hikes for which this 
organization is famous. We were glad to reach this camp, 
which was under American control and were all set for real 
work when "Le guerre a fini." Although we did undergo 
a gas attack and won the day at Tredec Heights with the 
155 MM., nothing else out of the ordinary happened with 
a few exceptions — the establishment of a Hoosier school; 
and the accidental use of champagne for hair tonic — some 
did have a great love for champagne. At least that is the 
report from "Cognac" front by a party of non-coms, but 
the individual reports were so conflicting that nothing 
can be authentically related here on the subject. 



HEADQUARTERS COMPANY 247 

After enjoying a real American Thanksgiving dinner 
we moved to **Camp de Mud" — in other words, Pontanezen 
Barracks at Brest where we were to await transportation 
to the U. S. A. Here we were temporarily transferred to 
a labor battalion and came in for our share of detail work. 
On Friday, December 13, 1918, the President was honored 
by our presence upon his arrival at Brest. The following 
Sunday we boarded his ship '"T'he George Washington," and 
at 2 :00 p. m. the same day we were HOMEWARD BOUND. 

SERGEANT CARL J. BRUMBAUGH, 
SERGEANT OSCAR K. ZEIGLER. 



Our Bit 

Since the Kaiser's downfall and the war a lost art, 
It would seem rather fitting some history to start, 
So kindly excuse this effort of mine 
And I'll endeavor to picture the history in rhyme. 

After months of training, aggravation, and toil, 

Old Headquarters Company finally reached foreign soil. 

Though we arrived a bit late to see any action 

We waded enough mud to drive one to distraction. 

The rest camps were lovely and the weather a bit chilly 

As we traveled in box cars and fed on Corn Willie. 

When we arrived at Camp Meucon and the Armistice was 

signed 
It was then that the regiment became educationally inclined, 

So the Colonel picked men with intelligent domes 
And put them to work on the Headquarters bones. 
The scholars were doing exceptionally well 
Until ordered to move, then the morale fell. 

And from that day to this very few ever fail 

To use every means to beat a detail. 

And now that we're back in the U. S. A., 

Patiently waiting for the final day — 

When the Colonel shouts, "Pass in review," 

We'll all grab our discharge and make a skiddoo. 



HEADQUARTERS COMPANY 249 



ROSTEK OF HEADQUARTERS COMPANY, 139TH F. A. 

January 1, 1919 

Captain John H. Kiplinger, Rushville, Ind., transferj-ed Dec. 12, 1918, 
to Army of Occupation. 

1st Lieut, William A. Kreber, Indianapolis, Ind 

1st Lieut. Conda P. Boggs, Cleveland, Ohio. 

1st Lieut. Quincy T. Young, Cleveland, Ohio. 

1st Lieut. John R. Finney, Attica, Ind. 

2d Lieut. Charles C. Councell, Marion Ind. 

2d Lieut. David Douglass, Brownwood, Texas. 

2d Lieut. George A. Middleraas, Cambridge, Mass. 

2d Lieut. Albert H. Watts, East Chicago, Ind. 

2d Lieut. Charles H. Gilliland, Valparaiso, Ind. 

2d Lieut. Fred J. McWhinney. 

2d Lieut. Howard C. Carter, Hartford, Conn. 

2d Lieut. James H. Hampton. 

Cross, Charles Y., Sergt. Maj. (Regt.), 1615 W. Morris street, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind. 

Murphy, Robert L., Sergt. Maj. (Per'l.), 330 Lincoln street, Indianapo- 
lis, Ind. 

Hess, Herman, Sergt. Maj. (Bn.), 1308 E. Ohio street, Indianapolis, Ind, 

Meyer, Jacob, Sergt. Maj. (Bn.), 2427^/^ Central avenue, Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

Sallee, Hartford, Sergt. Maj. (Bn.) , Greensburg, Ind. 

Peters, Carl, 1st Sergt., 123 Central avenue, Connersville, Ind. 

Fawcett, Oliver, Color Sergt., 633 E. Second street, Columbus, Ind. 

McCoy, Michael, Color Sergt., 436 Cottage avenue, Rushville, Ind. 

Dougherty, Herman A., Supply Sergt., Shoals, Ind. 

Price, Thomas Y., Mess Sergt., 523 E. North street, Greensburg, Ind. 

Davidson, Shirley, Sergt., 401 N. Sixth street, Boonville, Ind. 

Conway, Robert R., Sergt., 117 W. Fourth street. Rushville, Ind. 

Brumbaugh, Carl J., Sergt., Route No. 5, Huntington, Ind. 

Kleopfer, Herman, Sergt., Route No. 1, Kent, Ind. 

Rawllngs, John W., Sergt., 2306 Ninth street. Meridian, Miss. 

Smith, Lyle D., Sergt., Bainbridge, Ind. 

Reese, Clifford T., Sergt., Laurel, Ind. 

Zeigler, Oscar K., Sergt., 736 Etna avenue, Huntington, Ind. 

Becker, Herman J., Sergt., 608 Oak street, Huntington, Ind. 

Beall, Glenn T., Sergt., 1508 Ashland avenue, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Grose, Glen, Sergt., Clarksburg, Ind. 

Fox, Patrick F., Sergt., 464 Agnes street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Ball, Henrj', Corp., Arlington. Ind. 

Bonewitz, Alfred. G., Corp., Mt. Etna, Ind. 

Briner, Kenneth, Corp., Huntington, Ind. 

Bmner, Frank E., Corp., Cordova, 111. 

Callison, Ralph, Corp., Route No. 9, Huntington, Ind. 

Cossairt, Otto C, Corp., Poneto, Ind. 

Collman, Frank E., Corp., Crothersville, Ind. 

Davis, George A., Corp., 612 E. Main street, Washington, Ind. 

Firth, John C, Corp., Kingston Mines, 111. 

Freds, Carl J., Corp., Route No. 2, Markle, Ind. 

Fultz, Ira, Corp., 816 N. Oliver street, Rushville, Ind. 

Funk, Everett L., Corp., South Bartonville, III. 

Greene, Donald E., Corp., 1305 W. Macon street, Decatur, 111. 

Gerdes, John D., Corp., Mt. Olive, 111. 

Giltner, Lou Wn Corp., 250 S. Sherman Drive, Indianapolis, Ind. 
17 



250 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Harrey, Herbert, Corp., Route No. 6, Wabash, Ind. 

Harrey, Clarence G., Corp., Norris, Miss. 

Heidwald, Carl D^ Corp., Chenoa, 111. 

Hudelson, William L., Corp., 1110 N. La Salle street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Heiniger, George, Corp., Vera Cruz, Ind. 

Koontz, Alfred C, Corp., Roanoke, Ind. 

Kraus, Earl, Corp., 813 Walnut street, Connersville, Ind. 

Lowry, Edgar L., Corp., Route No. 2, Keystone, Ind. 

Minniear, Joseph H^ Corp., Route No. 5, Connersville, Ind. 

Murray, Ray Vm Corp.. Route No. 5, Huntington, Ind. 

Oakley, Roy J^ Corp., Route No. 7, Greensburg, Ind. 

Parmerlee, Otto, Corp., North Manchester, Ind. 

Patterson, John Y., Corp., 1223 College street. Bowling Green, Ky. 

Rish, Carl W., Corp., 1264 N. Carroll street, Wabash, Ind. 

Rittenhouse, John F., Corp., Route No. 3, Warren, Ind. 

Roloff, Joseph, G^ Corp., 222 North Broadway, Havana, 111. 

Rothgangel, Edwin L^ Corp., 834 Lebanon avenue, Belleville, 111. 

Ronsh, Herman A^ Corp., 709 E. Washington street, Huntington, Ind. 

Sewell, Wayne, Corp., Route No. 1, Laketon, Ind. 

Taylor, Norman, Corp., 268 Frederick street, Huntington, Ind. 

Wendell, Wilbur H^ Corp., Route No. 2, Lagro, Ind. 

Wendell, Ernest, Corp., Lagro, Ind. 

Neuenschwander, Charles, Corp., Route No. 1, Craigville, Ind. 

Geilker, John C^ Cook, 603 California avenue, Columbus, Ind. 

Hendricks, Elmer E^ Cook, 706 Market street, Rushville, Ind. 

Peters, Henry J^ Cook, 123 Central avenue, Connersville, Ind. 

Wise, Charles H., Cook, Route No. 1, Port Royal, Pa. 

Bauer, Louis, Ch. Mech., 437 W. Ohio street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Hummer, Harold D^ Wag., 495 N. Fisher street, Wabash, Ind. 

Humerickhouse, William, Wag., Clifton, Ind. 

Heckman, Fred A^ Mech., Ossian, Ind. 

Miller, Howard, Mech., Connersville, Ind. 

Monticue, Lyman Jm Wag., 421 Euclid avenue, Indianapolis. Ind. 

Peters, William A. F^ Wag., 123 Central avenue, Connersville, Ind. 

Scott, James L^ Wag., Bentonville, Ind. 

Smith, Harry R., Mech., Route No. 19, Elizabethtown, Ind. 

Weesner, Willard A^ Wag., 1412 Vernon street, Wabash, Ind. 

O'Brien, Arthur C, Pvt. 1 cl., 602 Fifth street, Vincennes, Ind. 

Murray, Charles J^ Pvt. 1 cl., Route No. 5, Huntington, Ind. 

Owen, Robert C, Pvt. 1 cl., Shubuta, Miss. 

Reinecke, Yictor W^^ Pvt. 1 cl., Carlinville, 111. 

Reitz, Otto W., Pvt. 1 cl., 101 W. Second street. Pana. 111. 

Reinheimer, Arthur L., Pvt. 1 cl., Freeburg, 111. 

Schreiner, Henry J^ Pvt. 1 cl., 5415 Devonshire avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 

Shea, Louis J., Pvt. 1 cl., Beloit, Wis. 

Strohm, Samuel T., Pvt. 1 cl., 1408 St. Louis avenue. East St. Louis, 111. 

Startz, Anthony, Pvt. 1 cl., Route No. 4, Lockport, 111. 

Yan Sickle, William, Pvt. 1 cl.. Lake City, 111. 

Whitaker, Lynwood B., Pvt. 1 cl., 2516 Eighth street. Meridian, Miss. 

Acklin, Lucious J^ Pvt., Humphrey, Ark. 

Ahsman, Am,old F,, Pvt., Seymour, Wis. 

Bowen, Abner H^ Pvt., Delphi, Ind. 

Brown, Lester, Pvt., Route No. 5, Huntington, Ind. 

Chaffin, Perry M^ Pvt., 27 Depot street, Gallatin. Tcnn. 

Cheatham, Will G., Pvt., Jackson, Tenn. 

Cheatham, Andrew R,, Pvt., Route No. 3, Philadelphia, Miss. 

Cobb, Claude, L^ Pvt., Route No. 1, Prattville, Ala. 

Davis, Sam 1)., Pvt., Gordo, Ala. 



HEADQUARTERS COMPANY 251 

Denley, George D., Pvt., Big Creek, Miss. 
Doyle, Dempsey, Pvt., Linden, Tenn. 

Eisenber^, Edward, Pvt., 312 Maplewood avenue, DeKalb, 111. 
Engels, Nicholas J., Pvt., 1853 W. Park avenue, Chicago, 111. 
Feeley, John J^ Pvt., 4159 W. Monroe street, Chicago, 111. 
Flowers, James Y^ Pvt., Route No. 1, Greenwood, Miss. 
Andrus, Arnold, Bugler, 1023 Cambronne street. New Orleans, La. 
Spratt, William, Bugler, 38 N. Gray street, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Abbott, Elmer R^ Pvt. 1 cl.. Mason City, 111. 
Barnard, Benjamin, Pvt. 1 cl., Raeford, N. C. 
Bivens, Byron F., Pvt. 1 cl., 1249 W. Ninth street, Alton, 111. 
Brannon, Gentry M., Pvt. 1 cl., Winborn, Miss. 
Biffffs, Glenn, Pvt. 1 cl., 431 Thirty-ninth street, Moline, 111. 
Cassell, Harry V^ Pvt. 1 cl. McNabb, 111. 
Christman, Fred, Pvt. 1 cl., East Third street, Warren, Ind. 
Coppel, Lloyd F., Pvt. 1 cl., Havana, 111. 

Darting, George, Pvt. 1 cl., 428 N. Alabama street, Indianapolis, Ind, 
Eckerle, Erwln F., Pvt. 1 cl., 405 William street, Belleville, 111. 
Fegan, Earl C^ Pvt. 1 cl., 3315 N. Illinois street, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Fuchs, John W^ Pvt. 1 cl., Byron, 111. 
Gillis, Thomas H^ Pvt. 1 cl.. Carpenter, Miss. 
Granl, John Gm Pvt. 1 cl.. 710 E. Fourth street, Belleville, 111. 
Gross, Otto R^ Pvt. 1 cl.. 1302 Franklin street, Columbus, Ind. 
Haislnp, Francis M., Pvt. 1 cl., 1314 Pearl street, Columbus, Ind. 
Halfaker, Philander, Pvt. 1 cl., Acton, Ind. 
Halladay, Lewis H^ Pvt. 1 cl., Royalton, 111. 
Hamilton, Harry E., Pvt. 1 cl., Marissa, 111. 
Hart, Frederick J^ Pvt. 1 cl., Route No. 5, Bogue Chitto, Miss. 
Harvey, Herman E^ Pvt. 1 cl.. Route No. 4, Huntington, Ind. 
Heiniger, Fred, Pvt. 1 cl.. Vera Cruz, Ind. 
Jackson, George R^ Pvt. 1 cl.. New Boston, 111. 

Lambdin, Howard IL, Pvt. 1 cl., Fourth and Grant streets. Blooming- 
ton, Ind. 
Fulton, Ross E^ Pvt., 714 W. Macon street, Decatur, 111. 
Green, Lyell A^ Pvt., Star Route, Centerville, Miss. 
Gray, Roscoe C^ Pvt., 2014 W. Macon street, Nashville, Tenn. 
Grant, Elmer F^ Pvt., 2718 Summit street, Kansas City, Mo. 
Hurd, Jules M^ Pvt.. 1022 Highland avenue, Dixon. 111. 
Jalass, Clarence A^ Pvt., 1414 Carmen avenue, Chicago, 111. 
Johnson, Horace F^ Pvt., 935 County avenue, Texarkana, Ark. 
Johnson, Harry A^ Pvt., Route No. 3, Elwood, 111. 
Kennedy, George W^ Pvt., Victoria, 111. 
Lowe, Harry M^ Pvt., Lexington, Miss. 
Mcllwain, Elmer F^ Pvt., Bethany, 111. 
Miller, Buren, Pvt., Route No. 1, Cragfort. Ala. 
Moak, Julius, Pvt., Route No. 3, Bogue Chitto, Miss. 
Moe, Herman, Pvt., Route No. 3, Boyceville, Wis. 
Murray, Harold D., Pvt., Wadena, Minn. 

Oberstaller, Charles, Pvt., 1216 Twelfth street. Rock Island, 111. 
Odell, Charles, Pvt., Blytheville, Ark. 

Owens, Junius G,, Pvt., 408 Friendship street. Providence, R. I. 
Phillips, Thomas A., Pvt., Star, Miss. 
Reynolds, Thomas A„ Pvt., Hull, 111. 
Rooth, James, Pvt., Route No. 3, Joy, 111. 

Rosenbaum, Arthur S,, Pvt., 710 Twenty-fourth avenue. Meridian, Miss. 
Schilling, Clarence A., Pvt., Onalaska, Wis. 
Schuttler, Eric, Pvt., 716 McBride street, Syracuse, N. Y. 
Seeburger, Carl P., Pvt., 1001 14 ^^ street. Rock Island, 111. 



252 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Siebelink, Eugene, Pvt., 731 Jefferson avenue, Sheboygan, Wis. 

Smalley, Howard, Pvt., Route No. 64, Ransom, 111. 

Smith, James C, Pvt., 1144 S. Main street, Hillsboro, 111. 

Smith, Roy L^ Pvt., Zeiglerville, Miss. 

Snodgrass, Jonathan W^ Pvt., 402 E. Second street, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Sullivan, Cornelius, Pvt, 1319 E. Belleville, avenue, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Summers, Paul T., Pvt, 414 Wantage avenue, Johnson City, Tenn. 

Swanson, Vernon, Pvt., 103 Sixth avenue, Moline, 111. 

Vaught, Victor V^ Pvt., 1520 W. Eighteenth street. Pine Bluff, Ark. 

Walsh, William, Pvt., 781 Van Buren street, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Wiskirchen, John P^ Pvt., 2807 Wells street, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Worel, Chester G., Pvt., Manitowoc, Wis. 

York, Richard, Pvt., Hailesburg, Ala. 

Band Section 
Dowdy, Thomas W., Band Leader, 957 S. Fourth street, Clinton, Ind. 
Smith, Horace P., Asst Band Leader, 127 N. Eleventh street, Terre 

Haute, Ind. 
Thomas, Albert G., Sergt. Bugler, Route No. 9, Franklin, Ind. 
VanderEcken, Andrew, Sergt., 427 National avenue, West Terre 

Haute, Ind. 
Collins, Curtis, Sergt., Acton, Ind. 

Gibson, Walter, Sergt., 132 Fourteenth street, Terre Haute, Ind. 
Gilfillan, Reid G., Sergt., Beloit, Kans. 
Clark, William, Corp., Franklin, Ind. 
Johnson, Orville, Corp., Westby, Wis. 

Hodgin, Ralph, Corp., 1030 N. Keystone street, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Mourey, Fred J^ Corp., Route No. 20, Elizabethtown, Ind. 
Voto, Pete, Corp., 446 N. Eighth street. Clinton, Ind. 
Campbell, Ted M., Mus. 1 cl., 317 Arlington avenue, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Lindsley, Russell, Mus. 1 cl., Southport, Penn. 
MacLane, Earl A«, Mus. 1 cl., 1303 Collier street, Hannibal, Mo. 
Payne, Hume, Mus. 1 cl., 510 Market street, Fulton, Mo. 
Weber, Henry, Mus. 1 cl. 55 S. Fourteenth street, Terre Haute, Ind. 
Bevan, Will, Mus. 2 cl., Blackman and Ninth street, Clinton, Ind. 
Corley, William, Mus. 2 cl., Clinton, Ind. 

Demaree, Mark, Mus. 2 cl., 2219 College avenue, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Fltzwater, James, Mus. 2 cl., Beverly, W. Va. 
Cline, Joseph H^ Mus. 2 cl., 2515 Wellborn street, Dallas, Texas. 
Klein, Nicholas, Mus. 2 cl., W. Second street, Madison, Ind. 
Griffin, Arion, Mus. 2 cl., 220 S. Main street. South Bend, Ind. 
Stayer, Garth L., Mus. 2 cl., North Baltimore, Ohio. 
Sumner, Claude, Mus. 2 cl., Arcadia, Ind. 

Wharton, Russell, Mus. 2 cl., 1006 Huestis avenue, Fort Wayne, Ind. 
Caudel, Sidney J^ Mus. 3 cl., Frenchburg, Ky. 
Faugust, Fred, Mus. 3 cl., 888 E. State street, Jacksonville, 111. 
Fogel, Wayne A,, Mus. 3 cl., 2428 Park avenue, Kansas City, Mo. 
Frisella Frank, Mus. 3 cl., 948 Bogart street, Clinton, Ind. 
Gericke, Orville, Mus. 3 cl., Maxine, 111. 

Grose, Charles 0^ Mus. 3 cl., 717 S. Main street, Kokomo, Ind. 
Henkle, Benjamin, Mus. 3 cl., 732 N. Monroe street, Decatur, 111. 
Lowe, John, Mus. 3 cl., 2047 Boulevard Place, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Lusk, Leo, Mus. 3 cl., Route No. 8, Franklin, Ind. 
McDougal, Donald, Mus. 3 cl., 42 W. Franklin street, Shelbyville, Ind. 
Packard, Leslie, Mus. 3 cl., 526 N. Ninth street, Terre Haute, Ind. 
Pixley, Ralph, Mus. 3 cl., 205 N. Lincoln street, Centralia, 111. 
Quayle, Ernest, Mus. 3 cl., 905*^ N. Randolph street, Champaign. 111. 
Peml>erton, Irvln, Mus. 3 cl., 424 N. Grand street, West Lafayette, Ind. 



HEADQUARTERS COMPANY 253 

Tan IVuys, Mark, Mus. 3 cL, E. Jefferson street, Franklin, Ind. 
Hammond, Clyde, R,, Mus. 3 cl., 616 Williamson street, Rockport, Ind. 
Teall, Scott, Mus. 2 cl., 1103 S. Third street, Clinton, Ind. 
Winsett, Albert, Mus. 3 cL, 1267 Eugene street, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Shoemaker, Lloyd, Wag., 726 S. Jefferson street, Huntington, Ind. 
Suiter, lYilliam 0^ Pvt. 1 cl., Frenchburg, Ky. 

Clements, George C^ Pvt., 1051 New York street, Indianapolis, Ind. 
LaLonde, Telles, Sergt., Route No. 4, Rushville, Ind.; trans, from Hq. 

Co., 139 F. A. 
Allen, Paul, Mus. 3 cl., Monrovia, Ind. 

Butler, Ferdinand, H^ Band Sergt., 402 N. Main street, Clinton, Ind. 
Cornelius, Paul W,, Pvt., 1126 Cornell avenue, McKamie, Ark. 
Gralton, Glenn G., Pvt., 4213 Lake Park avenue, Chicago, 111. 
Huber, Henry L., Corp., Route No. 1, Alhambra, 111. 
Grossman, Carl lY,, Corp., 755 Etna avenue, Huntington, Ind. 
Jackson, Clarence A,, Pvt., Ossian, Ind. 

Keller, Carl G*, Sergt. Maj., 1209 N. Oxford avenue, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Killeen, Edward J,, Pvt. 1 cl., Woodstock, 111. 
McCoy, Leo 0., Pvt. 1 cl., 406 Broadway street, Pekin, 111. 
Painter, James W., Pvt., Greenville, Tenn. 
Parker, Thomas L., Pvt., Route No. 1, Birds, 111. 
Parmerlee, Simon E^ Pvt. 1 cl.. North Manchester, Ind. 
Pope, Letcher A., Sergt., Rushville, Ind. 

Porter, Chalmer 0., Sergt. Maj., 710 Monroe street, Decatur, Ind. 
Reichhardt, Geo, P^ Pvt., 2409 Western avenue, Peoria, 111. 
Ruscoe, Herbert C^ Pvt., Route No. 2, Greenwood, Miss. 
Roth, Benedict, J,, Pvt., Chenoa, 111. 

Sahaida, John P,, Pvt., 402 Terrace avenue, Marinette, Wis. 
Scott, Wallace, S., Corp., Route No. 1, Andersonville, Ind. 
Surfas, Charles C, Pvt., Warren, Ind. 
Stanley, Leon, Pvt., Route No. 1, Neilsville, Wis. 
Taylorville, Yictor H,, Pvt., Route No. 1, Huntington, Ind. 
Warner, Everett L,, Corp., 538 W. State street, Huntington, Ind. 
Wessel, Joseph J., Pvt. 1 cl., St. Libory, 111. 
Zeigler, Ira E„ Pvt. 1 cl.. Port Byron, 111. 
Zillmer, Edwin A,, Pvt., Lima Center, Wis. 
Filcer, Leo J,, Corp., 1126 Cornell avenue, Indianapolis, Ind. 



IX MEMORIAM 

Corporal Carl Grossman 
Private Yictor H. Taylor 




CAPTAIN HARVEY B. STOUT, 
Supply Company 



JR. 



The Supply Company 

The Supply Company of the 4th Indiana Infantry was 
organized at Indianapolis in May, 1917, by Captain Harvey 
B. Stout, Jr. 

Around him Captain Stout gathered men, who though 
lacking in military experience possessed the qualities nec- 
essary in the special work that was to follow. When it 
became known that such a company was being formed, 
approximately one hundred men made application to enlist 
and from this number the original company of thirty-seven 
was selected. On June 7, 1917, we were sworn in by Major 
P. A. Davis. This took place in the offices of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad Company, located in the Odd Fellow 
Building. From this time began a weekly drill schedule. 
Our first real drill took place at the corner of Illinois and 
Pratt streets. During the months of June and July this 
drill continued, some nights as late as 11 :00 o'clock, much 
to the disgust of those who happened to have dates with 
their best girl on these particular evenings. One Sunday 
in July a day of hard drill was put in at Broad Ripple Park. 
About 4 :00 p. m. friends began to appear and the day ended 
with a fine supper and a general good time. 

August 5 soon rolled around and on that day real work 
began, this being the day the state troops were called into 
Federal service. Early that morning we assembled on the 
corner of Thirty-eighth street boulevard and College ave- 
nue and from there marched to the point of mobilization, 
Indiana State Fair Grounds. Until this time no military 
equipment had been available for our use and each man 
had shown his interest by purchasing himself a complete 
uniform. A good many remarks were made by the other 



256 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

men as they saw us appear, about Captain Stout and his 
kid glove mule skinners, but this soon quieted when it was 
found we could police as much ground and hike as many 
miles as any recruit. Our stay here was utilized in close 
order drill, getting the necessary typhoid serum and vac- 
cination. 

August 28th we made our first advance of the war, this 
being to Fort Harrison. It was here the company was 
first able to try its hand with the Quartermaster. Apologies 
are here given for our incomplete issue of ordnance prop- 
erty at that time as our stock available for issue consisted 
of the lone rifle presented to us by General Smith. This 
was the one carried by the guard on post in front of the 
Colonel's quarters and now that the war is ended we con- 
fess its uselessness, as it was long ago condemned. 

At the Fair Grounds and the fort everyone was busy 
endeavoring to raise a company fund. Along with other 
methods we gave a series of dances at the Broad Ripple 
Park pavillion. Music was furnished by our one and only 
iazz band. These proved quite a success. 

Sunday, August 26th, a review of Indiana's troops was 
held. It is with a great deal of humor we of the Supply 
Company recall this day. Four or five of our men were 
detailed to deliver to the Colonel and his staff horses which 
were borrowed for the occasion. The troops were all 
formed and waiting down on Meridian street, the Colonel 
was anxiously awaiting the arrival of the horses in order 
that the parade might proceed, but no horses came. Of 
course we were all laughing up our sleeve, for we could 
picture Thiele Goodwin and the other boys trying to steer 
these horses down through the crowd. Just as Colonel 
Moorhead was about to give up in despair, up came Thiele, 
the other boys and their mounts straggling in the rear. 



SUPPLY COMPANY 257 

Thiele at the head of the snorting steed, the Colonel en- 
deavored to mount, but as he did the saddle was so loose 
it turned and hung suspended beneath the horse. Another 
incident we recall was the many remarks of inquiry from 
the sidewalks as to just who we were. People were unde- 
cided as to whether we were aviators or officers. This was 
caused by the fact that we were equipped with barrack 
caps per V. 0. Captain Stout. 

September 23 saw us off to Camp Shelby. That day 
meant a great deal to us for we really expected to shortly 
see foreign service and, of course, one was blind to the fact 
of just what this would bring forth. This was our first 
taste of bully beef and other necessary components of a 
travel ration. No matter what was ahead of us m the way 
of travel we etarted well, in Pullmans. One of our stops 
was at Paducah, Kentucky. Here we paraded through the 
city and ended with a plunge in the Ohio. A great many 
of the male inhabitants were spectators to the latter and 
a few were heard to remark that it seemed impossible that 
so many uniforms of the same appearance could be laid out 
as they were and yet every man find his own clothes. Well, 
that is one of the finer arts of a good soldier so we were 
learning fast. September 25 gave us our first view of Shelby. 
A grand sight it was and a lasting impression was made 
on many of us. Mud ankle deep and everything in general 
very much different from the clover patch we had so recent- 
ly left. Again all took a hand and before many days Camp 
Shelby was a much better place in which to live. October 1 
saw one of the important changes of our organization. We 
were that day changed to artillery, which at that time was a 
very simple adieu owing to the fact that we were only infan- 
try in name, possessing no equipment except the clothes on 
our backs and our field ranges. With the change also came 



258 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

an addition in the number of men in company. Among those 
transferred to us came the find of the regiment, Old Man 
Beal as we called him, without a par as an army cook. It 
was greatly through his coaching the K. P.'s that our 
kitchen became the model of the entire camp. With 
Sprague and Beal at the wheel no man had occasion to 
complain of his chow. 

Camp Shelby proved to be one long stay for us and we 
set about to make ourselves comfortable. Here our real 
duties as a supply company commenced. For those who 
may read this and not know exactly the duties of a supply 
organization we will enumerate a few of them. Keep the 
regiment supplied at all times with clothing, shoes, fuel 
for the stoves, feed for the horses and mules, and above all, 
the necessary food for the men. Furnishing food for a 
hungry town of 1,500 people is no easy task and this al- 
ways was one of the most important. 

Captain Stout provided us with a piano and the noon and 
evening meals were accompanied with music by Wedewen^ 
Fox and Zoeller. The Thanksgiving dinner will long be 
remembered as the Sprague-Beal combine put on all steam. 
In addition to this we were supplied with music by the Har- 
mony Four of Hattiesburg, a very dark quartet. 

The Supply Company assisted in adding to the laurels of 
the 139th F. A. Wedewen and Fox became known to every 
admirer of dancing and good music and during the sum- 
mer of 1918 were always ready to assist in the entertain- 
ments held by the different regiments of the camp. Lynn 
made a name for himself on the regimental football team. 
Stuckey caused us all to sit up and take note when he won 
the broad jump and second in the high jump at the field 
meet on Labor Day. 

One of the pastimes we can recall was that of our Sun- 




1ST LIEUT. FRANK F. FARWELL 
Ordnance Officer 



260 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

day horseback rides, that is, until General Mclntyre took 
over the brigade and even then a few of the boys ventured 
out. Sergeant Nicholson, Corporal Kilander and Wagoner 
Huf man were three of the more venturesome ones for which 
Captain Stout was forced to reply by endorsement hereon,, 
but as usual all ended well. 

At Shelby several of the men were sent to the different 
training camps and trade schools. From these the follow- 
ing were promoted second lieutenants: Gooding, Long, 
Sprague, Vestal and Flanedy were commisisoned from the 
ranks. It is not believed there were many units of our size 
who could boast of such a record as this and in addition 
we had plenty of others who would have made officers. 

Our stay at Shelby finally came to an end and we were 
certainly a happy lot when the orders came for us to move. 
The trip to port of embarkation was one of pleasure after 
the continual grind of so many months. 

The deep interest the Red Cross took in our welfare at 
every stop of any importance will linger in the minds of 
all of us for a long time. Day or night they met us. The 
route covered by us was as follows : Hattiesburg, Birming- 
ham, Roanoke, Bristol, Lynchburg, Washington, Phila- 
delphia, and New York. We expected to be taken to Camp 
Mills, but drew Upton at the last moment. It proved to 
be a fair sort of place. Plenty of work fitting clothes, get- 
ting acquainted with our first overseas caps, and drawing a 
pass to New York when at all possible and last but not least, 
escaping the *'flu," which at this time had commenced to 
show itself heavily in the Eastern camps. Our orders 
reached us calling for our departure the 4th of October and 
1:00 o'clock in the morning, October 6, saw us clearing 
Camp Upton and boarding the train for port of embarka- 
tion. We left the train at Long Island City where a ferry 



SUPPLY COMPANY 261 

was awaiting us and right here we saw a trip that not 
many people can boast about. We passed around the busi- 
ness section of New York completely, under Brooklyn 
bridge past the Brooklyn Navy Yards, finally drawing up 
to Pier No. 61, this being on the New York side ot the 
river. Here the Red Cross was ready with warm coffee, 
as usual, and since we had been up practically all the night 
before and it was now nearly 1:00 o'clock, it was indeed 
welcome. No time was lost, however, and we soon were 
loaded on the good ship, H. M. S. Cedric. This boat was 
one of the White Star Liners, an English boat of 22,000 
tons, 700 feet long, 75 feet wide. Not a small boat by any 
means. By 4 :00 in the afternoon all was in readiness and 
we were moving out into the harbor on our way "Over 
There," the place we had looked to with eagerness for such 
a long time. As we steamed out past the Statue of Liberty 
and cheers were coming to us from every boat and ferry, 
a good many of us were asking ourselves just when we 
would again see Miss Liberty. Just' a word about condi- 
tions in general on the boat. The quarters were all below 
decks and, of course, in order that as many as possible 
might be carried, every inch of space was utilized. At night 
when all ports were closed that we might not be detected 
by light by the enemy, it was very close. The meals proved 
to be our worst cause for complaint as the British way of 
seasoning and cooking was far different from anything we 
had ever tasted. We did allow for a degree of this to the 
fact that most everyone was sea-sick and far from being 
able to create an appetite. 

On the morning of October 7 everybody was up early to 
get a view of their surroundings. It was quite different 
from the one we had left the day before. We found beside 
ourselves in the convoy twelve other passenger boats. One 



262 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

large British cruiser was in front of us and two small de- 
stroyers brought up the rear. The formation was more 
like that of a foot ball team. Beside ourselves, that is, the 
139th F. A. on the boat, there were also one battalion of the 
814th Pioneer Infantry, colored, and also an ordnance bat- 
talion. There was a total of 3,500 men beside the crew 
on the boat. Seasickness struck us low the first day. The 
First Sergeant was the first to take the count and he kept 
it during the majority of the trip. Sea-sickness is no re- 
specter of persons and from what we could gather, some 
of the officers including the Chaplain were sick. The poor 
darkies were a sick lot. It was difficult to find one who 
was not reading the Holy Book and praying for sight of 
land. The days on the boat soon passed. Little to do with 
the exception of boat drill and a few setting up exercises 
which almost necessitated a man being an acrobat, from the 
way the old ship careened. 

About the fourth day out we began to notice other boats 
in the convoy lowering their flags to half-mast about 4:00 
each day. This was found to be the signal of a burial 
taking place from that particular boat. It was hard to 
realize that death was so near and could come on so sud- 
denly, but on the morning of the 15th, when word came 
up from our little hospital on board our own ship that 
Private Fryant of our own company was dead, we were in- 
deed sad. We thought it only the grippe and maybe a bit 
of sea-sickness, but it proved to be influenza. The funeral 
held on board for him that afternoon was a most impres- 
sive ceremony. Little did we as schoolboys when forced to 
commit to memory Tennyson's "Crossing the Bar," think 
that it would be used in such a location and at the burial 
of a comrade in arms. But this was not all that was to 
befall us in this respect, for on the 17th we also lost Pri- 



1ST LT. HENRY N. ODELL 1ST LT. ORA B. KELLER 

2ND LT. JAMES E. BRADY 
2ND LT. CYRIL O. GOODING 2ND LT. JOHN H. WALLACE 



264 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

vates Henderson and Vanderv^elds. They were buried in 
a little graveyard just outside of Liverpool. Fine boys 
every one and it was hard to lose them in such a way. 

On the night of the 16th as we approached close to land 
and the danger from submarines become more imminent 
we were greeted with the sight of several small destroyers 
and battle cruisers, all flying the flag of the U. S. As the 
night came on just a bit of uneasiness fell over everyone. 
Men were ordered to bed wearing their clothes and life 
preservers. About 11:00 p. m. the fun started and as no 
official version of the aff'air has yet been given we can look 
on it with the knowledge that it was a very serious moment. 
The men of our company are to be congratulated along with 
those of the entire boat, colored boys included, with the way 
in which they went to their boats, all orderly and quiet. 

After reaching Liverpool we soon boarded trains for 
Codford. This being in the south of England, it meant a 
long journey. We had our first view of the peculiar-built 
locomotives of that country and also of the little private 
coaches holding only eight people. It was at Codford that 
we saw some of the most beautiful scenery that we had ever 
passed. The camp was just at the edge of the village and 
hidden away in the hills. The old churches, bridges, houses 
with thatched roofs, mill runs certainly made it an unique 
sort of a place. Our supply work here was very limited 
and after a short stay of four days we were off again, this 
time to Southampton. Here the regiment boarded a small 
Channel boat and next morning found us at Cherbourg, 
France. A bit different from anything we had ever seen 
in the way of buildings. The camp was located out about 
five miles and we received the first real test of toting our 
sixty-pound packs. With the exception of our conversing 
with each other it was here our use for the English language 



SUPPLY COMPANY 265 

ceased and our first lessons in French were gained. The 
very next day we moved back to the town and boarded the 
train for Ploermel. This was a two-day trip. It wasn't 
made in Pullmans or even in day coaches, but in just plain 
box cars. I guess we will always remember the marking, 
'*8 Chevaux, 40 Hommes." This trip took us quite a ways 
inland, finally reaching LeMans. From here we doubled 
back and on the 24th of October, 10:00 p. m., we reached 
Ploermel. This proved a surprise because we thought we 
were headed for Camp Meucon, direct. The regiment was 
unloaded and all but we of the Supply Company were taken 
up into the village and put to bed in an emergency fashion. 
We remained at the train and proceeded to unload the bag- 
gage and car of rations. Trains in France at that time 
were needed too badly to allow us to sleep and tend to this 
the following day. At 1 :00 o'clock we had finished the 
unloading of the cars, but we were not through as the regi- 
ment had to be fed on the following morning, so we con- 
tinued to issue rations sufficient for each battery to arrange 
a breakfast for the next morning. About 2:00 a. m. saw 
us going to bed. We found an old freight shed where 
sea-weed was stored and into this we went and no feather 
bed was more welcome. Every fellow buried himself and 
immediately put into effect the principles of camouflage. 
Next day we were moved up into the center of the village, 
and billeted in an old school building. It appeared to be 
more of a convent, for in addition there was a church and 
this all surrounded by a wall. 

Our stay here was for fourteen days. It was spent in 
getting a much-needed rest. Most of us in the Supply had 
an opportunity to see a bit of the country as our supplies 
were received from Coctquidan, which was located about 
twenty miles southwest of us. Ploermel was a quaint 

18 



266 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

old place and from what we could gather it was one of the 
most important places of France in the early ages. There 
were many buildings in the town that were built back in 
the tenth century. The town was full of wine and novelty 
shops when we arrived and before we left most every home 
was made into a wine shop. With all the wine that was 
sold hardly a case of intoxication was found. A few of 
us progressed very well in mastering the language and 
before we left we were having dates and attending dinners 
and, in fact, making ourselves very much at home. The 
entertainment given on the lawn of one of the chateaus in 
the edge of the town was the only bit of talent we demon- 
strated while there with the exception of the band con- 
certs. The parade review of our regiment by several of the 
French notables was a spectacular affair and seemed to 
greatly please the population. On November 7, we moved 
to Camp Meucon where our final training was to take place 
before our move to the front. It was a bitter pill, that trip 
to Meucon. The air was cold, it was raining and as the 
trip took about eight hours it was no child's play. One- 
half of the trip was made on foot with the heavy packs 
water soaked. 

At Meucon we found conditions very satisfactory. Here 
we were housed in good wooden barracks. The city of 
Vannes was only six miles away and was a pretty good 
place to go. Like all of the French towns it had many 
strange sights to us and most of us tried to take advantage 
of every opportunity to see all that was possible. On the 
11th we were drawing our 155 mm. guns and getting in all 
readiness to take a punch at the Boche when all ended. 
The French people put on some celebration during the day 
and that night assisted by the officers and men of the A. E. 
F. one real celebration was put into effect. But after all 




Artati<! el No't."!, Naittes 

.'> PLOtRMEl. - Vui. 



268 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

we could not help but feel disappointed to think we had 
been drilling day after day for nearly two years and then 
have the affair end when we had opportunity in our grasp. 
Things reversed themselves in a day almost and we oegan 
at once to turn in all surplus property. Orders reached 
us calling us home and we left for Brest. 

Here we found the worst conditions of our sojourn in 
France. Mud everywhere. It rained every day. We were 
stationed at Pontanezen Barracks. These were used by 
Napoleon. Our duties here were notso many. The marines 
had charge of the messing so, of course, that relieved us 
of that. We were obliged to floundei* about in the mud and 
slush to draw fuel. After being among the chosen few to 
greet the ^President upon his arrival we were more than 
glad to hear that orders had arrived calling for our embark- 
ing upon his boat, S. S. George Washington. Most of us 
possessed all the souvenirs that we could carry. They con- 
sisted of various articles from aprons to cognac. Little 
t;ook place on the way home from the ordinary so far as we 
:were concerned. It will be many days until any of us see 
a sight that was quite so good as Miss Liberty as we came 
into New York harbor. One of the first real rest camps, 
of which one hears so much about in France, was reached 
when we arrived at Camp Merritt, New Jersey. Here the 
Supply Company really took it easy, as everything was 
handled through the camp organization. Most of us spent 
our time seeing New York and the nearby towns. Christ- 
mas Day was spent here and also New Year's. January 5, 
1919, at 5 :00 p. m., we boarded the train for the longed-for 
point of demobilization, which in our case was Fort Benja- 
min Harrison, Indianapolis, Indiana. From here things 
moved swiftly. Papers were started at once for every man's 
discharge. Plenty was don^ by the home folks for our en- 



SlTPPILy company; 269 

tertainment. Friday, January 10, we paraded through the 
downtown district and following this we were entertained 
at the Murat Theater by the players at that, time playing in 
Indianapolis. ; "'4'^\^^; ^ .4 ,^.r 

ROSTER OF SUPP^LY COMPACT, 4THINI>IA3VJiL INFANTRY 

Captain Harvey B.' Stout, Jr^ commissioned, June 9, 1917; residence, 
Indianapolis, Ind.; assigned as Gapt. Sup Go. 13,9 P. A. Oct. 1, 
1917. ' . 

2d Lieut, Raymond Allen, commissioned Aug. 1^ 1917; residence, Indi- 
anapolis,' Ind.; assigned as 2d Lieut. Sup. Co. .139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Rej?. Sup. Serprt. (ireK)rge A, Bowen, enlisted June 8, 1917; residence, 
Indianapolis, Ind.; trans, as Reg. Sup. Sergt. to Sup. Go. 139 F. A. 
Oct. 1, 1917. 

Reg. Sup. Sergt. Cyril 0. Gooding, enlisted June 8, 1917; residence. 
Indianapolis, Ind.; trans, as Reg. Sup. Sergt. to Sup. Go. 139 F. A. 
Oct. 1, 1917. 

R«g. Sup. Sergt. Percy L. Nicholson, enlisted July 5. 1917; residence, 
Indianapolis, Ind.; trans, as Reg. Sup. Sergt. to Sup. Go. 139 F. A. 
Oct. 1, 1917. 

1st Sergt. Leo S. Flanedy, enlisted June 9, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; trans, as 1st Sergt. to Sup. Go. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Mess Sergt. Austin Clifford, enlisted June, 1917; residence Indianapo- 
lis, Ind.; discharged Aug., 1917. 

Stable Sergt. Clarence C. Arnold, enlisted June 8, 1917; residence. 
Indianapolis, Ind.; trans, as Stable Sergt. to Sup. Go. 139 F. A. 
Oct. 1, 1917. 

Corporal Harrj' L. Long, enlisted June 8, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; trans, as Gorp. to Sup. Go. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Horseshoer John E. Richards, enlisted July 25, 1917; residence. Bear 
Branch, Ind.; trans, as Horseshoer to Sup. Go. 139 F. A. Oct. 1. 
1917. 

Saddler Earl D. Haley, enlisted June 9, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.: trans, as Saddler to Sup. Go. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Cook Reid B. Sprague, enlisted June 9, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; trans, as Gook to Sup. Go. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. Theodore F. Bell, enlisted July 27, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; trans, as Wag. to Sup. Go. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. Edward Y. Boteler, enlisted July 13, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; trans, as Wag. to Sup. Go. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. Yictor G. Coats, enlisted July 9, 1917; residence, Patricksburg, 
Ind.; trans, as Wag. to Sup. Go. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. Clarence D. Crabbs, enlisted July 17, 1917; residence. Indi- 
anapolis, Ind .;trans. as Wag. to Sup. Go. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. Cyrus H. Fuller, enlisted July 3, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; trans, as Wag. to Sup. Go. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. Harry R. Goodwin, enlisted July 21, 1917; residence, Indianapo- 
lis. Ind.; trans, as Wag. to Sup. Go. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. Edward W. Hayes, enlisted June 8, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; trans, as Sergt. to Hq. Det. 76 Inf. Bgde. Aug. 17. 1917. 

Wag. Charles W. Kuebler, enlisted June 23, 1917; residence, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind.; trans, as Wag. to Sup. Go. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. Fred LeFeber, enlisted July 5, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; discharged Aug. 18, 1917. 



270 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Wag. Alvln E. Leyy, enlisted July, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, Ind.; 
trans, as Wag to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. Harry J. Meyers, enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; trans, as Wag. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. Merlin D, Mullane, enlisted July, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind. ; trans, as Pvt. to Hq. Co. 4 Ind. Inf. Sept. 5, 1917. 

Wag.William H. Patterson, enlisted July 5, 1917 ; residence, Indianapo- 
lis, Ind.; trans, as Was:, to Sup. Co. 139 F, A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. Clifton W. Schmalz, enlisted July 2, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; trans, as Wag. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. John W. Schmalz, enlisted June 9, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; trans, as Wag. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. Fred L Shumaker, enlisted July 5, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; trans, as Wag. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. John F. Snyder, enlisted July 2, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 
trans, as Wag. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag Roy F. Stiegelmeyer, enlisted July 5, 1917; residence, Indianapo- 
lis, Ind.; trans, as Wag. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. Herman A. Stuckey, enlisted July 2, 1917; residence, Columbus, 
Ind.; trans, as Wag. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. Clande L. Sumner, enlisted July, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Hq. Co. 4 Ind. Inf. Sept. 5, 1917. 

Wag. William J. Thiele, enlisted July 18, 1917; residence, Indianapo- 
lis, Ind.; trans, as Wag. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. Elmer A. Turner, enlisted July 21, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; trans, as Wag. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. Chester G. Vestal, enlisted June 12, 1917; residence, Indianapo- 
lis, Ind,; trans, as Wag. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. Elvin C. Vliet, enlisted July 19. 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; trans, as Wag. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. Herbert E. Wedewen, enlisted July 16, 1917; residence, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind.; trans, as Wag. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. Walter C. Wulff, enlisted June 8, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; trans, as Wag. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. Clifford R. Zoeller, enlisted July 5, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; trans, as Wag. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Mess Sergt. Allen H. Dickinson, enlisted June 8, 1917; residence, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind.; trans, from Co. L, 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 4 Ind. Inf. 
Aug. 18, 1917, to fill vacancy Austin Clifford discharged; trans, as 
Mess Sergt. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. Karl L, Stimpson, enlisted Aug. 31, 1917; residence, Indianapo- 
lis, Ind.; assigned to Sup. Co. 4 Ind. Inf. Aug. 31, 1917. to fill 
vacancy Edward W. Hayes trans.; trans, as Wag. to Sup. Co. 139 
F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. Fred R, Burckes, enlisted Sept. 19, 1917; residence, Indianapolis. 
Ind.; assigned to Sup. Co. 4 Ind. Inf. Sept. 19, 1917, to fill vacancy 
Fred LeFeber discharged; trans, as Wag. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 
Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. Charles E. Shea, enlisted Sept. 19, 1917; residence, Indianapolis. 
Ind.; assigned to Sup. Co. 4 Ind Inf. Sept. 19, 1917, to fill vacancy 
Merlin D. Mullane trans.; trans, as Wag. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 
Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. Walter R. Lowe, enlisted Sept., 1917; residence, Indianapolis. 
Ind.; assigned to Sup. Co. 4 Ind. Inf. Sept., 1917. to fill vacancy 
Claude L. Sumner trans.; discharged Sept. 29, 1917. 

Wag. Walter J. Rice, enlisted June 13, 1917; residence, Indianapolis. 
Ind.; trans, from Hq. Co. 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 4 Ind. Inf. Sept.. 
1917, to fill vacancy Walter B. Lowe discharged; trans, as Wag. 
to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 



SUPPLY COMPANY 271 



ROSTER OF SUPPLY COMPAITY, 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Captain Harvey B. Stout, Jr^ commissioned June 9, 1917; residence 

Indianapolis, Ind.; dropped from the rolls Oct. 20, 1918, to attend 

the Army General Staff College in France. 
1st Lient. Henry N. OdeU, commissioned July 17, 1917; residence, 

Evansville, Ind.; assigned to Co. May 1, 1918. 
Ist Lient. Ora B. Keller, commissioned June 3, 1917; residence, 

Indianapolis, Ind.; assigned to Co. June 3, 1918. 
2d Lient. Raymond B. Allen, commissioned Aug. 1, 1917; residence, 

Indianapolis, Ind.; promoted to Capt. and trans, to 113 Sup. Train 

May 23, 1918. 
2d Lieut, William A. Kreber, commissioned Aug. 3. 1917; residence, 

Indianapolis, Ind.; trans, as 2d. Lieut, to Hq. Co. Nov. 5, 1917. 
2d Lieut. James E. Brady, commissioned July 21, 1918; residence, 

Atlanta, Ga. ; assigned to Co. Nov. 4, 1918. 
2d Lieut« John N. Wallace, commissioned Nov. 1, 1918; residence, 

So. Boston, Mass.; assigned to Co. Nov. 4, 1918. 
Iteg. Sup. Ser^. George A. Bowen, enlisted June 8, 1917; residence, 

Indianapolis, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Enl. Ord. Cor. Nov. 22, 1917. 
Beg. Sup. SergL Cyril 0. Gooding, enlisted June 8, 1917; residence, 

Indianapolis, Ind.; trans, as Reg. Sup. Sergt. to P. A. 38 Div. N. G. 

May 2, 1918; assigned as 2d. Lieut. Sup. Co. 139 F. A. June 15, 

1918. 
Reg. Sup. Sergt. Peircy L. Jficholson, enlisted July 5, 1917; residence, 

Indianapolis, Ind.; promoted 2d Lieut. Q. M. C. Dec. 5, 1918; 

declined to accept commission. 
Ist Sergt. Leo S. Flanedy, enlisted June 9, 1917; residence, Indianapo- 
lis, Ind.; discharged for acceptance of commission Jan. 15, 1918; 

assigned as 2d Lieut, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Jan. 16, 1918; trans. 

as 2d Lieut, to Hq. Co. June 17, 1918. 
Mess Sergt. Allen H. Dickinson, enlisted June 8, 1917; residence, 

Indianapolis, Ind.; promoted to Reg. Sup. Sergt. Nov. 28, 1917. 
Stable Sergt. Clarence C. Arnold, enlisted June 8, 1917; residence, 

Indianapolis, Ind.; trans, as Sergt. to Personnel Det. 139 F. A. 

May 21, 1918. 
Corp. Harry L. Long, enlisted June 8, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans, as Chf. Mec. to Inf. Replacement Troops N. A. June 

6, 1918. 
Horseshoer John E. Richards, enlisted July 5, 1917; residence Bear 

Branch, Ind.; appointed Wag. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Saddler Earl D. Haley, enlisted June 9, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans, as Saddler to Enl. Ord. Cor. N. A. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Cook Reid B. Sprague, enlisted June 9, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans, as Mess Sergt. to Inf. Replacement Troops, N. A. 

June 6, 1918. 
Wag. Theodore F. Bell, enlisted July 27, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans, as Sergt. to Enl. Ord. Cor. N. A. Nov. 1, 1917. 
W^ag. Edward Y. Boteler, enlisted July 13, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to 432 Eng. Depot Nov. 14, 1917. 
Wag. Victor G. Coats, enlisted July 9, 1917; residence, Patricksburg, 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Enl. Ord. Cor. N. A. Nov. 22, 1917. 
Wag. Clarence D. Crabbs, enlisted July 17, 1917; residence, Indianapo- 
lis, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Enl. Ord. Cor, N. A. Nov. 22, 1917. 
Wag Cyrus H. Fuller, enlisted July 3, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; promoted to Corp. Oct. 3, 1917, and Mess Sergt. June 10, 1918. 
Wag. Harry R. Goodwin, enlisted July 21, 1917 ; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; Pvt. 1 cl. Oct. 1, 1917. 



272 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Wag. Charles MV, Kuebler, enlisted July 23, 1917; residence, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind. ; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Development Battalion Sept. 

I, 1918. 

Wag, Alvln E. Levy, enlisted July, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, Ind.; 
trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Ord. Det. N. A. R. I. Arsenal Oct. 24, 1917. 

Wag. Harry J, Meyers, enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; Pvt. 1 cl. Jan. 22, 1918. 

Wag. William H. Patterson, enlisted July 5, 1917; residence, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind.; Pvt. 1 cl. July 1, 1917. 

Wag. Clifton W. Schmalz, enlisted July 2, 1917; residence, Indianapo- 
lis, Ind.; promoted to Mec. Oct. 1, 1917; Sergt. Nov. 23, 1917 and 
1st Sergt. June 8, 1918. 

Wag. John W. Schmalz, enlisted June 9, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind. ; promoted Corp. Oct. 3, 1917 and Reg. Sup. Sergt. Mar. 3, 1918. 

Wag. Fred L Shumaker, enlisted July 5, 1917' residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Enl. Ord. Cor. N. A. Nov. 1, 1917. 

Wag. John F. Snyder, enlisted July 2, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 
trans, as Pvt. to Enl. Ord. Cor. N. A. 22, 1917. 

Wag. Roy F, Stiegelmeyer, enlisted July 5, 1917; residence, Indianapo- 
lis, Ind.; promoted to Sergt. July 1, 1918. 

Wag. Herman A. Stuckey, enlisted July 2, 1917; residence, Columbus, 
Ind.; trans, as Mec. to Enl. Ord. Cor. N. A. Jan. 1, 1918. 

Wag. William J. Thiele, enlisted July 18, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Enl. Ord. Cor. N. A. Apr. 10, 1918. 

Wag. Elmer A. Turner, enlisted July 21, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; Pvt. 1 cl. Oct. 1, 1917. 

Wag. Chester 0. Vestal, enlisted June 12, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; trans, as 1st Sergt. to Inf. Replacement Troops N. A. June 
6, 1918. 

Wag. Elvin C. Vliet, enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; promoted to Chf. Mec. July 1, 1918. 

Wag. Herbert E. Wedewen, enlisted July 16, 1917; residence, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind.; promoted to Corp. July 25, 1918. 

Wag. Walter C. Wulff, enlisted July 8, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; promoted to Corp. June 8, 1918. 

Wag. Clifford R. Zoeller, enlisted July 5, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Enl. Ord. Cor. N. A. Nov. 22, 1917. 

Wag. Karl L. Stimpson, enlisted Aug. 31, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; trans, as Corp. to Casual Co. July 4, 1918. 

Wag. Fred R, Burckes, enlisted Sept. 19, 1917; residence. Indianapo- 
lis, Ind.; trans, as Mec. to Hq. l)etach. 63d F. A. Brigade, Jan. 

II, 1918. 

Wag. Chas. E. Shea, enlisted Sept. 19, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Hq. Detach. 63d Artillery Brigade, Oct. 

25, 1917. 

Wag. W^alter J. Rice, enlisted June 13, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Q. M. C, Jan. 23, 1918. 

Trivates 
Banks, James W., enlisted Aug. 22, 1917; residence, Mayfield, Ky.; 

trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 P. A. Oct. 1, 1917; trans. 

as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment. 
Hogan, Tliomas J., enlisted May 3, 1917; residence, Indianapolis. 

Ind.; trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; 

trans, as Pvt. to U. S. Discipline Barracks, Ft. Leavenworth, 

Kans. April 26, 1918. 
McCoy, Sam, enlisted Aug. 10, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 



SUPPLY COMPANY 273 

Priyates 

O'Roarke, Fred, enlisted May 3, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, Ind.; 

trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; trans. 

as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Beal, Preston, enlisted July 3, 1917; residence, Poseyville, Ind.; 

trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1. 1917; trans.. 

as Q. M. Sergt. 1 cl. to School for Bakers and Cooks Q. M. C. N. A. 

June 4, 1918. 
Adams, Herbert C^ enlisted June 19, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Det. June 4, 1918. 
Alfred, Garrett, trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 

1917; discharged Nov. 30, 1917. 
Baker, Andrew J^ enlisted May 23. 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Baker, Charlie, enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; trans. 

as Pvt. to Replacement Detachmerft June 4, 1918. 
Baker, Robert, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; trans. 

as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Brinson, Bonnie B^ enlisted Aug. 17, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; 

trans, as Pvt. to U. S. Guards N. A. Fort Niagara, N. Y., June 

11, 1918. 
Carroll, Francis W^ enlisted Aug. 29, 1917; residence, Noblesville. 

Ind.; trans, from Co. C. 4 Ind. Lnf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; promoted 

to Wag. Dec. 20, 1917. 
Cherry, Geori^e H., enlisted Sept. 20, 1917: residence, Huntington, 

Ind.; trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; dis- 
charged Nov. 13, 1917. 
Chesterman, Burton L., enlisted May 1, 1917; residence, Hunting- 
ton, Ind.; trans, from Co. C. 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 

Oct. 1. 1917; trans, as Pvt. to Development Battalion June 22, 1918. 
Took, Floyd, enlisted April 27. 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind.; 

trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; trans. 

as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Couch, Archie L^ enlisted Aug. 29, 1917; residence, Huntington, 

Ind.; trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Cox, Walter L^ enlisted July 30, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; trans. 

as Pvt. 1 cl. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Davis, Kenneth E„ enlisted Aug. 2, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; trans. 

as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Fulton, George H., enlisted May 1, 1917; residence, Huntington, 

Ind.; trans, from Co. C. 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 

1917; trans, as Pvt. to Enl. Ord. Cor. N. A. Nov. 22, 1917. 
Harris, Thurman C^ enlisted May 4, 1917; residence, Boonville, 

Ind.; trans, from Co. G, 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 

1, 1917: trans, as Pvt. to Development Battalion June 22, 1918. 
Hawn, Charles F,, enlisted Aug. 29, 1917; residence, Huntington, 

Ind.; trans, from Co. C, 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 

1917; trans, as Cook to Transport 242 Hospital Oct. 16, 1918. 



274 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 



Privates 
Hicks, Alvin A^ enlisted Aug. 10, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; trans. 

from Co. E, 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; pro- 
moted to Wag. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Huffman, Roy L., enlisted Aug. 13, 1917; residence, Huntington, 

Ind.; trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1. 1917; 

discharged Jan. 19, 1918. 
Hulllnger, Balph, enlisted June 4, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Leitch, John T^ enlisted July 31, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. E. 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; 

promoted to Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Lindzy, Arthur ۥ, enlisted July 25, 1917; residence, North Man- 
chester, Ind.; trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 

1917; trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Magnus, Balph N., enlisted April 23, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Manahan, Roy L^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; trans. 

as Pvt. to 113 Military Police Feb. 9, 1918. 
Marshall, Ira L^ enlisted July 18, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind.; 

trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; trans. 

as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Miles, Garvie C^ enlisted Aug. 23, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, Ind.; 

trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; trans. 

as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Miller, Ira J^ enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Uniondale, Ind.; 

trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; dis- 
charged Dec. 17, 1917. 
Moore, Edward P^ enlisted Aug. 23, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; 

discharged Nov. 5, 1917. 
Moore, Thomas J^ enlisted May 15, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Query, Bumard L^ enlisted May 31, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; dis- 
charged Jan. 30, 1918. 
Randall, Harold M^ enlisted May 1, 1917; residence, Huntington. 

Ind.; trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; 

discharged April 4, 1918. 
Saltsman, William M., enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Tennyson. 

Ind.; trans, from Co. G, 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 

1917; trans, as Pvt. to Development Battalion June 22, 1918. 
Sattinger, Mike, enlisted June 12, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. D, 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Sears, Robert F^ enlisted Aug. 13, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; trans. 

as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Sims, Charles L^ enlisted July 27, 1917; residence, Gas City, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. E, 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; 

promoted to Wag. June 7, 1918. 
Smith, Fred, enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. G, 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1,1917; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 



SUPPLY COMPANY 275 



Privates 

Spillman, Sam, enlisted May 2, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. D. 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Stalter, Clarence A^ enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. A, 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Todd, Clifford E^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans, from Co. D. 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 

1917; trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Wagner, Columbus F^ enlisted Sept. 20, 1917; residence, Batesvile, 

Ind.; trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Weddle, George, trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 

1, 1917; discharged Oct. 6, 1917. 
Wickllff, Marvil M^ enlisted April 28, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans, from Co. D, 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 

1917; trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Yeager, Oscar J^ enlisted Aug. 10, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind; 

trans, from Co. E, 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1. 1917; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Young, Frank, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind.; 

trans, from 4 Ind. Inf. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; trans. 

as Pvt. to Enl. Ord. Cor. N. A. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Bauermeister, Adolph H^ enlisted Sept. 20, 1917; residence, Ossian, 

Ind.; trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917; to Sup. Co. 139 

F. A.; trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Bonewitz, Glenn, enlisted Sept. 20, 1917; residence, Huntington, 

Ind.; trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917 to Sup. Co. 139 

F. A.; trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Cotton, Emery L^ enlisted Sept. 20, 1917; residence, Bluffton, Ind.; 

trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Day, Frererick D^ enlisted Sept. 20, 1917; residence, Bluffton, Ind.; 

trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Hall, Dale J^ enlisted Oct. 5, 1917; residence, Laketon, Ind.; trans. 

from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20. 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; pro- 
moted to Cook Dec. 20, 1917. 
Heche, Harry, enlisted Oct. 4, 1917; residence, Bluffton, Ind.; trans. 

from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; trans. 

as Pvt. to Enl. Ord. Cor. N. A. Nov. 22, 1917. 
Hettmansperger, Carl H., enlisted Oct. 5, 1917; residence, Spiker- 

ville, Ind.; trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 

139 F. A.; trans, as Pvt. to Enl. Ord. Cor. N. A. Nov. 22, 1917. 
Huffman, James H., enlisted Sept. 20, 1917; residence, Poneto, Ind.; 

trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; 

promoted to Wag. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Hunter, James Y^ enlisted Oct. 3, 1917; residence, Washington, 

Ind.; trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 

F. A.; promoted to Wag. Dec. 20, 1917. 
Jack, Joe R,, enlisted Oct. 5, 1917; residence, Wabash, Ind.; trans. 

from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20. 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; pro- 
moted to Wag. May 10, 1918, and Cook Nov. 1, 1918. 
Kempf, Harry W., enlisted Sept. 21, 1917; residence, Amboy, Ind.; 

trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; 

promoted to Wag. Dec. 20, 1917, and Corp. Feb. 8, 1918. 



276 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Privates 

Kilander, Guy A., enlisted Sept. 20, 1917; residence, Montpelier 

Ind.; trans, from Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 

promoted to Wag. Dec. 20, 1917, and Corp. May 10, 1918. 
King, Cliancy, enlisted Sept. 20, 1917; residence, Petroleum, Ind. 

trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 

promoted to Wag. Sept. 1, 1918. 
King, Lester, enlisted Sept. 20, 1917; residence. Petroleum, Ind. 

trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 

promoted to Wag. Dec. 20, 1917. 
Lehman, Paul V^ enlisted Sept. 21, 1917; residence, Wabash, Ind. 

trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 

promoted to Pvt. 1 cl. June 7, 1918, and Wag. July 1, 1918. 
Lockwood, Hiram, enlisted Oct. 4, 1917; residence, Bluffton, Ind. 

trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 

promoted to Cook May 21, 1918. 
Luttrell, Urbon, enlisted Sept. 21, 1917; residence, Wabash, Ind. 

trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 

trans, as Wag. to 'Enl. Ord. Cor. N. A. Jan. 1, 1918. 
Lynn, David B., Jr^ enlisted Oct. 5, 1917; residence, Wabash, Ind. 

trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 

promoted to Cook July 1, 1918. 
McDonald, John B^ enlisted Sept. 21, 1917 ; residence, Wabash, Ind. 

trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 

promoted to Pvt. 1 cl. Feb. 12, 1918. 
. McGath, Charles E^ enlisted Sept. 21, 1917; residence, Wabash, Ind. 

trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 

promoted to Wag. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Mason, James, enlisted Sept. 20, 1917; residence, Bluffton, Ind. 

trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 

trans, as Pvt. to U. S. Guards N. A. Fort Niagara, N. Y. June 

11, 1918. 
Meyer, Harold, enlisted Oct. 5, 1917; residence, Roann, Ind.; trans. 

from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; trans. 

as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Meyer, William F^ enlisted Sept. 20, 1917; residence, Ossian, Ind.; 

trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; 

promoted to Wag. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Miller, John H^ enlisted Oct. 5, 1917; residence, Wabash, Ind.; 

trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Enl. Ord. Cor. N. A. Nov. 22, 1917. 
Moore, Boss, enlisted Oct. 5, 1917; residence, Wabash, Ind.; trans. 

from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; trans. 

as Pvt. to Enl. Ord. Cor. N. A. Nov. 22. 1917. 
Neace, John S., enlisted Oct. 4, 1917; residence, Wewanta, W. Va.; 

trans, from Camp Lee Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 

F. A.; promoted to Wag. April 1, 1918. 
Ogden, Walter, enlisted Sept. 21, 1917; residence, Laketon, Ind.; 

trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 
Ohm, Jesse D^ enlisted Oct. 5, 1917; residence. North Manchester, 

Ind.; trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 

F. A.; trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Ohmart, Verl H^ enlisted Sept. 21, 1917; residence, North Man- 
chester, Ind.; trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. 

Co. 139 F. A.; discharged March 23, 1918. 
Pence, Urban M^ enlisted Oct. 4, 1517; residence, Bluffton, Ind.; 

trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Enl. Ord. Cor. N. A. Nov. 22, 1917. 



SUPPLY COMPANY 277 



Privates 

Pennington, 'William E^ enlisted Oct. 4, 1917; residence, Bluffton, 

Ind.; trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 

F. A.; trans, as Pvt. to Q. M. C. N. A. Dec. 3, 1917. 
Phillips, Harlev 0^ enlisted Sept. 21, 1917; residence, Wabash, Ind.; 

trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; 

promoted to Wag. Dec. 20, 1917. 
Rickert, Elmer F., enlisted Sept. 21, 1917; residence, North Man- 
chester, Ind.; trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. 

Co. 139 F. A.; promoted to Wag. Dec. 20, 1917. 
Smith, Clyde D., enlisted Oct. 5, 1917; residence, Huntington, Ind.; 

trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; 

promoted to Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 1, 1918, and Wag. Nov. 1, 1918. 
Sturgeon, Charles R^ enlisted Oct. 4, 1917; residence, Bluffton, Ind.; 

trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Vet. Cor. N. A. Dec. 20, 1917. 
Tinsman, Raymond J^ enlisted Oct. 4, 1917; residence, Ind.; trans. 

from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; trans. 

as Pvt. to U. S. Guards N. A. Fort Niagara, N. Y., June 11, 1918. 
Travis, Harold, enlisted Oct. 4. 1917; residence, Bluffton, Ind.; 

trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Tondersmith, Rav 0^ enlisted Sept. 20, 1917; residence, Bluffton, 

Ind.; trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 

F. A.; trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Walter, Charlie D,, enlisted Sept. 21, 1917; residence, North Man- 
chester, Ind.; trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. 

Co. 139 F. A.; trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 

4, 1918. 
Werling, Walter E., enlisted Sept. 20, 1917; residence, Ossian, Ind.; 

trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Q. M. C. N. A. Dec. 3. 1917. 
Yentes, Walter T., enlisted Sept. 21, 1917; residence, Wabash, Ind.; 

trans, from 159 Depot Brig. Oct. 20, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; 

promoted to Wag. Sept. 1, 1918, 
Oibson, Henry J,, enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, from Bat. D, 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 
Burton, Harrv A,, enlisted May 1, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans.* from Bat. B. 139 F. A. Nov.. 1917. to Sup. Co. 139 

F. A.; trans, as Pvt. to 432 Eng. Depot Feb. 2, 1918. 
Pvt 1 cl. Mitchell, Robert Q., enlisted July 9. 1917; residence, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind.; trans, from Hq. Co. 139 F. A. Jan., 1918, to Sup. 

Co. 139 F. A.; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Replacement, Detachment 

June 4, 1918. 
Schissel, Otto, enlisted Aug 14,. 1917; residence, Indianapolis, Ind; 

trans, from Hq. Co. 139 F. A. Jan. 11, 1918, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Patrick, Walter E., enlisted July 12, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans, from Hq. Co. 139 F. A. April 15. 1918. to Sup. Co. 

139 F. A.; promoted to Wag. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Cook Erville Ludwig, enlisted April 28, 1917; residence, Muncie, 

Ind.; trans, from Co. G, 152 Inf. May 23, 1918, to Sup. Co. 139 

F. A.; appointed Wag. Nov. 1, 1918. 
Privates 

Bailey, Elmer K., enlisted July 1, 1916; residence, Valparaiso, Ind : 

trans, from Bat. E, 139 F. A. May 14, 1918, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; 

promoted to Cook Nov. 1, 1918. 



278 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Priyates 

Tatum, Claude, B^ enlisted June 8, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans, from Bat. F, 139 F. A. June 24, 1918, to Sup. Co. 

139 F. A.; promoted to Sergt. July 1, 1918. 
Watson, Robert W^ enlisted June 6, 1918; residence, Johnson City, 

111.; assigned to Co. June 11, 1918; promoted to Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 

1, 1918. 
Rogers, William A^ enlisted July 7, 1918; residence, Pisgah, Ala.; 

assigned to Co. July 27, 1918. 
Waller, Marlon, enlisted July 6, 1918; residence, St. Charles, Ark.; 

assigned to Co. July 27, 1918. 
Boggs, Ernest, enlisted July 17, 1918; residence, Summitt, Miss.; 

assigned to Co. Aug. 4, 1918. 
Burch, Henry C, enlisted July 14, 1918; residence, Edenburg, Miss.; 

assigned to Co. Aug. 4, 1918; trans, as Pvt. to Development Bat- 
talion Aug. 29, 1918. 
Davis, George M^ enlisted July 15, 1918; residence. Mulberry, Fla.; 

assigned to Co. Aug. 4, 1918. 
Drinkwater, William W^ enlisted July 16, 1918; residence, Meridian, 

Miss.; assigned to Co. Aug. 4, 1918. 
Evans, Thomas M., enlisted July 16, 1918; residence, Harriman, 

Tenn; assigned to Co. Aug. 4, 1918; promoted to Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 

20, 1918. 
Hamilton, James M., enlisted July 19, 1918; residence, Batesville. 

Miss.; assigned to Co. Aug. 4, 1918; promoted to Wag. Nov. 1, 1918. 
Henderson, Horace J^ enlisted July 16, 1918; residence, Laurel Hill, 

Fla.; assigned to Co. Aug. 4, 1918; trans, as Pvt. to Transport 

242 Hospital Oct. 13, 1918; deceased Oct. 17, 1918. 
Lemer, Herbert Z^ enlisted July 16, 1918; residence, Meridian, Miss.; 

assigned to Co. Aug. 4, 1918; promoted to Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1918. 
Strond, Louis A^ enlisted July 15, 1918; residence, Natchez, Miss.; 

assigned to Co. Aug. 4, 1918; promoted to Wag. Nov. 1, 1918. 
Styles, Charles, enlisted July 16, 1918; residence, Ducktown, Tenn..; 

assigned to Co. Aug. 4, 1918. 
Sweat, Jesse M., enlisted July 15, 1918; residence, St. Petersburg, 

Fla.; assigned to Co. Aug. 4, 1918; trans, to Development Battalion 

Sept. 9, 1918. 
Vandevolde, Louis, enlisted July 15, 1918; residence, Lake Port, 

Fla.; assigned to Co. Aug. 4, 1918; trans, as Pvt. to Transport 

242 Hospital Oct. 9, 1918; died Oct. 17, 1918. 
Adcock, Mike C^ enlisted July 22, 1918; residence, Green Bier. 

Tenn.; assigned to Co. Aug. 7, 1918; trans, as Pvt. to Development 

Battalion Aug. 29, 1918. 
Bauer, August, enlisted July 26, 1918; residence, Gillett, Ark.; 

assigned to Co. Aug. 7, 1918. 
Bettes, Fred R^ enlisted July 29, 1918; residence, Jacksonville, 

Fla.; assigned to Co. Aug. 7, 1918. 
Dawson, Lennie, enlisted July 29, 1918; residence, Newberry, Fla.; 

assigned to Co. Aug. 7, 1918. 
Eckroad, Orin W., enlisted July 30, 1918; residence. West Point. 

Miss.; assigned to Co. Aug. 7, 1918. 
Fryant, Ralph W^ enlisted July 22, 1918; residence, Jackson, Miss.: 

assigned to Co. Aug:. 7, 1918; trans, as Pvt. to Transport 242 

Hospital Oct. 14, 1918; deceased Oct. 16, 1918. 
Halwes, Ferdinand C^ enlisted July 26, 1918; residence, Dewitt, Ark.; 

assigned to Co. Aug. 7, 1918. 
Holzhauer, Herman, enlisted July 26, 1918; residence, Gillett, Ark.: 

assigned to Co. Aug. 7, 1918. 



SUPPLY COMPANY 279 



Ker&ten, Frank, enlisted July 26, 1918; residence, Gillett, Ark.; 
assigned to Co. Aug. 7, 1918. 

Mastiii, Steve, enlisted July 21, 1918; residence, Oceola, Ark.; 
assigned to Co. Aug. 7, 1918; promoted to Wag. Nov. 1, 1918. 

McArthur, Dewey, enlisted July 22, 1918; residence, Steele, Mo.; 
assigned to Co. Aug. 7, 1918. 

McKewey, Albert K^ enlisted July 26, 1918; residence, Dewitt, Ark.; 
assigned to Co. Aug. 7, 1918; trans, as Pvt. to Overseas Casuals, 
Camp Merritt, N. J., Sept. 28, 1918. 

O'Neal, Thomas B^ enlisted July 22, 1918; residence, Fort Smith, 
Ark.; assigned to Co. Aug. 7, 1918; promoted to Wag. Nov. 1, 1918. 

Porter, Ben K,, enlisted July 28, 1918; residence, Fayetteville, Ark.; 
assigned to Co. Aug. 7, 1918. 

Reichenbach, Charles W^ enlisted July 26, 1918; residence, Stuttgart, 
Ark.; assigned to Co. Aug. 7, 1918; promoted to Wag. Nov. 1, 1918. 

Smith, Kirby, enlisted July 5, 1918; residence, Letonia, Ark.; 
assigned to Co. Aug. 7, 1918. 

Hunter, Fred L., enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Carbondale, 111.; 
trans, from Co. C, Rahes Auto and Tractor School Training Detach- 
ment N. A. Aug. 13, 1918, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 

Lackey, James E^ enlisted June 17, 1918; residence, Pulaskie, 111.; 
trans, from Co. C, Rahes Auto and Tractor School Training Detach- 
ment N. A. Aug. 13, 1918, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; promoted to Mec 
Nov. 1, 1918. 

Parks, Fred H^ enlisted June 13, 1918; residence, Gonconda, 111.; 
trans, from Co. C, Rahes Auto and Tractor School Training 
Detachment N. A. Aug. 13, 1918, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 

Riddile, John V^ enlisted June 13, 1918; residence, Oakmont, Pa.; 
trans, from Co. C, Rahes Auto and Tractor School Training Detach- 
ment N. A. Aug. 13, 1918, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; promoted to Pvt. 
1 cl. Nov. 20, 1918. 

Robinson, Bayid^ enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Springfield, 111.; 
trans, from Co. C, Rahes Auto and Tractor School Training Detach- 
ment N. A. Aug. 13, 1918, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 

.Schmidt, Martin L., enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Collinsville, 
111.; trans, from Co. C, Rahes Auto and Tractor School Training 
Detachment N. A. Aug. 13, 1918, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; promoted 
to Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1918. 

Schultz, Ray, enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Braceville, 111.; 
trans, from Co. C, Rahes Auto and Tractor School Training Detach- 
ment N. A. Aug. 13, 1918, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; promoted to Wag. 
Nov. 1, 1918. 

.Shane, Wayman, enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Woodlawn, 111.; 
trans, from Co. C, Rahes Auto and Tractor School Training Detach- 
ment N. A. Aug. 13, 1918, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 

Thompson, William E^ enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Moline, 
111.; trans, from Co. C, Rahes Auto and Tractor School Training 
Detachment N. A. Aug. 13, 1918, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; promoted 
to Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 20, 1918. 

Wiesbrook, Erwin S., enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Wheaton, 
111.; trans, from Co. C, Rahes Auto and Tractor School Training 
Detachment N. A. Aug. 13, 1918, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A.; promoted 
to Wag. Nov. 1, 1918. 

Klans, Clinton W^ enlisted Dec. 9, 1917; residence, Richmond Hill, 
N. Y.; trans, from 49 Co. 152 Depot Brig. Oct. 4, 1918, to Sup. 
Co.- 139 F. A. 

Peterson, Jack, enlisted April 4, 1918; residence, Plainfield, N. J.; 
trans, from 49 Co. 152 Depot Brig. Oct. 4, 1918, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 



280 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Privates 

Ruedi, Theodoi'e, enlisted April 30, 1918; residence, Bronx, N. Y.; 

trans, from 49 Co. 152 Depot Brig. Oct. 4, 1918, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 
Schnabel, Arthur A^ enlisted Sept. 29, 1917; residence, New York, 

N. Y.; trans, from 49 Co. 152 Depot Brig. Oct. 4, 1918, to Sup. Co. 

139 F. A.; promoted to Wag. Nov. 20, 1918. 
Fletcher, Fern L., enlisted April 26, 1918; residence. New York, 

N. Y.; trans, from Bat. F, 139 F. A. Nov. 4, 1918, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 
Le^vis, James R., enlisted May 31, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans, from Bat. F. 139 F. A. Nov. 4, 1918, to Sup. Co. 139 

F. A.; promoted to Cook Nov. 20, 1918. 



Company A, 4th Indiana Infantry 

This company, the first unit of the regiment to be 
organized, was raised chiefly through the efforts of Cap- 
tain Charlie R. Dunn, a veteran of the Spanish War. 

The organization of the company was commenced in 
March, 1917, and on April 27th the company was for- 
mally mustered into the Indiana National Guard, and 
later assigned to the 4th Indiana Infantry and designated 
as Company A. 

Drills were held and instruction in the foot movements 
was given several nights each week. Captain Frank E. 
Livengood, Infantry, Instructor Indiana National Guard, 
came to Decatur twice each week, during the spring 
and summer and directed the instruction. 

In response to the President's call, the company 
assembled at the Fair Grounds, Decatur, on August 5th 
and formally came into Federal service. On September 
5th the company joined the regiment at Fort Benjamin 
Harrison, Indiana. George J. Rollinson, formerly an 
infantry sergeant instructor of the regular army, was 
assigned to the company as Second Lieutenant. 

Upon arriving at Fort Harrison the company was 
assigned to the 1st Battalion and under Major Driesback, 
the battalion commander, real work began. Thereafter 
the story of Company A is the same as the regiment. 
On arrival at Camp Shelby, the regiment became Heavy 
Field Artillery and this company and Company B, of 
Rushville, were consolidated and became Battery A, 139th 
Field Artillery. Captain Dunn remained in command of 
the battery. Later he was transferred and assigned 
to the 113th Ammunition Train. Captain Arthur Donan 
was transferred to the 139th Field Artillery and assigned 

19 



282 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

to Battery A. Captain Donan took the battery overseas, 
but unfortunately took the influenza, developed a severe 
pneumonia and was sick for a long time in the British 
Hospital near Cherbourg, France. Captain Donan did 
not rejoin the regiment. Captain Mark A. Dawson, Field 
Artillery, formerly of the 42d Division, joined the regiment 
at Camp de Meucon and was assigned to the command 
of Battery A. 

ROSTER OF COMPAJfY A, 4TH INDIANA INFANTRY 

Capt Charlie R, Dunn; residence, Decatur, Ind.; assigned as Capt. 

Bat. A, 139 F. A. Oct.l, 1917. 
1st Lieut. Robert H. Peterson; residence, Decatur, Ind.; assigned as 

Is Lieut. Bat. A, 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
2d Lieut George J. RoUinson; residence, Vicksburg, Miss.; assigned 

as 2d Lieut. Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Sergt. Lloyd D. Beery; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, as Sergt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Sergt Dallas Brown; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, as Sergt. to Bat 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Sergt James B. Brill; residence, Indianapolis, Ind.; trans, as Sergt. 

to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Sergt Jesse L. Cole; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, as Sergt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct 1, 1917. 
Sergt Fred M. Elzey; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, as Sergt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct 1, 1917. 
Sergt Robert A, Merryman; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, as Sergt. 

to Bat A 139 F. A. Oct 1, 1917. 
Sergt Marion L. Watkins; residence, Monroe, Ind.; trans, as Sergt. 

to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct 1, 1917. 
Corp. Paul H. Cook; residence, Poneto, Ind.; trans, as Corp. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct 1, 1918. 
Corp. Russel Dull; residence, Wilshire, Ohio; trans, as Corp to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct 1, 1917. 
Corp Fred Gay; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, as Corp. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct 1. 1917. 
Corp. Bernard Keller; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, as Corp. to 

Bat A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Corp. Joseph Laurent; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, as Corp to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1918. 
Corp. Joseph McConnell; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, as Corp to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Corp. Donald S. Patterson; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, as Corp. 

to Bat A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Cook John C. Bair; residence, Geneva, Ind.; trans, as Cook to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct 1, 1917. 
Cook Heber Fonner; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, as Cook to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct 1, 1917. 
Bugler Herman Haag; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, as Bugler 

to Bat A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 



BATTERY A 283 

Privates 
Andrews, Hosea; residence, Portland, Ind. ; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Bogner, Leo; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. 1 el. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Bacon, Cass; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Bacon, Carroll; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Bacon, Frank; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 F. A. 

Oct. 1, 1918. 
Butler, Ir\in; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Brenneman, Jefferson; residence, Bluffton, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Borne, Gust M.; residence, Magley, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Bovine, Edward A.; residence, Monroe, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Burrell, Racy; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 F. A. 

Oct. 1, 1917. 
Bryan, Chester; residence, Monroe, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 F. A. 

Oct. 1, 1917. 
Beery, Albert; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 F. A. 

Oct. 1, 1917; discharged. 
Cross, Virgil A.; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 F. A. 

Oct. 1, 1917; trans. June Replacement Draft. 
Crozier, Earl J.; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 F. A. 

Oct. 1, 1917; trans. June Replacement Draft. 
Cable, Leroy; residence, Preble, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 F. A. 

Oct. 1, 1917; trans, to June Replacement Draft. 
Clark, Arlie; residence, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1,1917; 

trans, to June Replacement Draft. 
Cook, Floyd; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 

Oct. 1, 1917. 
Darwecter, Elmer; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 

F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; trans, to June Replacement Draft. 
Dettinger, Ernest; residence, Magley, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 F. A. 

Oct. 1, 1917; trans. June Replacement Draft. 
Ehinger, Leo, enlisted May 9, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans. 

as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; appointed Corp. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Enos, Floyd G^ enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F. A.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Feb. 1, 1918; 

appointed Corp. Aug. 20, 1918. 
Emery, Herman E^ enlisted June 11, 1917; residence, Berne, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. 

June 11, 1918. 
Fryback, Charles S^ enlisted July 25, 1917; residence, Bluffton, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; appointed Corp. 

Oct. 1, 1917; appointed Sergt. July 16, 1918. 
Flanders, Carlisle D., enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Decatur, 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; appointed Corp. 

Oct. 1, 1917; reduced to Pvt. Feb. 20, 1918; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. 

Aug. 1, 1918; appointed Wag. Nov. 21, 1918. 
Foltz, Frank; residence, Willshire, Ohio; trans, to Bat. A 139 F. A. 

Oct. 1, 1917; trans. June Replacement Draft. 
Gass, Leon; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 F. A.; 

trans. June Replacement Draft. 



284 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Pmates 

Ginley, James; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 F. A. 

trans. June Replacement Draft. 
Gallogly, Melvin F.; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 

F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; trans. June Replacement Draft. 
Hower, Burt J., enlisted July 1, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind. ; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; appointed Pvt. 

1 cl. Oct. 1, 1917; appointed Corp. March 15, 1918; appointed 

Sergt. April 27, 1918; appointed Mess Sergt. April 27, 1918. 
Hixon, Howard, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Bluffton, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917; appointed wag. Feb. 

.19, 1918; appointed Corp. Aug. 20. 1918. 
Hooker, Dewey; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 F. A. 

Oct. 1, 1917; trans. June Replacement Draft. 
Hoover, Garth K,; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 

F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Helmrick, John H.; residence, Magley, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 

F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Jaberg, Edward F,, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Magley, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Johnson, Burl; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, to 42 Div. 
Johnson, IViUiam; residence, Magley, Ind.; trans, to 42 Div. 
Kumpf, Sherman, enlisted May 29, 1917; residence, Bluffton, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F. A. 
Kern, Herbert, enlisted June 11, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 P. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Knavel, May M^ enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Kolter, Adolph; residence, Magley, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Komon, Charley; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
LortU Lawrence; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Miller, Otto F., enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1. 1917. 
Miller, Hubert, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Magley, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Malony, Charles, enlisted June 11, 1917; residence, Monroe, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Miller, Homer B^ enlisted June 29, 1917; residence, Bluffton, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1. 1917. 
Morgan, Charles H., enlisted June 20, 1917; residence, Monroe, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Mowery, Howard A,, enlisted June 11, 1917; residence, Bluffton, Ind.; 

tr^ns. as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
May, Lee, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans. 

as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
McCroskey, Merl; residence, Geneva, Ind.; trans, to 42 Div. 
McConnell, Fred; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat, 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Mcintosh, Lohnas; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Monday, Floyd; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Mummaw, Morris; residence, Magley, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Miller, Ira; residence, Bluffton, Ind.; trans, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 

Oct. 1, 1917. 



BATTERY A 285 

Miller, Chalmer I).; residence, Monroeville, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
3runtz, John; residence, Monroeville, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 

F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
>»e\ill, Onier F.; residence, Geneva, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 F. A. 

Oct. 1, 1917. 
Xickolas, Mike; residence, Bluffton, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 F. A. 

Oct. 1, 1917. 
Owens, Arbie E.; residence, Magley, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 

F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Porter, Chalmer 0.; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, to Band, 

4 Ind. Inf. 
Passnaters, Clarence; residence, Ind.; trans, to 42 Div. 
Parrish, Homer, enlisted May 29, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Parr, Harry, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Decatur. Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Robinson, Lester; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, to 42 Div. 
Rademaclier, Edward; residence, Fort Wayne, Ind.; discharged. 
Smith, Harry B^ enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Bluffton, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Staley, James K^ enlisted June 29, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Shoemaker, Lynn, enlisted May 29, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Smelser, (riles 0^ enlisted June 29, 1917; residence, Portland, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Sheets, Fred; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, to 42 Div. 
Schultz, George F.-; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, to 42 Div. 
Steed, Harry; residence, Geneva, Ind.; trans, to 42 Div. 
Stevens, Clarence; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 

F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Schackley, Loyd; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 F. A. 

Oct. 1, 1917. 
Steele, Harye; trans, to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Stalter, Clarence; residence, Magley, Ind.; trans, to Sup. Co. 139 

F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Stont, Roscoe; residence, Bluffton, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 F. A. 

Oct. 1, 1917. 
Uher, Tony; trans, to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Tenis, Glenn, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917, as Pvt. 
Wilson, Otto; residence, Berne, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 F. A. 

Oct. 1, 1917. 
Wise, Charley; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 F. A. 

Oct. 1, 1917. 
Weldy, Vaughn; residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 F. A. 

Oct. 1, 1917. 
Weber, Clarence, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Ward, James H., enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Wynn, Medford, enlisted May 29, 1917; residence, Bluffton, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Young, Frank; residence, Dixon, Ohio; trans, to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 

Oct. 1, 1917. 
Yahne, Ed^vard F,; residence, Decatur, Ind.; discharged. 



Company B, 4th Indiana Infantry 

Company B was organized at Rushville, Ind., the mem- 
bers being principally from Rush, Fayette and Decatur 
Counties. On April 28th, 1917, it had an enlisted per- 
sonnel of 72 and was on that day mustered into the 
Indiana National Guard. On May 23d, 1917, John H. 
Kiplinger, of Rushville, was commissioned as Captain of 
Infantry and assigned to its command and Allen H. 
Blacklidge was commissioned as First Lieutenant and 
assigned to the company. 

An armory was established in the Court House and 
the drilling of the new organization was immediately 
started. The drills were held at night and for this purpose 
the city especially lighted a part of the Park. An exten- 
sive recruiting campaign was also immediately started 
and on August 5th, 1917, when the company was called 
into service by the President's Proclamation, it mustered 
167 men and 2 officers, the largest company in the 
regiment. 

The company was inspected by Major Heidt, of the 
U. S. Army, on July 13th, 1917, and a few days there- 
after formal notice of its acceptance into the National 
Guard was received. All men except five appeared for 
the inspection and very favorable comment was made 
by the inspecting officer, both as to the size of the 
company and the personnel. 

It being apparent that there would be a shortage of 
uniforms, about the middle of July this question was taken 
up with the company with the result that each man pur- 
chased his own uniform. These arrived a short time after 
the company mobilized. 



288 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Immediately following mobilization at the Court House, 
Rushville, August 5th, 1917, a camp was established 
at the Rush County Fair Grounds and work begun to 
further prepare the company for anticipated early active 
service. The camp was named Camp Edward H. Wolf, 
in honor of the late Colonel Edward H. Wolf, of Rush- 
ville, a widely known, highly honored and esteemed citizen. 

The company had no equipment at the time of mob- 
ilization and each man was instructed to bring a tin 
cup, knife, fork, spoon and pan and also a blanket or 
comfort. Stoves were borrowed as were cooking utensils 
and the first meal was served promptly at 1 :00 o'clock on 
the day of mobilization. Straw was procured and placed in 
the Fair Ground buildings, a shower bath was erected 
and the men were made as comfortable as possible. A 
few days later 150 blankets, a field desk and a bugle 
were received from the State and about the same time 
the uniforms purchased for the men arrived. A drill 
schedule of eight hours a day was maintained, to which 
was added two hours of school instruction. 

B Company was designated as the advance unit to 
precede the regiment to Camp Shelby, Mississippi. Orders 
to entrain were received on the morning of August 19th, 
1917, and the company left Rushville on the afternoon 
of the 20th. An impromptu meeting and send-off was 
arranged by the citizens of Rushville and at noon on 
the 20th, the company, headed by a band and delegation 
of citizens, marched through the streets of Rushville 
amid the applause of what was said to have been the 
largest crowd ever assembled in the city. A banquet was 
given to all the men at noon and each man was presented 
with various articles which had been prepared by the 
local Red Cross, as well as a large box of fried chicken, 
which was the biggest asset of all. 



BATTERY A 289 

At Indianapolis a field range was picked up which, with 
the blankets, desk and bugle, constituted the issue prop- 
erty of the organization. The company arrived at Camp 
Shelby about midnight of the 21st and has the distinc- 
tion of being the first of the permanent organizations 
to be stationed at Camp Shelby to reach there. Owing 
to its total lack of equipment, it was known about the 
camp as the "Field Desk and Bugle Brigade." 

After the company arrived at Camp Shelby it was 
quartered for about two weeks in Warehouse No. 9, at 
the expiration of which time it drew its first tents. It 
drew various articles of equipment from time to time 
until the arrival of the regiment on September 27th. 

When the company arrived at Camp Shelby work on 
the Camp had just fairly begun so that the men of the 
organization saw a cut-over pine land and stumps every- 
where. 

The regiment arrived on September 27th and with its 
arrival came the announcement that blue hat cords 
would have to be given up for red as the organization 
had been converted into the 139th Field Artillery. Com- 
pany B and Company A, except for 25 men who were 
assigned to Headquarters Company, were combined to 
make Battery A of the new artillery unit. 

The following is a roster of officers and men of the 
Company prior to its conversion into artillery. Lieutenant 
Wm. A. Kreber having been assigned to the company 
prior to the time of its having left Rushville: 

ROSTER OF COMPANY B, 4TH I:NDIA]VA INFANTRY 

Capt. John H. Kiplinger; residence, Rushville, Ind. ; assigned as Capt. 

Hq. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
1st Lieut. Allan H. Blacklid^e; residence, Rushville, Ind.; assigned 

as 1st Lieut. Bal. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
2d Lieut. William Kreber; residence, Indianapolis, Ind.; assigned as 

2d Lieut. Bat. A 139 F. A Oct. 1, 1917. 



290 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

1st Sergt. Michael P. McCoy; residence, Rushville, Ind.; assigned as 

1st Sergt. Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Mess Sergti William B. Brann; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, to 

Hq. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Supply Ser^, Thomas V. Price; residence, Greensburg, Ind.; trans. 

to Hq: Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Sergt. Guy Newman; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 139 

F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Sergt Jesse 0. Bridge; residence, Arlington, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Sergt. Phillip B. Stapp; residence, Greensburg, Ind.; trans, to Hq. Co. 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Sergt. Telles LaLonde; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, to Hq. Co. 

139 F. A. Oct. 1,1917. 
Sergt, Letcher A. Pope; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, to Hq. 

Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Corp. Lester A. Coons; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Corp. Henry H. Ball; residence, Arlington, Ind.; trans, to Hq. Co. 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Corp. Herbert T. Armstrong; residence, Connersville, Ind.; trans, to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Corp. Charlie Pea; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Corp. to Hq. 

Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Corp. Lawrence Cameron; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Corp. 

to Hq. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Corp. Glen T. Edwards; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Corp. 

to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1,1917. 
Corp. Cleo Emsweller; residence. New Salem, Ind.; trans, as Corp. 

to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Corp. Hartford Sallee; residence, Greensburg, Ind.; trans, as Corp. 

to Hq. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Cook Walter D. English; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Cook 

to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Cook Elmer E. Hendricks; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Cook 

to Hq. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Cook Harry P. Barrett; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Cook to 

Hq. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Cook Patrick J. Devaney; residence, Edinburg, Ind.; trans, as Cook 

to Hq. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Bugler Charles H. Theobold; residence, Batesville, Ind.; trans, as 

Bugle to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Bugler Howard Bankert; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Bugler 

to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Privates, 1st Class 

Cnmmings, Jesse W.; residence, Laurel. Ind.; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. 

to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Bever, Harry L.; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Becraft, Walter G.; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. 

to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Yanatta, Gordon; residence. Laurel, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Colter, John D.; residence, Connersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. 

to Hq. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Reese, Clifford T.; residence. Laurel, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to 

Hq. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Gross^ Glenn; residence, Clarksburg, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to 

Hq. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 



BATTERY A 291 



Privates, 1st Class 

Saunders, Joseph; residence, Rushville, Ind. ; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. 

to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Wilkinson, John W.; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. 

to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Privates 
Adams, Oral; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Alford, Harold J.; residence. Laurel, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Alford, G. James; residence. Laurel. Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bet. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Amrhein, Anthony G.; residence, Greensburg, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. 

to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1. 1917. 
Brown, Louis; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Brown, Henrv E.; residence, Greensburg, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139* F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Bennin^on, Panl; residence, Knightstown, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Beeler, Roy J,; residence. Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Black. Ed L.; residence, Connersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Barnard, Milton F.; residence, Clarksburg, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Beard, Vannie; residence. Laurel, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Burjcrdoerfer, Harry L«; residence, Laurel, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Bnell. Willard; residence, Greensburg, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Bord.er8, John H.; residence, Connersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

42 Div. 
Breckenbridpre. Robert R.; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. 

to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Buchanan, James H.; residence, Milroy, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Cortelyon, Charles; residence, Connersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. 

to Ha. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1. 1917. 
Cripe, Clvde; residence, Rushville, Ind.; discharged. 
Calpha. Glenn H.: residence. Laurel, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Cllne, Jesse M.; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Cleven^er, Charles; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1. 1917. 
Clevenper. Wilber H.: residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Clark, Ralph W.; residence, Connersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Cox. Floyd; residence. Clarksburg, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Conway, Robert R,; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Hq. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Christopher. Thomas; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Christopher, William L.; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. 

to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 



292 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Privates 

Dou^oud, Clarence E.; residence, Gonnersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. 

to Bat A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Dudgeon, Carl R.; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Fritter, Harry- R,; residence, Shelbyville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Feeback, Sam H.; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Farley Frank; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Fisher, Lawrence A,; residence, Greensburg, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. 

to Hq. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Green, Edward E.; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Gallimore, Floyd; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

42 Div. 
Gardner, Sam; residence, Arlington, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Gardner, Leland; residence, Arlington, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Green, John W.; residence. Mulhousen, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Higgins, Raymond F.; residence, New Salem, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. 

to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Holmes, Hollis G.; residence, Gonnersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Hokey, Charles; residence, Gonnersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Harden, William H.; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

42 Div. 
Holliday, Roy; residence, Rushville, Ind. T trans, as Pvt. to 42 Div. 
Hughes, Daniel K.; residence, Rushville. Ind.; discharged. 
Hamilton, Raymond; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

42 Div. 
Hamilton, Gilbert P.; residence, Gonnersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. 

to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Isaac, Howard, W.; residence, Gonnersville, Ind.; discharged. 
Johnson, Ernest; residence. Laurel, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Kraus, Earl N.; residence, Gonnersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Hq. Go. 139 F. A. Oct. 1. 1917. 
Keith, Lovell; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Koons, Paul C; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Hq. 

Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Kingery, Herbert; residence, Gonnersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. 

to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Lanning, Jesse M.; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Lanning, Robert G.; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Loyd^ Irvin A.; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Land, Ray C; residence, West Port, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Manning, Paul B,; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 



BATTERY A 293 



Privates 
Montgomery, Roy L,; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. td Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1 1917. 
Morgan, Frank W.; residence, Connersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Meal, Chester A.; residence, Manila, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1 1917. 
Miner, Raymond M^; residence, Greenburg, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Maple, Herbert D.; residence. New Salem, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1. 1917. 
Miller, Howard; residence, Connersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Hq. Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Moore, Donald I).; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Myers, George W.; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Hq. 

Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Myers, William C; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Mvers, Virgil R,; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

*A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Myers, Julius; residence, Connersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Motts, Frank; residence, Connersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
McCarty, Fred; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
McNally, John C; residence. Connersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Northam, Merrill M.; residence. Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Xewland, Oren E.; residence, Connersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Xash, Herbert; residence, Clarksburg, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1. 1917. 
Nicholson, Frank; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1. 1917. 
Oakley, Roy J.; residence. Greensburg, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Hq. 

Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Phenis, Charles A.; residence. Connersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Perkins, Fred H.; residence, Connersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt, to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Pindell, Charles R,; residence, Laurel, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Perkins, Lewis; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Pea, Omer; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 139 

F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Pea, Howard; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Pea, Ralph; residence. Rushville. Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Pease, Donald, E.; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1. 1917. 
Peters, William A. F.; residence, Connersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. 

to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Peters, Henry; residence, Connersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Hq. 

Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1. 1917. 



294 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Priyates 

Peters, Carl; residence, Connersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Hq. 

Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Roberts, Lytle; residence, Connersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Rosrers, Irvin C; residence, Connersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Ricketts, Forrest; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, to 42 Div. 
Riley, Clarence E.; residence, Greensburg, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Rawlin^, Don; residence, Milroy, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Hq. Co. 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Ruble, George. M.; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Rnble, Jesse E.; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Robeson, Willie L.; residence, Milroy, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Scott, James L.; residence, Connersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Hq. 

Co. 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Scott, Wallace S.; residence, Andersonville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Stler, Raymond E.; residence, Connersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Snider, Edward A.; residence, Greensburg, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Snyder, Walter M.; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Switzer, Carl; residence, Connersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Stites, George W.; residence, Henderson, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Smith, Fred; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Smith, Henry; residence. Laurel, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 42 Div. 
Spillman, Earl D,; residence, Milroy, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Taylor, Elmer E.; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Taylor, Jesse J.; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Troxell, Edgar; residence, Connersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Theobold, Jacob W.; residence, Batesville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Thorp, Elmer L.; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
VanSickle, Alva H. ; residence, Rushville, Ind. ; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Wrigley, John; residence, Connersville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Weir, Ernest G.; residence. Laurel, Ind,; trans, as Pvt. to 42 Div. 
Wagoner, Ralph; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
West, Edward. D.; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Whiteman, Howard C; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt, to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 



BATTERY A 295 

Priyates 
Whitton, Frank P.; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 

Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Wiley, Colonel J.; residence, Milroy, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. A 

139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Weed, Charles R,; residence, Rushville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. 

A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Wheeldon, Grover I.; residence, Greensburg, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. 

to Bat. A 139 F. A. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Wallace, Grover; residence, Greensburg, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 




CAPTAIN MARK A. DAWSON 



BATTERY A, I39th F. A. 
"Twenty Years After" 

"Yea," the speaker was none other than "Red" Cox, 
ex-Corporal in "Camouflage" Kumpf s section, "it was 
a great old war, *Hip-Shot/ " 

"It surely was. Why say I remember the day that *Mike' 
McCoy lined up old Battery *A,' and she was some old 
battery. Cap Dunn was on the job then, and Lord, but 
he and Colonel Bob sure put us thru the paces doing 
squads east and west over the stumps of Mississippi." 
"Hip-Shot" Parr sat swinging one leg over the pommel 
of his Mexican saddle. "We were in quarantine for the 
measles about that time and 'Newt' took us on that hike 
and we got our mess-kits all black trying to cook that 
one spud." 

"Them sure was the good old days, but we didn't know 
it then. We had a canteen of our own then and could 
buy anything that they had, only they never had a 
whole lot. You was over to the 4th Field then wasn't 
you, 'Hip-Shot?'" 

"I'll swear that 1 was. Me and 'Bolo' Pete wasn't on 
awful good terms and he used to give me considerable 
mule exercise. 'Bolo' is a first loot now. Lord, but he 
was hard and we was only rookies." 

"We went out to Berlin Hill while you was there and 
if we didn't dig up that back forty, I'll go to — well, you 
know where I mean. Yea, I've quit swearing. We got 
our first OD's there and we had to carry our barracks 
bags back. That rebel Major used to ride his horse up 
and down those hills and say 'Follow your Major, boys!' 
I sure used to work some of the boys. Me and Tatty' 
Patterson, he used to be our overseer." 

20 



298 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

"Yea, pretty soon after that Loot Boggs got us out 
doing bayonet drill. Never did so much work in my life. 
You know I never could figure out why we corporals had 
to do that heavy work. It was a terrible struggle but 
by the time I got back from my Christmas furlough, the 
president decided that we didn't need bayoneting so 
they had quit." 

"Well, they went us one better when they gave us 
that gas drill. 'Cookie' said that he would rather be 
gassed than drown in his own spit. They even kept that 
up when we got to the rifle-range." 

"I'll tell you, 'Red,' I'd rather shoot my old 45 than 
a 30-30 any old day. Why that wooden gun of Bob's 
beats a 30-30. Cap Dunn left us there and we got did 
'Artie' Donan in exchange. He started us in on the old 
3-inch. The BC Detail was started then and I sure was 
one gold-brick for a while. I didn't feel right on pay- 
days, so I quit." 

"That is close. The old 4.7 beat a 3-inch any day in 
the week. Remember those gun holes that we dug. They 
sent that June Replacement outfit away then. I would 
have liked to have gone but they called it a draft, so I 
passes. We sure copped on to a lot of watermelons then. 
They marched us to Lumberton about then. I never 
walked so far in my life." 

"No and if some of them there officers had to carry 
packs like we did we wouldn't have got out of camp." 

"Aint it so. Remember those hob-nails we drew? Tilley 
and that bunch. We ought to be proud of them." 

"I was still on the BC Detail when they won them 
gold medals for the fastest semaphore outfit in Camp 
and we had her. I could a made it, but I wanted some 
of the others to get in on the winnings. But that is all 



BATTERY A 299 

past history. Artie took us to Camp Upton and we got 
a lot of new stuff from a tin hat to our hobs. We 
mounted the old ship *Cedric* and — " 

"Boom-BOOM. Old 'Camouflage' sure was a sick boy. 
He'll never get over that if he lives to be a million. That 
was some rest camp they sent us to, wasn't it? 

"Yea, if you wanted us to rest our stomachs. Colonel 
Bob didn't want anybody but his officers to drink that 
stuff they sold at Codford, but we fooled him, eh, *Red?' 
He always did think more of us than he did of his 
officers. Yea!" 

"My old chief of section pulled the best of the army 
when he slept in a life-boat coming across the channel." 

"Yea, can you imagine that? Old Artie was pretty 
sick there and we had to leave him at Cherbourg. He 
wasn't as bad as a lot that I have met since. We got 
our first cognac there. Lord but that stuff had a kick. 
And that ride that we took in the box-cars from there 
to Ploermel! Remember that?" 

"Do I? Say, bo, could a man ever forget that he was 
once in a place with thirty-nine others, where they would 
rather put eight horses? Say, wasn't that bread some 
swell? I've been on many a bum since then, *Hip-Shot,' 
but never one like that. I guess that old 'A' Battery sure 
opened on that town of Ploermel." 

"You tell em." 

"Remember Bertha?" 

"Do I?" 

"Well, there was once when we got enough to drink. 
The whole trouble was in taking it back up the steps 
at the school. Say, it was farther up them steps than it 
is up that hill. Too, bad we didn't have more money!" 

"Aintitso." 



300 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

"Remember that half hike and half ride to camp de 
Meucon? Lord it was muddy when we got there." 

"I wish that I had my old gums there. We did our 
first real fighting there. That gas drill almost got my 
goat when we had to start again. Wasn't them 155s 
bears?" 

"You tell em." 

"I guess that the old man showed some of them there 
officers how to handle em. Well, he ought to. He joined 
us just before that, and 1*11 never forget how 'Brownie' 
had to look up at him." 

"You was in Vannes wasn't you?" 

"Was I?" 

"Well, the base hospital had it all over that place when 
it came to real eats and drinks." 

"They was both pretty good. We thought that we were 
in mud there, but say, do you remember the mud that 
we hit at Brest at Pontanezen Barracks. There is more 
mud there than there is in the Missouri. That was a 
long wait that we put in there." 

"Wasn't it? We was a guarjd of honor or something 
like that for President Wilson, wasn't we? I'll bet that 
he was tickled to death to see us there." 

"Yea." 

"Colonel Bob got a straight tip that we were going 
back on battle-ships, but I've seen a lot of them straight 
tips go on the wrong side of the fence. But we got old 
Woodrow's tub back. She was some tub." 

"Ain't it so. We sure got some grub on that boat." 

"The old man got us in good there. It was about our 
time, for we had a lot of dirty work before that. Some 
of those boys sure did bring up the eats. The only thing 
that we got slowed on was candy. Colonel Bob decided 



1ST LT. RUSSEL FIGERT 2ND LT. SMILEY N. CHAMBERS 

2ND LT. CHAS. H. GILLILAND 1ST LT. ALLEN H. BLACKLIDGE 



302 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

that he liked us better than he did the officers, so he 
decided that only they could eat any candy. He sure 
looked after us." 

"Yea, but we got ours." 

"You tell em. Them sailors liked us better than they 
did the officers, so thej^ put out to us. That was a great 
old trip." 

"Yea." 

KOSTER OF BATTERY A, 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Capt Mark A. Dawson, commissioned June 23, 1917; residence, 5356 

Ohmer avenue, Indianapolis, Ind.; assigned to Bat. Nov. 13, 1918, 

Camp De Meucon, France. 
Capt. Charlie R. Dunn, residence, Decatur, Ind.; trans. Feb. 1, 1918 

to 113th Ammunition Train. 
Capt. Arthur Donan, residence, Kentucky; trans. Oct. 23, 1918, to 

British Hospital, Tourville France. 
1st Lieut, Allan H. Blacklidge, commissioned May 3, 1917; residence, 

823 N. Main street, Rushville, Ind.; trans, to Bat. A Oct. 1, 1917. 
2d Lieut. Smiley N. Chambers, commissioned Aug. 15, 1917; residence, 

1555 Broadway, Indianapolis, Ind.; trans, to Bat. from Bat. F. 
2d Lieut. LaMar K. Baxter, commissioned April 19, 1918; residence, 

Odon, Ohio; assigned to Bat. 
2d Lieut. (Attached.) Charles H. Gilliland, commissioned April 19, 1918; 

residence, R. F. D. 8, Valparaiso, Ind.; attached to Bat. 
1st Ser^'t. Dallas Brown, enlisted April 27. 1917; residence, 223 N. 

First street, Decatur, Ind.; appointed 1st Sergt. June 10, 1918. 
Mess Ser^, Burt J. Hower, enlisted July 1, 1917; residence, Decatur, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Oct. 1, 1917; appointed Corp. March 15, 

1918; appointed Sergt. April 27, 1918; appointed Mess Sergt. 

April 27, 1918. 
Supply Serfft. Lloyd D. Beery, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence. 

Decatur, Ind.; appointed Sup. Sergt. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Serfft. Fred M. Elzey, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Serpt. James B. Brill, enlisted Aug. 13, 1917; residence, 608 N. New 

Jersey street. Indianapolis, Ind.; trans, to Bat. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Sergt. Lester A. Coons, enlisted April 18, 1917; residence, 534 Morgan 

street, Rushville. Ind.; trans, to Bat. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Sergt. Joe Mct'onnell, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence 522 St. Marys 

street, Decatur, Ind.; appointed Sergt. Dec. 27, 1917. 
Sergt. Sherman Kumpf, enlisted May 31, 1917; residence, 410 E. 

Cherry street, Bluffton, Ind.; appointed Corp. Oct. 1, 1917; 

appointed Sergt. March 15, 1918. 
Sergt, Joseph C. Laurent, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Decatur, 

Ind.; appointed Sergt. May 13, 1918. 
Sergt Paul H. Cook, enlisted June 11, 1917; residence, Poneto, Ind.; 

appointed Sergt. June 13, 1918. 
Sergt. Charles F. Fryback, enlisted July 25, 1917; 311 E. Market street. 

Bluffton, Ind.; appointed Corp. Oct. 1, 1917; appointed Sergt. 

July 16, 1918. 



BATTERY A 303 

Ser^ Eay C. Land, enlisted June 5, 1917; residence, West Port, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. May 23, 1917; appointed Sergt. Sept. 9, 1918. 
Sergt Harry B. Smith, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Bluffton, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Oct. 1, 1917; appointed Corp. May 22, 

1918; appointed Sergt. Sept. 9. 1918. 
Corp. Donald C. Patterson, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Decatur, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. A Oct. 1, 1917. 
Corp. Bernard Keller, enlisted April 27, 1917 ; residence, Decatur, Ind. ; 

trans, to Bat. A Oct. 1, 1917. 
Corp. Leo Ehlinprer, enlisted May 9. 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Corp. Harry Parr, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Corp. James H. Ward, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. March 1, 1918. 
Corp. Floyd Cox, enlisted June 4, 1917; residence, Clarksburg, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. March 1, 1918. 
Corp. Leo Bo^er, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. March 15, 1918. 
Corp. Edward A. Jaberg, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Magley, 

Ind.; appointed Corp. March 15, 1918. 
Corp. Paul M. Gurtner, enlisted Sept. 21. 1917; residence, Wabash, 

Ind.; appointed Corp. March 15, 1918. 
Corp. Edward E. Greene, enlisted June 16, 1917; residence, Conners- 

ville, Ind.; appointed Corp. March 15, 1918. 
Corp. Raymond M. Miner, enlisted May 19, 1918; residence. Greens- 
burg, Ind.; appointed Corp. March 15, 1918. 
Corp. Raymond M. Pindell, enlisted July 27, 1917; residence, Laurel. 

Ind.; appointed Corp. March 15, 1918. 
Corp. James K. Staley, enlisted June 29, 1917; residence, Decatur, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Oct. 1, 1917; appointed Corp. April 5, 1918. 
Corp. Walter G. Beeraff, enlisted June 23, 1917; residence, Nebraska, 

Ind.: appointed Corp. April 5, 1918. 
Corp. Willie L. Robeson, enlisted June 3, 1917; residence, Milroy, 

Ind.; appointed Corp. May 23, 1918. 
Corp. Lynn Shoemaker, enlisted May 29, 1917; residence, 933 N. Mer- 
idian street, Indianapolis, Ind.; appointed Corp. May 23, 1918. 
Corp. Harold J. Alford, enlisted July 27, 1917; residence. Laurel, Ind. 

appointed Corp. July 16, 1918. 
Corp. Herman E. Emery, enlisted June 11, 1917; residence, Berne, Ind. 

appointed Corp. Sept. 20, 1918. 
Corp. Floyd G. Enos, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind. 

appointed Corp. Sept. 20, 1918. 
Corp. Howard Hixon, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Bluffton, Ind. 

appointed Corp. Sept. 20, 1918. 
Corp. Sam H. Feeback, enlisted June 5, 1917; residence, Paris, Ky. 

appointed Corp. Oct. 9, 1918. 
Corp. Harry L. Bnrffdoerfer, enlisted July 29, 1917; residence. Laurel 

Ind.; appointed Corp. Nov. 21, 1918. 
Corp. Cass Bacon, enlisted April 25, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind. 

appointed Corp. Nov. 21, 1918. 
Corp. Herbert Kern, enlisted June 11, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind. 

appointed Corp. Nov. 21, 1918. 
Cook Heber Fonner, enlisted June 11, 1917; residence Dpcatur. Ind. 

trans, to Bat. A Oct. 1. 1937. 
Cook John J. Mcriellan, unlisted Sept. 21. 1917; resi^^'^nce, 147 C^trell 

avenue, Detroit. Mich.; appointed Cook Nov. 21, 1918. 
Cook Homer PnrrNh, enlisted May 29, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind.: 

appointed Cook April 19, 1918. 



U04 THE STORY OF THE 139TJi. FIELD ARTILLERY 

Cook Grover JE Wheeldoii* enlisted July 25, 1917; residence, We^tport, 

Ind.; appointed Go»k April 19, 1918. 
Chief Mech. Frank 3Iotts, enlisted June 23, 1917; residence, Conners- 

ville, Ind.;- appointed Chief Mech. Feb. 19, 1918. 
Chief Mech. George Stites, enlisted July 23, 1917; residence, Henderson, 

Ind.; appointed Chief Mech. May 23, 1918. 
Mech. Carroll Bacon, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Decatur, Tnd.'; 

appointed Mech. July 11, 1918. 
Mech. Invin R. Butler, enlisted May 27, 1917 ; residence, Decatur, Ind. ; 

appointed Mech. Feb. 19, 1918. 
Mech. Chester A. Meal, enlisted June 14, 1917; residence, Manilla, Ind.; 

appointed Mech. Nov. 21, 1918. 
Mech. Edward A. Snider, enlisted June 15, 1917; residence, Greensburg, 

Ind.; appointed Mech. Feb. 19, 1918. 
Saddler Giles 0. Smelser, enlisted June 29, 1917; residence, Celina, O.; 

appointed Saddler Dec. 28, 1917. 
Wag. Hosea Andrews, enlisted June 11, 1917; residence, Portland, Ind.; 

appointed Wag. Nov. 21, 1918. 
Wag. Vannie Beard^ enlisted Aug. 20, 1917; residence. Laurel, Ind.; 

appointed Wag. Nov. 21, 1918. 
Wag. Carl R. Dudgeon, enlisted June 23, 1917; residence. Rushville, 

Ind.; appointed Wag. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Wag. Carlisle D. Flanders, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Decatur, 

Ind.; appointed Wag. Nov. 21, 1918. 
Wag. Karl D. Hileman, enlisted Sept. 21, 1917; residence. North Man- 
chester, Ind.; appointed Wag. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Wag. Hickman W. Iholts, enlisted Sept. 21, 1917; residence, North Man- 
chester, Ind.; appointed Wag. Aug. 9, 1918. 
Wag. Ernest Johnson, enlisted July 30, 1917; residence. Laurel, Ind.; 

appointed Wag. Nov. 21, 1918. 
Wag. Jesse M. Lanning, enlisted June 30, 1917; residence, Brookville, 

Ind.; appointed Wag. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Wag. Robert G. Lanning, enlisted July 4, 1917; residence, Brookville, 

Ind.; appointed Wag. Aug. 9, 1918. 
Wag. Charles Malony, enlisted June 11, 1917; residence, Monroe, Ind.; 

appointed Wag. Aug. 9, 1918. 
Wag. Herbert L. Maple, enlisted April 28, 1917; residence, New Salem, 

Ind.; appointed Wag. Feb. 19, 1918. 
Wag. Hubert Miller, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Magley, Ind.; 

appointed Wag. Aug. 9, 1918. 
Wag. Otto Miller, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Magley, Ind.; 

appointed Wag. Aug. 9, 1918. 
Wag. Oren E. P. N^ewland, enlisted June 23, 1917; residence, Everton, 

Ind.; appointed Wag. Feb. 19, 1918. 
Wag. Merrill M. Jfortham, enlisted April 18, 1917', residence, Rushville, 

Ind.; appointed Wag. Nov. 21, 1918. 
Wag. Edgar Troxell, enlisted Aug. 20, 1917; residence, Connersville, 

Ind.; appointed Wag. Feb. 19, 1918. 
Wag. Edgar Tyner, enlisted Oct. 5, 1917; residence. North Manchester, 

Ind.; appointed Wag. Aug. 9, 1918. 
Wag. Medford Wynn, enlisted May 29, 1917; residence, Bluffton, Ind.; 

appointed Wag. Nov. 21, 1918. 
Bugler Herman Haag, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat, A Oct. 1, 1917. 
Bugler Charles H. Theobald., enlisted June 16, 1917; residence. Sunman, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. A Oct. 1, 1917. 
Bugler Jacob W. Theobald, enlisted Aug. 20, 1917; residence, Sunman. 

Ind.; appointed Bugler Feb. 19, 1918. 



BATTERY A 305 



Priyates, 1st Class 

Bair, John C. J^ enlisted June 30, 1917; residence, Bryant, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 9, 1918. 
Borne, Gust M., enlisted May 17, 1917; residence, Magley, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Jan. 1, 1918. 
Brinneman, Jefferson, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Liberty 

Center, Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. July 11, 1918. 
Brown, Henry E^ enlisted June 4, 1917; residence, Greensburg, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. July 11, 1918. 
Buchanan, James E., enlisted July 26, 1917; residence, Greensburg, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. July 11, 1918. 
Christopher, Thomas, enlisted April 18, 1917; residence, Rushville, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Coffin^, Clarence Y., enlisted May 24, 1918; residence, Vicksburg, 

Miss.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 21, 1918. 
Colter, John 1)., enlisted June 4, 1917; residence, Cdnnersville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 7, 1917. 
Gardner, Leland C^ enlisted June 16. 1917; residence, Arlington, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. July 11, 1918. 
Glynn, James, enlisted June 23, 1918; residence, 460 Bowen avenue, 

Chicago, 111.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 21, 1918. 
Graul, Peter, enlisted May 25, 1918; residence, MaScoutah, 111.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 21, 1918. 
Grossman, Earl, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Itome City, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 1, 1918. 
Hammond, Walter, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 1, 1918. 
Hartman, Charles E^ enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Mt. Carroll, 

111.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 21, 1918. 
Herman, Hilbert 0., enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, 50^ East Forty- 
fourth street, Chicago, 111.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 21, 1918. 
Holmes, Hollis, enlisted April 28, 1917; residence, Connersville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Howell, Clem H^ enlisted June 13, 1918; residence, Wills Point, Tex.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 21, 1918. 
Jakubouski, Louis, enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, 3239 Wall street, 

Chicago, 111.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 21, 1918. 
James, Russell D^ enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, 712 South Kaeler 

avenue, Chicago, 111.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 21, 1918. 
Keith, Lovell 0., enlisted May 17, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 1, 1918. 
Kingery, Herbert, enlisted June 23, 1917; residence, Everton, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 1, 1918. 
Knavel, May M^ enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Sturgis, Mich.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 1, 1918. 
May, Lee, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind.; appointed 

Pvt. 1 cl. July 11, 1918. 
Miller Homer B., enlisted June 29, 1917; residence, Bluffton, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. July 11, 1918. 
Miller, Ralph E., enlisted Sept. 21, 1917; residence. North Manchaster, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 9, 1918. 
Morgan, Charles H., enlisted June 29, 1917; residence, Monroe, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. July 11, 1918. 
Morgan, Frank, enlisted June 14, 1917; residence. College Corner, 

Ohio; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 9, 1918. 
Mowrey, Howard A., enlisted June 11, 1917; residence, Bluffton, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Oct. 1, 1917. 



306 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Nash, Herbert, enlisted June 4, 1917; residence, Warren, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 9, 1918. 
Nicholson, Frank, enlisted May 15, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 7, 1917. 
Pea, Howard, enlisted April 18, 1917; residence, 834 College avenue, 

Indianapolis, Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 9, 1918. 
Pease, Donald, enlisted May 5, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 9, 1918. 
Perkins, Lewis, enlisted June 5, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 1, 1918. 
Rotter, Ernest W^ enlisted May 25, 1918; residence, Edwardsville, 

111.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 21, 1918. 
Saunders, Joseph, enlisted June 14, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Feb. 1, 1918. 
Stier, Raymond E., enlisted April 28, 1917; residence, 11 South 

Harriett street, Evansville, Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Thorp, Elmer L^ enlisted July 28, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind. 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Yannatta, Gordon, enlisted July 27, 1917; residence. Laurel, Ind. 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 9, 1918. 
Yansickle, Alva H^ enlisted June 5, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind. 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 1, 1918. 
Venis, Glenn, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind. 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Feb. 1, 1918. 
Walker, Kenneth 0^ enlisted April 18, 1917; residence, Rushville. 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. July 11, 1918. 
Wasserfall, Robert 0., enlisted May 15, 1918; residence, corner Ninth 

and Laurel, Highland, 111.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 21, 1918. 
Weber, Clarence, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 9, 1918. 
Wiley, Colonel J^ enlisted June 16, 1917; residence, Milroy, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Feb. 1, 1918. 
Zeigler, Joseph H., enlisted May 26, 1918; residence, Ebenezer, Miss.: 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 21, 1918. 



Company C, 4th Indiana Infantry 

The company was organized in Huntington, Indiana, 
in the spring of 1917, and was composed of men from 
Huntington and Wabash Counties. It was organized by 
Oscar D. Dyer of Huntington, and Travis S. Whitsel of 
Wabash, Indiana, assisted by the Commercial Club of 
Huntington, and the fact that it was finally accepted by 
the State of Indiana as an integral part of the Indiana 
National Guard, is due entirely to their untiring efforts. 

It was intended to organize a battery of artillery, but 
there being no vacancy in the artillery units, the organ- 
izers asked and were granted permission to raise an 
infantry company. As such it was accepted by the State 
and was assigned to the newly organized 4th Indiana 
Infantry as Company C. 

On June 24th, 1917, Messrs. Dyer and Whitsel were 
commissioned Lieutenants of Infantry and assigned to 
Company C. Frank E. Livengood, Captain of Infantry, 
Indiana National Guard, was assigned as Commanding 
Officer. Shortly afterward the company was inspected 
by Major Heit, U. S. Army, under orders from the Depart- 
ment of Militia Affairs, and as a consequence of the good 
showing made, was extended Federal recognition. 

The company was mobilized Sunday, August 5th, 1917, 
at the County Fair Grounds in Huntington, Indiana, for 
service in the war against Germany. In response to the 
mobilization order every member reported promptly, there 
not being a single absentee. Active training commenced 
the next day and when the company was taken to Fort 
Benjamin Harrison, Indiana, to join the regiment, after 
only one month at their home station, they were fairly 
trained as infantrymen. 




CAPTAIN FRANK E. LIVENGOOD 



BATTERY B 



309 



The manner in which these men, coming as they did 
from every walk of life, adapted themselves to things 
military, and became excellent soldiers, was the cause 
of much favorable comment by every one who had the 
opportunity to watch them develop. Their rapid progress 
was largely due to the esprit de corps of the company, 
as every man appreciated the fact that the people of 
his home county were interested in, and watching their 
development as soldiers. The showing they made as 
infantrymen, and later as artillerymen, must be a source 
of pride to their relatives and friends at home as well 
as the officers who were assigned the task of training 
them. 

Chroiiolo^cal Record of Company C 

Organization commenced April 3rd, 1917. 

Mustered into State service May 1st, 1917. 

Extended Federal recognition June, 1917. 

Mobilized for war August 5tli, 1917. 

Joined Regiment September 5th, 1917. 

Accompanied Regiment to Camp Shelby, Mississippi, September 
25th, 1917. 

Consolidated with Company D, Indiana Infantry, as Battery B, 
139th Field Artillery, October 1st, 1917. 



ROSTER OF COMPAinr C, 4TH K^DIANA INFANTRY 



Capt. Frank E. Livengood 
1st Lieut. Oscar D. Dyer 
2d Lieut. Travis S. Whitsel 
1st Sergt. Chas. H. Brown 
Sup. Sergt. DeLorus L. Heren- 

deen 
Mess Sergt. Virgil O. Priddy 
Sergt. Russell R. Clark 
Sergt. Bruce Harnish 
Sergt. Edwin G. Calhoun 
Sergt. Fred Mitchell 
Sergt. U. Gale Coolman 
Sergt. Oved E. Holmes 
Sergt. Harry N. Johnson 
Sergt. Robert J. Howard 
Corp. Marion Sliger 
Corp. Dale Cathers 
Corp. Herschel H. Griffith 
Corp. Jacob C. Smith 



Corp. Alfred D. Smith 
Corp. Kenneth Elliot 
Corp. Cecil Humbert 
Corp. John J. Mossman 
Corp. Murlin C. Rupert 
Corp. Victor A. Murphy 
, Corp. Arthur Gronninger 
Corp. Guy dinger 
Corp. William McCoy 
Corp. Martin Collins 
Corp. John O. Hildebrand 
Corp. Wayne Sewell 
Cook Carl W. Calhoun 
Cook Everett R. Guntle 
Corp. Ward S. Cowgill 
Mech. Eugene P. Buckingham 
Bugler John Kreisel 
Bugler Fred R. Beyler 



310 



THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 



Changes in N. C. O.'s Prior to October 1st, 1917 



To Be Corporals: 
Clyde P. Timmons 
Herman J. Becker 
Galen C. Williams 



To be Mechanic: 
Roy King 



Privates at Date of Muster into Federal Service 



Privates : 

Aughinbaugh, Burley W. 
Beckman, Alfred G. 

B'ergauer, Germaine 
Berry, Ernest D. 

Boyer, Wm. H. 

Broderick, Howard H. 

Broom, Marien D. 

Carpenter, Harley C. 

Carroll, Francis W. 

Cherry, Geo. H. 

Chesterman, Burton L. 

Clark, Howard 

Coble, Alfred D. 

Conklin, LeRoy 

Corn, Roscoe R. 

Cosselli, Phillip M. 

Couch, Arlie L. 

Crago, Roy L. 

Deeds, Glen E. 

Deeds, Marion E. 

Duncan, Glenn A. 

Fabe, Carl 

Fahrnow, Carl J. 

Fahrnow, Herbert D. 

Fleming, Albert 
■ Forst, Sherman W. 

Fulton, Geo. H. 

Grossnickle, Glen H. 

Guethler, Mathias G. 

Gamble, 

Haneline. Raymond P. 

Hawn, Chas. P. 

Heck, Wilbur, F. 

Henry, Paul H. 

Hoover, Orville G. 

Houser, y^rlie M. 

Hou«?pr. Fred C. 

Huffman, Roy L. 

Isenberg, Harold L. 

Jacobs. Frank L. 

Johnson, Ferd M. 

Jones, Bruce 

Jones, Wiley O. 

Ke^ser, D^wey M. 

Kinsev, Arthur L. 

KInsey, Henry L. 

Kram^^r. S. T. 

La Bar, Everett H. 

Lindermann. Afher 



Privates : 
Lindzy, Arthur C. 
Lister, Glen F. 
Martin, Chas. F. 
Marshall, Roy E. 
Meese, Emmett C. 
Miller, Odes 
Miller, R. V. 
Minton, Ralph W. 
Morris, Harold A. 
Murphy, Henry G. 
Murphy, L. R. 
McDonald, Wm. 
McGath, Arthur 
Osborn, Virgil 
Ov6rholser, Don W. 
Palmer, Fred 
Parker, Forrest L. 
Parker, Paul M. 
Perry, Ernest 
Poe, Paul V. 
Powell, Floyd W. 
Pressler, Ervin A. 
Prowell, Frank W. 
Randall. Harold M. 
Raymer, Ralph V. 
Ribley, Leon J. 
Rosen, Ernest F. 
Roush, Chas. B. 
Rusler, Geo. L. 
Santon, Edgar R. 
Sho«^maker, Lloyd 
Shoemaker. Ora 
Shull. Alvie I. 
Siagrl, Chas. F. 
Slusser. John L. 
Smithers. Wilber A 
Smith, Harrv W. 
Smith, Ivan W. 
Sr.iith. Ross I. 
Snvffer. Orville J. 
South. Llovd W. 
*^*°vens, Raymond L. 
Sutton, Floyd H. 
Swain. Everett 
SAvearers, Charley G. 
Temple. Oyn. 
Thorn, B'^n.i. H. 
Tobias, Glen D. 
Turner. Geo. R. 



BATTERY B 311 



Ware, Ray S. Wilson, Virgil P. 

Watson, Chas. H. Woods, Paul J. 

Watts, Buford F. R. Yeiter, Frank D. 

W- eddle, Geo. I. Yocum, Ernst 

Williford, Ralph J. Zobrosky, Lawrence 



Men Transferred to the 150th Field Artillery in August, 1917 

Privates : Privates : 

Corn, Benj. Swain, Everett 

Linderman, Asher Temple, Oyn 

Shoemaker, Ora G. Crago, Roy L. 
Shiill, Alvie I. 



Joined at Fort Benjamin Harrison After Muster into Federal Service 

Privates : Privates : 

Adams, Isaac C. Hildebrand, Paul V. 

Daily, Oliver Mavrogenis, Harry 

Harnish, Glen Ripley, Robt. G. 

Hefner, John L. Heeter, Jacob J. 



Company D, 4th Indiana Infantry 

On Sunday, May 6th, 1917, everj^ man who had enlisted 
in Company D, 4th Indiana Infantry, held an invitation 
which did not read quite like the ones he had been 
receiving in civil life. Instead of it reading *Tlease call 
at," it read "You are commanded to report at the Armory 
at 341 Virginia Avenue." Well, some men were offended 
at the word "commanded," but the same word put a 
little fear in most of them and we had a good crowd. 

At that time Nathan A. Morris was Captain, Stewart 
Jackson 1st Lieutenant and Edwin C. Ball 2d Lieutenant, 
and when Lieutenant Ball in his strong voice said "fall 
in" — we did and fell all over everybody else in trying 
to get in place. We did a few facings and marched a 
while in column and were then informed that from that 
day on there would be drill twice weekly, Monday and 
Friday nights, until we were mustered into service, and 
that we were to receive state pay for every night we 



312 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

drilled, which was twenty-five cents per night. We drilled 
twenty nights, then of course we got the pay— not— and 
after the money was spent, they were kind enough to 
ask us if it was alright to put our state pay in the 
mess fund, as it only amounted to $4.00 or $5.00. 
Naturally we had to consent (after it was already done), 
but I don't think anybody was sorry that they did it, 
because we had fine "chow" from our mess fund. 

It was surely an awful looking outfit that marched 
to the State Fair Grounds on August 5th. Some had 
on their good clothes, walking shoes with Panama, sailor, 
derby and soft hats and caps — others wisely wore their 
old clothes — nothing the same color. We had some men 
who were street car conductors who wore their uniforms. 

The company trained with the units of the regiment 
that were at the Fair Grounds, remaining there until 
the end of August, when the regiment assembled at 
Fort Benjamin Harrison. Here we remained until the 
last of September, when we took the train for Camp 
Shelby, Mississippi. 

On October 1st, 1917, Companies C and D were con- 
solidated and became Battery B, 139th F. A. Our cap- 
tain, Nathan Morris, was placed in command of the 
battery and we began our training as artillery. 

ROSTER OF COMPANY D, 4TH INDIANA INFANTRY 

Capt. Nathan A. Morris Privates : 

1st Lieut. Stewart Jackson Boggs, Ralph D. 

2d Lieut. Edwin C. Ball, Jr Bray, OIlie M. 

1st Sergt. Allen M. Ball Breeding, Roy S. 

Sergt. Wilson I. McGufir Brinson, Bonnie B. 

Privates: Brophy, John Wilbur 

Abstein, Meyer Brown, Leslie 

Bailey, George Burgett, Roscoe B. 

Ballard, George W. Burton. Harry A. 

Bauer, Louis Casey, Dan 

Bea, Leonard W. Castle, Prank J. 

Bell, Lloyd E. Chapman, Frank J. 

Began, Perry L. Cherry. Sidney L 



BATTERY B 



313 



Privates : 
Cline, Adrian 
Cook, Rubert J. 
Dalton, Ernest 
Davis, Louis B. 
Donnelley, Elmer V. 
Dove, Walter 
Edison, Francis A. 
Elmore, Thomas B. 
Enslin, Harry 
Evans, Omer T. 
Farb, Joseph 
Flisk, Martin L. 
Freeman, Reno E. 
Frbst, John R. 
Gerber, Charles B. 
Goldberg, Amor 
Goldstein, Joseph 
Grady, Archie O. 
Green, Clarence C. 
Griffin, George A. 
Griswold, William H. 
Harkins, Frank M. 
Haught, Arthur R. 
Healy, Lawrence H. 
Healy, William J. 
Hendricks, Oscar J. 
Hocker, Robert J. 
Hollowitz, Samuel 
Hogan, Thomas J. 
Horton, Clair T. 
Hinkle, Vernal E. 
Hullinger, Ralph 
Hurst, Stanley E. 
Jackson, Arthur L. 
Jacobs, Lester 
Johnson, Walter J. 
Kelley, Thomas H. 
Kerr, William 
Kesler, Paul R. 
Kindig, George E. 
Klein, Robert H. 
Kline, Harry 
Ladasky, Robert 
Laffey, Thomas B. 
LaMaster, Lee A. 
Landreth, James P. 
Landreth, Walter H. 
Landreth, Walter Herman 
Lawson, Everett R. 
Lewis, John H, 
Lich, Wilbur E. 
Long, James H. 
Lucas, Roy 



Privates : 

Magnus, Ralph N. 
McBride, Charles 
McCarty, Charlie H. 
McGmley, John J. 
McNabney, Clarence 
Moore, Elmer M. 
Moore, Thomas J. 
Nauglebaugh, Charles C. 
Nichols, Homer L. 
Norris, James T. 
O'Roark, Fred 
Pierson, Otis E. 
Plummer, Richard E. 
Puckett, George R. 
Rabinoviz, Samuel 
Redden, Calvin C. 
Reisberg, Louis 
Renner, William D. 
Riley, Jack 
Rose, Louis M. 
Rizzuta, Thomas, Jr. 
Ross, Joseph F. 
Sattinger, Mike 
Squires, Fred 
Schwartz, Abe 
See, James K. 
Shipley, Jesse 
Smith, Clarence S. 
Smith, John E. 
Smith, Raymond C. 
Spillman, Sam S. 
Stenger, Claude M. 
Streibeck, Forrest M. 
Stultz, Ralph 
Sallust, Walter 
Tanner, Guy F. 
Thomas, Albert G. 
Todd, Clifford 
Wall, Herman L. 
Webber, Julius H. 
Whaley, William C. 
Wheat, Horace D. 
White, David E. 
Wickliff, Marvil M. 
Williams, Zack 
Wilson, Harry F. 
Wilson, James C. 
Winsett, Albert 
Witham, Alfred H. 
Witham, Theodore 
Wright, Vail G. 
Van Arsdel, William C. 



21 



1ST LT. OSCAR D. DYER 
Commanding Battery 



1ST LT. VANCE P. BRAXTON 



2ND LT. JOHN S. MILLS 



Battery B, 139th Field Artillery 

On October 1st, 1917, C and D Companies of the 4th 
Indiana Infantry were consolidated and formed Battery 
B of the 139th Field Artillery. 

Our first work was the cleaning up of a parade and 
drill ground which was no easy task, as it was covered 
with stumps and logs, but after days of hard labor it 
was cleared and the "squads hump" instructions pro- 
ceeded. It was soon found that we were becoming 
efficient in the dismounted drill and the Regimental Com- 
mander decided to issue us rifles. A few incidentals like 
smashed toes and bumped heads followed, but we readily 
learned the manual of arms, but finding this not sufficient 
to keep us in trim, we were issued bayonets. Bayonet 
drill then followed. 

After weeks of strenuous training with the bayonet, 
the Regimental Commander decided that we were in con- 
dition to "go over the top," but owing to the fact that 
we were artillery, he found it necessary to send the non- 
coms to the old 4th Field Artillery for a month's school- 
ing. We can readily say that every man came back from 
school trained on the cannon, as well as being able to 
pick up the hind foot of a mule. The officers of the 
regiment also got a longer taste of the medicine the 
non-coms received. 

Next the battery was sent to the range, but not a 
rifle range as we all expected. It turned out to be the 
"smoke bomb" range, and instead of learning to fire a 
rifle or a cannon, we learned the art of digging trenches. 
After putting in many cold and hungry days digging 
trenches, we went back to camp and found it wasn't 
such a bad place after all. 



316 THE STORY OP THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

The army "snow'* began to get thick, and we were all 
"set" aflame with it^ because we thought we were going 
to France. Time dragged and with it our spirits fell as 
we remained for months in Camp Shelby, and we began 
to take our drills and work as a drudge instead of a 
pleasure. However, we were buoyed up with the idea 
of going to France a little later. 

The winter was cold, and we sat around the tent 
stove almost every night trying to keep warm. Christ- 
mas time came and we had a large dinner and every 
body was happy. Several of us received furlough, but 
after Christmas and New Year's passed the men became 
dissatisfied with conditions and the idea that they were 
not going to France caused some to go "A. W. O, L." 
This was stopped, however, as they put the offenders 
in the 63rd F. A. Brigade stockade as soon as they 
returned. 

Spring came, and we were all glad, but still, we 
seemed to be no nearer to France than we were in the 
fall. On February 26th we took down our tents and 
went to the rifle range and after a long hot hike, we 
arrived there about 1:30 that afternoon and pitched our 
tents. We did nothing the next day but straighten up 
camp. On Wednesday we went to the range and began 
firing. We fired on the range every day until March 20th. 
During that time we, the heavy artillery, had broken all 
records on the infantry range and established for our- 
selves a record which was never equalled in the Division. 

On March 20th we broke camp and hiked back to 
camp and were all glad to get back and were pleased 
at the record we had made. Gas masks were next issued. 
Training with gas masks began, which was a long and 
hard task, not mentioning the drill on the three inch 
guns and close order drill. 



BATTERY B 317 

May 6th came, and we broke camp and went to the 
combat range and there pitched camp, after which we 
got to work. The work at this range, like that at the 
"smoke bomb," was not firing, but digging trenches and 
the worst of it was we had to work at night because 
the machine gun range was so close that it was dangerous 
to work in the day time. We worked in the trenches night 
after night, buoyed up with the thought of going to 
France, but we were about to give up, when on the 
morning of May the 8th an order came to send about one 
third of the battery to France as replacement troops. 
Everybody was wild and all wanted to go. The non-coms 
tried to get "busted" to get to go, but finally a list was 
made and the men that were to go were picked out and 
sent back to camp where they were equipped for over- 
seas duty. On May 11th the battery came back to camp, 
but the men who were to remain in Camp Shelby were 
certainly downhearted. On May 29th the battery pre- 
pared for a five-day hike. We hiked about ten miles and 
pitched "pup tents." The next day we hiked to Purvis 
and from there to Lumberton, the distance being twenty- 
two miles and this was a Decoration Day long to be 
remembered by all the men of the battery. On the 
following day we remained at Lumberton and the next 
morning went to Brooklyn, which was twenty miles, and 
turned in. On the morning following we went back to 
camp, arriving there about eleven-thirty, covering about 
twelve miles and a half. Glad to get to camp does not 
adequately describe it. 

On June 4th the men picked for over seas left for 
France, all happy to know that soon they would be 
sending the Hun their compliments. The men left behind 
were as gloomy as the others were happy. 



318 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

A Detention Camp for the reception of the men called 
into service by the draft was established at Camp Shelby 
and several of the men from our battery were detailed 
there as instructors. Among them was Sergeant Clark, 
Corporal Cathers, ''Hard Luck" Powell, Private Gross- 
nickel, Private Pope and Private Dell. They worked 
hard, because they were promised a furlough at the 
Detention Camp after the men in the first draft had been 
disposed of, but instead of that they were ordered to 
stay until another campful had been disposed of. 

The battery was filled to war strength with men from 
the Detention Camp. They were good men, but had to 
be trained. The non-coms began their task, and in a 
few weeks the new men became very efficient and the 
old men's hopes were again aroused by the thoughts of 
going to France. This soon died away however. 

On July 31st the battery went to the rifle range where 
the new men fired, and they, like the old men, did good 
work. They did not succeed in breaking our established 
record however. We fired on the range until August 
2d, when the battery returned to camp. 

The new men were trained very rapidly and went to 
the artillery range almost every day where they fired 
and became efficient. They took great interest in their 
work and soon acquired the spirit of going to France, 
and the battery was again set aflame with the news 
that they were going to move. 

On September 19th, the battery left Camp Shelby and 
after a long journey, we arrived at Camp Upton, New 
York, on the evening of September 22d. At Camp Upton 
we were equipped for overseas duty, and October 6th 
we left Camp Upton for New York, on which day we 
boarded the **Cedric," a large British steamer. At five 



BATTERY B 319 

o'clock that evening we started on our voyage across the 
Atlantic and after eleven days we landed at Liverpool, 
England. All were glad to be on land once more, because 
most of them had been seasick, added to which was the 
British food, which we did not like, perhaps for the lack 
of seasoning. 

We boarded a train at Liverpool and went to Codford, 
Wiltshire, a rest camp in England, where we remained 
for several days, but the only thing we rested there was 
our stomachs. 

On October 21st we entrained and went to South- 
ampton, England, where we detrained and remained in 
a warehouse all day. That night we loaded on a trans- 
port and crossed to Cherbourg, France, the next morning. 
We debarked immediately and hiked to a British "rest 
camp," where we remained until the next day, when we 
hiked back to Cherbourg and entrained on "side door 
Pullmans" labeled "8 horses or 40 men." We rode in 
these box cars all that night, the next day, and until 
eleven-thirty the next night, when we detrained at Ploer- 
mel, France, and went to an old convent where we 
remained for several days. The convent was built about 
four hundred years ago and had much to do in the olden 
days historically. Our quarters at Ploermel were damp, 
due to constant drizzle and rain. Several of the men 
were sick, among them being Private Lester Jacobs, who 
was operated on for appendicitis. 

We left Ploermel on November 9th and went to Camp 
de Meucon. Getting to this place we rode half the way 
in trucks and hiked the rest of the way, arriving at 
camp that afternoon very tired but glad to be there. 
The next day we started our intensive training on the 
155mm howitzer and machine guns, the detail instru- 



320 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

merits and last but not least, the gas masks. We worked 
hard and advanced very rapidly, but before we had fin- 
ished our firing an order came to turn in our gas masks, 
which was a happy day. Next the guns were turned in 
and then the remainder of the materiel. 

We left Camp de Meucon November 30th and went 
on the narrow gauge to Vannes, where we entrained 
for Brest, arriving there on the first of December at 
4:45 in the evening. We hiked to Pontanezen Barracks 
where we remained for two weeks awaiting orders to 
leave for the United States. We were all in high spirits, 
despite the mud and water and waited eagerly for orders 
to move. December 13th President Wilson landed in 
Brest. We went there and formed part of his escort. 
After the President had passed we were told that we 
would go back to the United States on the battle-ships 
which had escorted the President's ship to Brest, but 
we did not go on these. 

On December 14th we received orders to move on the 
15th and everybody was happy indeed. We sailed from 
Brest on December 15th on the "George Washington" (an 
interned German liner), which was the ship the Pres- 
ident came over on. We left France that evening at five 
o'clock on our long voyage home. 

We landed at Hoboken, New Jersey, at pier number 
six, on the 23rd of December, and that is the day that 
will long be remembered by the members of the battery. 
We debarked and were greeted warmly by the people, 
the Salvation Army and Y. M. C. A. The Red Cross 
served hot coffee and buns — cigarettes and chocolate being 
served by the other organizations. We entrained there 
and went to Camp Merritt, a splendid camp, where we 
remained for two weeks. It was here that we received 



BATTERY B 321 

our "cootie treatment" or "sheep dip" as some of the 
boys called it. We received another new complete outfit 
of clothes. 

Our Christmas was a merry one, because we were 
never so happy and comfortable, never having fully 
realized what a great country we lived in. Our New Years 
Day was fully as en joy ably spent. 

On January 5th we left Camp Merritt for Fort Ben- 
jamin Harrison, Indiana. Here we remained, where we 
received that wonderful piece of paper — our discharge — 
but never will the ties of Battery B be forgotten 
("never"). 

ROSTER OF BATTERY B, 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Capt Ernst E. Chenoweth, transferred to Inspector's Department, 

Camp Pontanezen, France, Dec. 13, 1918, Butlerville, Ind. 
1st Lieut, Oscar 1). Dyer, Huntington, Ind. 
1st. Lieut, Vance P.Rraxton, Paoli, Ind. 
2d Lieut. John S. Mills, Jr., Englewood, N. J. 

2d Lieut, Reuben Briny, transferred S. O. S., Brest, France, Dec. 8, 1918. 
1st Sergt, Edwin G. Calhoun, North Manchester, Ind. ., 

Mess Sergt. Louis B. Davis, 701 South Illinois street, Indianapolis, Irid. 
Sup. SergiL John J. Mosman, La Fontaine, Ind. 

Sergt. Walter H. Landreth, 935 North Rural street, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Sergt. Russell Clark, R. R. No. 1, Laketon, Ind. 
Sergt. Allen M. Ball, 310 Colorado street, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Sergt. Perry L. Began, 1605 North Alabama street, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Sergt. Amor Goldberg, 615 Russell avenue, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Sergt, Glenn E. Harnisli, 1411 East State street, Huntington, Ind. 
Sergt, Oved E. Holmes, R. R. No. 8, Huntington, Ind. 
Sergt. Guy F. Tanner, Covington, Ind. 

Sergt, Fred Squires, 1144 West Thirtieth street, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Sergt. Leon J. Ribly, Laketon, Ind. 
Corp. Marion D. Broom, R. R. No. 5, Majenica, Ind. 
Corp. Dale Cathers, R. R. No. 19, Huntington, Ind. 
Corp. Glenn E. Deeds, 1071 Zahn street, Huntington, Ind. 
Corp. Herschell Griffith, P. O. Box 35, Van Buren, Ind. 
Corp. William J. Healy, 2318 North LaSalle street, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Corp. Burten Henry, 2725 South Main street, Anderson, Ind. 
Corp. Harley M. Houser, 261 East Hill street, Wabash, Ind. 
Corp. Robert H. Klein, 2346 North Davidson street, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Corp. Lee A. La Master, R. R. No. 24, Marysville, Ind. 
Corp. William F. Massing, 956 North Oxford street, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Corp. John J. McGinley, 337 North California street, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Corp. Harry Mavrogenis, Bicknell, Ind. 
Corp. Emmet S. Meese, Warren, Ind. 
(^orp. Victor A. Murphy, North Main street, Antwerp, Ohio. 



322 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Corp. William D. Benner, 314 Lincoln street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Corp. Harry W. Smith, 242 East Market street, Huntington, Ind. 

Corp. Raymond, C. Smith, Lizton, Ind. 

Corp. Forest M. Stribeck, 630 North Senate avenue, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Corp. Herman L. Wall, Brownsburg, Ind. 

Corp. John Warren, 108 East Pratt street, Indianapolis, Ind. • 

Corp. Charles H. Watson, Markle, Ind. 

Corp. Lawrence Zobrosky, R. R. No. 5, North Manchester, Ind. 

Mech. Eugene P. Buckingham, Huntington, Ind. 

Mech. Leon C. Buschman, Vevay, Ind. 

Mech. Harold L. Eisenberg, 113 East Market street, Huntington, Ind. 

Mech. Wilbur E. Lich, R. R. C, Box 326, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Mech. Robert V. Miller, Tiosa, Ind. 

Privates 1st Class and Privates : 
Abstein, Mayer, 319 North Fulton street, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Adams, Isaac C., 314 East Washington street, Huntington, Ind. 
Agnell, Roy D., 919 Front street, Huntington, Ind. 
Austin, Joseph Alcide, La Fourche Crossing, La. 
Atwood, Robert L., Pittafield, 111. 
Bailey, George, R. R. C, Box 377, Indianapolis, Ind 
Barnes, John, 724 Monroe street, Quincy, 111. 
Bass, Harold R., La Rose, 111. 

Bayles, James A., 954 Eldorado street, Decatur, 111. 
Bergauer, Germaine, 1202 London street, Huntington, Ind. 
Beyler, Fred R., Degolia, Pa. 

Bitner, Harley L«, 303 Whitelock street, Huntington, Ind. 
Blumer, John E., St. Jacob, 111. 
Bogh, George P., R. R. No. 7, Morrison, 111. 
Boyer, William H., R. R. No. 2, Roann, Ind. 
Broderick, Harold H., 1491 Grant street, Huntington, Ind. 
Bussche, Joseph, 2201 Third avenue, Rock Island, 111. 
•Caery, Samuel, Gilkerson P. 0., Jonesboro, Ark. 
Campion, Michael, 518 North Stone street, Decatur, 111. 
Cargill, Lloyd rI, 510 Thirty-fourth street. Fourth avenue. Box, 

Moline, 111. 
Carpenter, Harley C, R. R. No. 5, Warren, Ind. 
Cherry, Sidney L., 542 South Missouri street, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Coble, Alfred D., Servia, Ind. 

Cowgill, Ward S., R. R. No. 2, Box 19, Akron, Ind. 
Dell, Clifford F^ R. R. No. 5, Sheridan, Ind. 
Doherty, Thomas R,, R. R. No. 1, West McHenry, 111. 
Donnelly, Elmer V., 445 Bright street, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Elmholt, Erling L., 7939 Evans street, Chicago, 111. 
Epperson, John, 8231^ Fourteen One-half street, Rock Island, 111. 
Ernst-, Robert L., Freemont street, Caladonia, Wis. 
Fahrnow, Herbert D., Geeman street, Huntington, Ind. 
Fischer, Otto F., 2224 South Ridgeway avenue, Chicago, 111. 
Foote, Emil, 625 Oak street, Woodstock, 111. 
Forber, Raymond C 2933 Eleventh avenue, Moline, 111. 
Fllsk, Martin L., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Forst, Sherman W., R. R. No. 9, Huntington, Ind. 
Fritzke, Albert F., 401 Fifteenth avenue. East Moline, 111. 
Green, Clarence, 555 East Adams street, Franklin, Ind. 
Groniger, Arthur L., Roann P. O., R. R. No. 2, Laketon, Ind. 
Grossnickel, Glen H., R. R. No. 6, Manchester, Ind. 
Groves, Amet, Waynetown, Ind. 

Gnetheler, Mathias G., 904 North La Fontaine street, Huntington. 
Indiana. 



BATTERY B 823 

Privates 1st Class and Priyates : 
Guntle, Everett IL, R. R. No. 9, Huntington, Ind. 
Haneline, Raymond, 951 Harris street, Huntington, Ind. 
Harris, Claude E^ R. R. No. 1, Almyra, Ark. 
Holmes Albert S^ R. R. No. 8, Huntington, Ind. 
Hoppe, Fred H^ 2310 Brown street, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Honser, Fred C^ 261 East Hill street, Wabash, Ind. 
Hnffman, James M^ Henning, 111. 

Huyveart, Cecil F^ 717 Seventeenth avenue. East Moline, 111. . 
Jacobs, Lester, R. R. No. 7, Greenfield, Ind. 
Johnson, Ferd M^ 919 Elm street, Huntington Ind. 
Jones Bruce, R. R. No. 2, Wabash, Ind. 
Jones, James, 517 North Vine street, Taylorsville, 111. 
Jure>icz, Joseph, 2251 West Twenty-third Place, Chicago, 111. 
Kacirek, Joseph, 4122 West Twenty-first Place, Chicago, 111. 
Kahn, Joseph, 26 Oak street, Cambridge, Mass. 
Kase, Harold, 601 German street, Huntington, Ind. 
Keine Fred C^ 314 Maine street, Aurora, 111. 
Kelley, Edward, Brookline avenue, Boston, Mass. 
Kelly, Thomas H^ 329 North Sixteenth street, Richmond, Ind. 
Kerr, William E^ 115 South Davidson street, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Kesler, Paul R^ R. R. No. C, Danville, Ind. 
Kimbell, John H^ 817 North Broadway street, Havana, 111. 
Knecht, Thomas F^ 521 North La Fontaine street, Huntington, Ind. 
Knope, Roy T^ 709 South Winnebago street, Rockford, 111. 
Kokoska, Albert, 2122 Eighteenth Place, Chicago, 111. 
Kopacki, John, 1821 West Twenty-first street, Chicago, 111. 
Kracke, Walter H^ 1640 North Irving avenue, Chicago, 111. 
Kretachmer, Herman, 189 West Fifteenth street, Chicago, 111. 
Kusinski, Walter J., 2345 West Twentieth street. Chicago, 111. 
Larsen, Aage M^ 507 Ryerson avenue, Elgin, 111. 
Larsen, Gordon I)^ 312 Short street, Woodstock, 111. 
Lemon, Sloane, P. O. Box 54, Shabbona, 111. 
Lichnerowicz, 8732 Exchange avenue, South Chicago, 111. 
Lownian, Shirley R., 44 Vine street, Huntington, Ind. 
Mallory, Elmer G^ 507 West Fifth street, Connersville, Ind. 
>rartin, Charley, P. O. Box 238, Warren, Ind. 
Massey, William D., 4017 West Monroe street, Chicago, 111. 
McCormick, John L„ Frankfort, Tenn. 
M^cCoy, William D^ R. R. No. 1, New Cumberland, Pa. 
]W:cGath, Arthur, R. R. A, Wabash, Ind. 
Moore Elmer M^ 191 West King street, Franklin, Ind. 
Medley, William C^ 1021 Bond avenue. East St. Louis, 111. 
Melin, Frans 0^ 1628 Sixteenth avenue, Moline, 111. 
3rews, Louis, 143 Shawnee street, Freeport, 111. 
Miller, Herschel C, 1170 Front street, Huntington, Ind. 
Miller, Odes, corner Third and Frank streets, Mitchell, Ind. 
Minton, Ralph W., R. R. No. 6, Huntington, Ind. 
Mitchell, Brennan A., 1404 South Crockett street, Sherman, Tex. 
Morris, John F^ Roundtop, Ark. 

Murphy, Victor A^ North Main street, Antwerp, Ohio. 
Xelson, Victor A^ 1844 Nineteenth avenue, Moline, 111. 
Overholser, Donald W^ 608 North Walnut street, North Manchester, 

Indiana. 
Pauwells, Medard, 623 North Fourth avenue, Moline, 111. 
Parker, Paul M,, 1361 Harris street, Huntington, Ind. 
Fluff, Henry A., R. R. No. 1, East St. Louis, 111. 
Plummer, Richard E^ 602 East Miami street, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Poe, Paul E„ R. R. No. 2, Largo, Ind. 



824 THE STORY OF THE i39tH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Pope, Ernest, Temple, Ind. 
Powell, Floyd W^ Akron, Ind. 

Raymer, Ralph V^ 549 George street, Huntington, Ind. 
Reeves, Walter H^ Griggsville, 111. 
Reddin, Calvin C^ Bemis, Tenn. 
Rhodes, Hulon, Raleigh, Miss. 
Riedel, William L^ Smithton, 111. 
Rin^, Edmund L^ Stillman Valley, 111. 
Robbing, Willie V^ R. R. No. 2, Warren, Ark. 
Robinson, Walter J^ 939 West Van Buren street, Chicago, 111. 
Rogiers, August J^ 1630 Fourteenth street, Moline, 111. 
Sallust, Walter, R. R. No. 2, Fillmore, Ind. 
Sands, Leo M., R. R. No. 2, Markle, Ind. 
Santif Jos. C, 2711 Twentieth street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Sargent, Bert K., P. O. Box 118, Abrams, Wis. 
Schwartz, Abe, Grand Hotel, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Shager, Charles E., Sharon, Wis. 
Sharp, Lee, La Fontaine, Ind. 
Sherrill, Paul E., 1802 First avenue, Silvus, 111. 
Shomshak, Louis L., 263 Concord street, St. Paul, Minn. 
Simon, Frank, 4401 Wentworth avenue, Chicago, 111. 
Slusser, John L., 940 Lexington avenue, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Smith, Ross I., 424 Hasty street, Huntington, Ind. 
South, Lloyd W., Van Orin, 111. 

Stephens, Raymond, L., 208 High street, Huntington, Ind. 
Stern, Otto H., 1413 East Grand avenue, Decatur 111. 
Sunderman, Harry J., 548 Buchanan street, Huntington, Ind. 
Sutton, Floyd H., R. R. No. 1, Warren, Ind. 
Talbot George W., R. R. No. 2, Freeburg, 111. 
Thornton, Alpheus, 816 South Third street, Monmouth, 111. 
Thorne, Benjamin, R. R. No. 1, Warren, Ind. 
Tobias Glenn, R. R. No. 2, Huntington, Ind. 
Truebger, James H., Galconda, 111. 
Udzela, John C, Granville, 111. 

Virden, Russell, 300 North Twenty-fifth street, Lafayette, Ind. 
Wabel, Gerald C, Putnam, 111. 

Walters, Forrest E., 1120 North Sixth street, Lafayette, Ind. 
Warren, Louis, Berry, 111. 
Watts, Beauferd F., R. R. A, Wabash, Ind. 
Webber, Julius D., Lakeside, Ohio. 
Wheat, Horace D., Lizton, Ind. 

Wmiams, Galen C, 503 West Third street, North Manchester ,Ind. 
Willis, Estill, Ravenna, Ky. 
Wilson, Virgil P., R. R. No. 1, Middletwn, Ind. 
Witham, Theodore, 323 Hanson avenue, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Wold, David C, R. R. Box 6, Polo, 111. 
Privates 
Albright, Ulysses, enlisted Aug. 5, 1918; residence. Lost Creek, Tenn. 
Anderson, Thomas P., enlisted Aug. 5, 1918; residence, Marysville. 

Tenn. 
Austin, John R^ enlisted Aug. 4, 1918; residence, Lead Hill, Ark. 
Bacon, Carroll R^, enlisted April 27, 1917; residence, Decatur, Ind. 
Beck, Peter W., enlisted June 15,* 1918; residence, Tyler, Minn. 
Bennetti, John, enlisted May 25, 1918; residence, Staunton, 111. 
Brake, Lonnle, enlisted Aug. 8, 1918; residence. East National, Tenn. 
Brown, Charlie R^ enlisted Aug. 7, 1918; residence, Lenoir City, Tenn. 
Clower, Joseph, enlisted May 25, 1918; residence, Jackson, Miss. 
Comutt, James 0., enlisted Aug. 8, 1918 ; residence Huntersville, Ala. ; 
Doty, Talmadge, T., enlisted May 25, 1918; residence, McCool, Miss. 



BATTERY B 325 

Eisner, Edward S^ enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, 9210 South Ash- 
land street, Chicago, 111. 

Ericksoii, Charles S^ enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, 218 South 
Prospect street, Rockford, 111. 

Farrow, Clarence, enlisted Aug. 8, 1918; residence, Ripley, Miss. 

Ferris, Robert A^ enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Mi. Carroll, 111. 

Fitzgerald, Thomas, enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, 3816 South 
Washtenaw avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Eraser, William, enlisted June 22, 1918; residence, 304 Fox street, 
Aurora, 111. 

Frazier, Joseph, enlisted June 13, 1918; residence, 3808 Pine Grove 
avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Fryback, Charles F^ enlisted July 25, 1917 ; residence, Bluffton, Ind. 

Gardner, Hugh, enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, 5915 South Throop 
street, Chicago, 111. 

Ginther, Charles, enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Mt. Carroll, 111. 

Ginty, James F^ enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, 121 North Fran- 
cisco street Chicago 111. 

Golin, Charles, enlisted' June 14, 1918; residence, 504 North Parkside 
street, Chicago, 111. 

Green, James A^ enlisted Aug. 4, 1918 ; residence, Johnson City, Tenn. 

Greene, Irving B^ enlisted July 1, 1918 ; residence, 437 Tilson avenue, 
Rockford, 111. 

Gronke, Otto A^ enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, 2737 Hendorn 
street, Chicago, 111. 

Gnlbransen, Albert, enlisted June 13, 1918; residence, 12139 Wallace 
street, Chicago, 111. 

Hansen, Arthur, enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, 1631 North Oakley 
avenue, Chicago, III. 

Hansen, William, enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, 5466 Thomas 
street, Chicago, 111. 

Harrington, John J., enlisted June 13, 1918; residence, 5221 Van 
Buren street, Chicago, 111, 

Hassels, Andrew J^ enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, 1310 North 
Menord avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Heisler, Joseph, enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, 1338 West Thirty- 
first Place, Chicago, 111. 

Henning, Arthur, enlisted June 14, 1918 ; residence, 500 Spring street, 
Galena, 111. 

Hllliard, Albert, enlisted Aug. 6, 1918; residence,* 9227 West Mathew 
avenue, Jonesboro, Ark. 

Hoffman, Herman, enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, 2352 Blooming- 
dale avenue, Chicago, 111. 

ftegami, Joe I,, enlisted June 13, 1918; residence, 11112 Langley 
avenue, Pulman, Chicago, 111. 

Jackson, Hugh M,, enlisted June 21, 1918; residence, Modale, la. 

Jenzen, Henry, enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, 2736 South Port 
avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Jessup, Clifford, enlisted Aug. 5, 1918; residence, Hollis, Ark. 

Johnsen, Harry, enlisted June 13, 1918; residence, Galesburg, 111. 

Johnson, Walter, enlisted June 13, 1918; residence. 7648 South 
Peoria street, Chicago, 111. 

Jones, Mort C, enlisted Aug. 5, 1918; residence, Stevens, Ark. 

Josefson^ Harry F„ enlisted June 29, 1918; residence, Galesburg, 111. 

Kelley, Henry J., enlisted Aug. 9, 1918; residence. Meridian, Miss. 

Kelly, Nimrod, enlisted May 15, 1918; residence, Fern Spring, Miss. 

Enowles, John F,, enlisted June 13, 1918; residence, 5242 West Mon- 
roe street, Chicago, 111. 

Konecny, Andrew J,, enlisted July 5, 1918; residence, Stuttgart, Ark. 



326 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Kranss, William, enlisted May 15, 1918; residence, New Athens, 111. 
Kuball, William A^ enlisted April 5, 1918. 

Lewis, Samuel, enlisted Aug. 5, 1918; residence, Blansett, Ark . 
Macheel, Arthur C, enlisted Aug. 5, 1918; residence, Fox Lake, Wis. 
Moore, Tirgil W^ enlisted June 25, 1918; residence, 501 West B street, 

Wellston, Ohio. 
Xash, Fred, enlisted Feb. 22, 1918; residence, Sugarland, Tex. 
Park, Grady, enlisted April 18. 1917; residence, Springfield, Mo. 
Parker, Mason A^ enlisted Aug. 8, 1918; residence, Brewton, Ala. 
Pindell, Charles K,, enlisted July 27, 1917; residence. Laurel, Ind. 
Piscattelli, Dominic F^ enlisted Jan. 2, 1918; residence, 117 Pleasant 

street, Watertown, Mass. 
Powers, Clem J^ enlisted Aug. 5, 1918; residence, McCallister, Okla. 
Roberts, William O^ enlisted May 25, 1918; residence, Cruger, Miss. 
Rose, Terrell D., enlisted May 24, 1918; residence, Europa, Miss. 
Ross, Stephen T., enlisted May 25, 1918; residence, Mozell, Miss. 
Sanders, Thomas J., enlisted May 26, 1918; residence, McNair, Miss. 
Scherf, Sabin, C, enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Withee, Wis. 
Schmidt, John W., enlisted Aug. 6, 1918; residence, Trafalgar, Ark. 
Sheffield, Harold J., enlisted Nov. 15, 1917; residence, Swain, N. Y. 
Shelton, Hannibal, enlisted May 26, 1918 ; residence, Toomscula, Miss. 
Simms, Leonard, enlisted June 19, 1918; residence, South Wilming- 
ton, 111. 
Spillcke, Leo H,, enlisted June 15, 1918; residence, Roberts, Wis. 
Standard, Ed, enlisted June 25, 1918 ; residence. Holly Ridge, Miss. 
Stein, Edward, enlisted May 25, 1918; residence, Belleville, 111. 
Stevens, Huey, enlisted Aug. 5, 1918; residence, Greenwood, Ark. 
Strahan, Joseph T., enlisted May 14, 1918; residence, Lumberton, 

Miss. 
Sunney, James D., enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Patch Grove, 

Wis. 
Venard, Edward F,, enlisted June 13, 1918; residence, 5233 West 

Adams street, Chicago, 111. 
Waller, Roy, enlisted Aug. 5, 1918; residence, Judsnia. Ark. 
Waltman, William, enlisted Aug. 9, 1918; residence, Soso, Miss. 
Whitton, Frank P., enlisted May 19, 1917; residence, 23b West Second 

street, Rushville, Ind. 
Wise, John F,, enlisted Aug. 5. 1918; residence, Pangburn, Ark. 



Company E, 4th Indiana Infantry 

Company E, 4th Indiana Infantr>% of Marion, Indiana, 
became a part of the Indiana National Guard June 1st, 
1917. Glen Ridgway had the distinction of being the 
first to enlist. The Civic Hall of Marion was designated 
as an armory and preliminary drills began at once. 

From June 1st to August 5th, or date of call into 
Federal service, drills were conducted three nights pei^ 
week in the armory. The companj^ was rapidly recruited 
toward war strength and on August 5th, 145 men entered 
into Federal service. 

The company went into camp at Camp Crampton, 
National Military Home, Marion, Indiana, August 5th, 1917, 
remaining there until September 5th, 1917. While sta- 
tioned at Camp Crampton eight recruits were added to 
the company roster and six men were discharged on account 
of physical disability. On August 19th, nine men were 
transferred to the 1st Regiment Indiana Field Artillery. 
Excellent treatment was accorded the men by the members 
and staff of the National Military Home. 

September 4th orders were received for Company E 
to proceed to Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana, to join 
the regiment and the following day farewells were made 
Marion and National Military Home. The regiment 
remained at Fort Harrison until September 25th, while 
clothing and other equipment was being drawn. The 
schedule here consisted of hikes, close order drill and 
field maneuvers. On Saturdays, September 16th and 
23rd, leaves were granted to 50% of the organization for 
purpose of visiting their homes. On September 25th the 
company entrained with the remainder of the regiment 
for Camp Shelby, Mississippi, arriving at that station 



328 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

September 27th, 1917. The company remained a part of 
■an infantry regiment only a few days when the 4th 
Indiana Infantry was converted into the 139th U. S. 
Field Artillery and E and F Companies became Battery 
C of the new organization. 

The following is a roster of Company E, 4th Indiana 
Infantry, from date of muster into State service until 
arrival at Camp Shelby, Mississippi. 

ROSTEK OF COMPANY E, 4TH INDIAJI^A INFANTRY. 

The following is a Roster of Company E, 4th Indiana Infantry, 
from date of muster into State Service until arrival at Camp Shelby, 
Mississippi. 
Capt. Harry R, Hall, commissioned June 16, 1917; residence, Marion, 

Ind.; assigned as Capt. Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 80, 1917. 
1st Lient. Ross E. Watson, commissioned June 16, 1917; residence, 

Marion, Ind.; assigned as 1st Lieut. Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
2d Lieut. Terlln C. Goss, commissioned June 16, 1917; residence, 

Marion, Ind.; assigned as 2d Lieut. Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
1st Ser^ Ancil-Cook, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

appointed Sergt. Aug. 15, 1917; appointed 1st Sergt. Sept. 1, 1917; 

trans, as 1st Sergt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Sup. Ser^ E. S. Hulgan, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, 

Ind.; appointed Sergt. Aug. 15, 1917; appointed Sup. Sergt. Sept. 

1, 1917; trans, as Sup. Sergt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Mess Ser^ Neill Stuart, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

appointed Sergt. Aug. 15, 1917; appointed Mess Sergt. Sept. 1, 

1917; trans, as Mess Sergt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Sergt. Harold W. Steele, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

appointed Sergt. Aug. 15, 1917; trans, as Sergt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. 

Sept. 30, 1917. 
Sergt. Grover L. Goebel, enlisted June 27, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

appointed Sergt. Aug. 15, 1917; discharged Aug. 18, 1917; re- 
instated Aug. 20, 1917, warrant as Sergt. continued; trans, as 

Sergt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Sergt. Clyde B. Stodghill, enlisted June 6, 1917; residence, Marion, 

Ind.; appointed Sergt. Aug. 15, 1917; trans, as Sergt. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Sergt. William H. Reynolds, enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Marion. 

Ind.; appointed Sergt. Aug. 15, 1917; trans, as Sergt. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Sergt. Guy F. Hummel, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion. Ind.; 

appointed Sergt. Aug. 15, 1917; trans, as Sergt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. 

Sept. 30, 1917. 
Sergt. Edward F. Minch, enlisted June 1, 1917 ; residence, Marion, Ind. ; 

appointed Sergt. Aug. 15, 1917; trans, as Sergt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. 

Sept. 30, 1917. 
Sergt. Floyd E. Lindley, enlisted June 6, 1917 ; residence, Marion, Ind. ; 

appointed Corp. Aug. 15, 1917; appointed Sergt. Sept. 3, 1917; trans. 

as Sergt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 



BATTERY C = Y : 329 

Corp. Paul R. Leapley, enlisted June 6, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. Aug. 15, 1917; trans, as Corp. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. 

Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. George M. Shedron, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, 

Ind.; appointed Corp. Aug. 15, 1917; trans, as Corp. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Glen Ridgway, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Wabash, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. Aug. 15, 1917; trans, as Corp. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. 

Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Elmer E. >yinn, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. Aug. 15, 1917; trans, as Corp. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. 

Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. TVilliam F. Stihvell, enlisted July 13, 1917; residence, Converse, 

Ind.; appointed Corp. Aug. 15, 1917; trans, as Corp. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Burr Stephens, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Fairmount, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. Aug. 15, 1917; trans, as Corp. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. 

Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Kearney K. Kline, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917 ; residence, Upland, Ind. ; 

appointed Corp. Aug. 15, 1917; trans, as Corp. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. 

Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Max W. Bowen, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence. Upland, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. Aug. 15, 1917; trans, as Corp. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. 

Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Carl D. McConnell, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

appointf^d Corp. Aug. 15, 1917; trans, as Corp. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. 

Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Owen Starrett, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. Aug. 15, 1917; trans, as Corp. to Bai. C, 139 F. A. 

Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Russell H. Davis, enlisted June 1, 1917; resid*^nce, Marion, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. Aug. 15, 1917; trans, as Corp. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. 

Sopt. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Louis C. Short, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. Aug. 15, 1917; trans, as Corp. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. 

Sept. 30. 1917. 
Corp. Cecil R, Hunter, enlisted July 13, 1917; residence, Converse, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. Aug. 15, 1917; attached to Bat. C, 139 F. A. as 

Corp. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Bugler Lionel D. Maple, enlisted July 13, 1917; residence. Converse, 

Ind.; appointed Bugler Sept. 1, 1917; trans, as Bugler to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Bugler Karl M. Dillon, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

appointed Bugler Sept. 1, 1917; trans, as Bugler to Bat. C, 139 

F. A. September, 30, 1917. 
Cook Edd L. Feighner, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Niles, Mich.; 

appointed 'Cook Sept. 1, 1917; trans, as Cook to Bat. C, 139 F. A. 

Sept. 30, 1917. 
Cook Walter M. Lillard. enlisted June 26, 1917; residence. Marion, Ind.; 

appointed Cook Sept. 1, 1917; trans, ah Cook to Bat. C, 139 F. A. 

Sept. 30, 1917. 

Privates, 1st Class 

Rook, Clarence C, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence. Marion, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 1, 1917; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. C, 139 

F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Davis, Mahlon 0., enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sent. 1, 1917; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 

22 



330 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Baker, Eber J^ enlisted July 24, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 1, 1917; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Mercer, Howard, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Sims, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 1, 1917; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Stinson, Worthington W., enlisted July 27, 1917; residence, Marion, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 1, 1917; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. 

C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 

Prfrates 
Alexander, Cecil L^ enlisted July 21, 1917; residence, Converse, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Ballard, Wesley, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Ballinger, Ralph W^ enlisted Aug. 10, 1917; residence. Upland, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Barker, John W^ enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Bartholomew, Thomas E^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Bash, Rnssell, enlisted July 17, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, to 1st Regt. Ind. F. A. Aug. 19, 1917. 
Bay, :^amen E^ enlisted July 10, 1917; residence. Gas City, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. E, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Behers, Frank A^ enlisted Aug. 10, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Biggs, Chester S., enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Blackburn, Hershel E^ enlisted Aug. 18, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. E, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Blanco, Leandro, enlisted July 17, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Brown, Clem, enlisted July 13, 1917; residence. Converse, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Brown, Mark E^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. E, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Bryant, Basil E^ enlisted July 16, 1917; residence, Converse, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Carey, James G^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Carpenter, Francis D^ enlisted June 1, 1917 ; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to 1st Regt. Ind. F. A. Aug. 19, 1917. 
Collins, Roy H^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Summittville, Ind. 

trans, as Corp. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Cockran, Raymond E^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to 1st Regt. Ind. F. A. Aug. 19, 1917. 
Coombs, William, enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Marion. Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to 1st Regt. Ind. F. A. Aug. 19, 1917. 
Com, George, C,, enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Marion. Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30. 1917. 
Cox, Raymond, enlisted June 18, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; trans 

as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30. 1917. 
Cox, Walter H^ enlisted July 30, 1917; residence, Marion. Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Craig, Lawrence, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion. Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. E, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Creyiston, Rnssell G^ enlisted June 6, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

furloughed to 2d R. O. T. C. 



BATTERY C 331 

Privates 
Ciinniii^hain, Tniliam J^ enlisted July 13, 1917; residence. Converse, 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Danprerfield, Delton, enlisted July 9, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Desper, Georjre C, enlisted Aug. 20, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Detamore, Tolney 0^ enlisted July 17, 1917; residence, Converse, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Dicken, Waldo, enlisted July 25, 1917 ; residence, Marion, Ind. ; trans 

as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Dimirk, Marion, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Drook, Paul, enlisted July 13, 1917; residence, Converse, Ind.; trans 

as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Dnnckman, Thomas ^Y^ enlisted Sept. 6, 1917; residence, Marion 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. E, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Ellswori;h, Walter, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Erwin, Carl G^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; trans 

as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Evans, Clell B^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; trans 

as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Fer^son, Earl A^ enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Fischer, William A., enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Fltzsimmons, Edward, enlisted July 16, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Fnmish, Ray 0., enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Gar^s, Christos K^ enlisted July 28, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Gillmore, Walter H., enlisted July 27, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Graham, John E^ enlisted July 16, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Gray, William D^ enlisted July 30, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Gnnn, Charles C^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Van Buren, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Barter, Clifton W^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. E, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Hatfield, Beaty F., enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Hatfield, James L^ enlisted July 13, 1917; residence, Converse, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Haynes, Ira, enlisted July 13, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; trans 

as Pvt. to Bat. E, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Heckhard, Ernest R., enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to 1st Regt. Ind. F. A. Aug. 19, 1917. 
Holliday, Lawrence, A^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion 

Ind.; discharged Sept. 4, 1917. 
Hicks, Alvin, enlisted Aug. 10, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; trans 

as Pvt. to Sup. Co. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Hopper, Rohert H^ enlisted July 12, 1917; residence, Peru, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Hosier, Thomas R^ enlisted July 26, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 



332 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Priyates 

Howe, Samuel, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Grant County, Ind. ; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Huber, William, enlisted June 30, 1917; residence, Portland, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Hnffaker, Chester B^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Donahue, Ky.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Irwin, Orange V., enlisted July 13, 1917; residence, Converse, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Jones, Harry, enlisted Aug. 20, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; trans. 

as Pvt. to Bat. E, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Kcm, Howard R,, enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Knieb, Valentine F^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Enox, Gerald L., enlisted July 13, 1917; residence. Converse, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Lawson, Lawrence, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence. Grant County, 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Leitch, John T^ enlisted July 31, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Lostutter, John C^ enlisted Aug. 10, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Lewis, Lawrence, enlisted June 29, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Loftus, Oscar, enlisted Aug. 10, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to 1st Regt. Ind. F. A. Aug. 19, 1917. 
Love, Walter J., enlisted July 18, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Lucas, Leo, enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; trans. 

as Pvt. to Bat. E, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
McGruire, Walter W., enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

discharged as Pvt. Aug. 19, 1917. 
Manahan, Roy L^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Marks, Andrew J., enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Marks, Harry L^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Martin, Clfford A^ enlisted July 20, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Martz, George E., enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Mast, Clarence J^ enlisted July 13, 1917; residence, Converse, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Moore, Jesse, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence. Fox Station, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Nelson, Phillip, enlisted June 20, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Newton, Fred L., enlisted Aug. 3, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Nicholson, Dale, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Pairmount, Ind.: 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Norton, Albert J^ enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence Marion, Ind.; trans. 

as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Pallnm, Noah W,, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Van Buren, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Parson, Clayton B^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917 



BATTERY C 333 



PriYates 
Parsons, Thomas, enlisted July 6, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Pence, Lewis D^ enlisted July 13, 1917; residence, Converse, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Penrod, Paul J^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Van Buren, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Pitts, Carl L^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; trans. 

as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Qnesinberry Averette D,, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917 ; residence, Claudeville, 

Va.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Renick, Samuel T^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to 1st Regt, Ind. F. A. Aug. 19, 1917. 
Rennaker, Elzie M^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Replogle, James >V^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Reynolds, James R^ enlisted July 21, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Rudolph, Carlyle S., enlisted Sept. 6, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Russell, Ben F^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Shelton, Wilbur, C, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C. 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Shinn, Harry D^ enlisted July 13, 1917; residence. Converse, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Smith, Ora G^ enlisted July 7, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; trans. 

as Pvt. to 1st Regt. Ind. F. A. Aug. 19, 1917. 
Sims, Charles L^ enlisted July 27, 1917; residence, Gas City, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Spahr, Leo J^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; trans. 

as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Stone, Frederick M^ enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Portland, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Summers, Carl S^ enlisted July 17, 1917; residence. Converse, Ind.; 

discharged Sept. 29, 1917. 
Suit, Paul ^Y^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; trans. 

as Pvt. to Bat. E, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Swisher, Chester P^ enlisted Aug. 10, 1917; residence, Jonesboro. 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Tippett, Joseph >V^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Thomas, Eli E^ enlisted July 23, 1917; residence. Gas City, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Thompson, Charles E^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

discharged Aug. 19, 1917. 
Thompson, Glen, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; dis- 
charged Aug. 19, 1917. 
Thompson, Walter H^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to 1st Regt. Ind. F. A. Aug. 19, 1917. 
Ton^et, Louie, enlisted July 25, 1917; residence, Marion. Ind.; 

discharged Aug. 19, 1917. 
Trostel, Vaughn, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30. 1917. 
Vlckrey, Norman, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Wallace, Ira V^ enlisted July 18, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 



334 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Privates 

Walling, Joseph, enlisted July 13, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

discharged Aug. 19, 1917. 
Whlteman, Ira M^ enlisted July 12, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
TVillbrook, Con, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; dis- 
charged Aug. 19, 1917. 
Wlldoner, Forrest E., enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Wilson, William A^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Winger, Lawrence J^ enlisted June 1, 1917 ; residence, Marion, Ind. ; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Wintz, Albert, enlisted July 13, 1917; residence. Converse, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Teager, Oscar J^ enlisted Aug. 10, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 



Company F, 4th Indiana Infantry 

May 23d, 1917, saw the formation at Bedford, Indiana, 
of Company F, 4th Indiana Infantry. From that date 
until August 5th, 1917, date of muster into Federal 
service, the company continued to be recruited to war 
strength. William Ingalls and Leslie C. Pitts were 
commissioned lieutenants and took direct charge of the 
recruiting. The hall over Short's old livery was secured 
for an armory and there drill was held three times a 
week until Federal muster. 

Things went well and when Captain Coston came the 
early part of July from Indianapolis, to take charge of 
the company, it was well up toward war strength and 
fairly well drilled. 

Sunday morning, August 5th, 1917, 116 men stood 
muster and the company was then marched to church 
where fitting services were held. From August 5th to 
September 5th the company was stationed at Bedford 
and the time was taken up in close order drill and hikes. 
Some eight or ten more recruits were taken into the 
company during this period. The best of treatment was 
accorded the company while at home and the month was 
not long in passing. 

September 4th, 1917, orders were received to proceed 
to Fort Benjamin Harrison without delay and the com- 
pany left on special cars the night of September 5th. 
Here the regiment was formed and remained until Sep- 
tember 25th, while clothing and other Quartermaster 
equipment was being issued. Close order drill, road 
hikes and field maneuvers were on the schedule. Sep- 
tember 25th the company entrained with the remainder 
of the regiment for Camp Shelby, Mississippi, arriving 



336 THE STORY OP THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

the morning of September 27th, 1917. On October 1st, 
F Company arid E Company of t^e 4th Indiana Infantry 
were joined to form Battery C of the 139th U. S. Field 
Artillerj^ 

The following is the company roster from date of mus- 
ter into State service until arrival at Camp Shelby, 
Mississippi : 

ROSTER OF COMPANY F, 4TH IlfDIAlNA INFANTRY 

Capt. Toney Costan, commissioned July 1, 1917; residence, Bedford, 

Ind.; assigned as Adjt. to 2d Battalion, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
1st Lieut. William In^alls, commissioned June 1, 1917; residence, 

Bedford, Ind.; assigned as 1st Lieut. Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
2d Lieut. Leslie C. Pitts, commissioned June 1, 1917; residence, Bedford, 

Ind.; assigned as 2d Lieut. Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Ist Ser^. Harry C. Quackenbusli, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, 

Bedford, Ind.; appointed Sergt. Aug. 5, 1917; appointed 1st Sergt. 

Aug. 5, 1917; grade hcanged from 1st Sergt. to Sergt. and trans. 

as Sergt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Sup. Ser^t. Elbert H. Bartlett, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, 

Bedford, Ind.; appointed Sergt. Aug. 5, 1917; appointed Sup. Sergt. 

Aug. 5, 1917; grade changed from Sup. Sergt. to Sergt. and trans. 

as Sergt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Mess Sergt. Arthur J. Hauiigs, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bed- 
ford, Ind.; appointed Sergt. Aug. 5, 1917; appointed Mess Sergt. 

Aug. 5, 1917; grade changed from Mess Sergt. to Cook and trans. 

as Cook to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Sergt. David Keed, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Sergt. Aug. 5, 1917 ; trans, as Sergt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. 

Sept. 30, 1917. 
Sergt. Tirey Voorhies, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Sergt. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Sergt. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 

Sept. 30, 1917. 
Sergt Albert Durrenberger, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, 

Ind.; appointed Sergt. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Sergt. to Sup. Co. 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Sergt. Glen C. Frank, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Sergt. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Sergt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. 

Sept. 30, 1917. 
Sergt. Wendall Wallheiser, enlisted July 3, 1917; residence, Bedford, 

Ind.; appointed Sergt. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Sergt. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Sergt. Robert 0. Marlin, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, 

Ind.; appointed Sergt. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Sergt. to Bat. C. 

139 F. A. Sept. 30. 1917. 
Corp. Patrick V. Torphy, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, 

Ind.; appointed Corp. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Corp. to Bat. C, 139 

F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Raymond E. Sherwood, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence Cass- 

ville. Mo.; appointed Corp. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Corp. to Bat. C. 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 



BATTERY C 337 

Corp. Ealph L. Wible, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Corp, to Bat. C, 139 F. A. 

Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Fred F. Carter, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Corp. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. 

Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Charles E. Johnson, enlisted June 7, 1917; residence, Bedford. 

Ind.; appointed Corp. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Corp. to Bat. C, 139 

F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Charles E. Shoulty, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, 

Ind.; appointed Corp. Aug. 5, 1917; discharged as Corp. Aug. 20th. 

1917. 
Corp. Clyde IV. Smith, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Mitchell, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. Aug. 5, 1917; furloughed to 2nd R. O. T. C. Aug. 27. 
•1917. 
Corp. Louis Ingalls, enlisted July 3, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Corp. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. 

Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Howard L. Keach, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, 

Ind.; appointed Corp. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Corp. to Bat. C, 139 

F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Joe M. Owens, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. Sept. 1, 1917; trans, as Corp. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. 

Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Ermal Phillips, enlisted July 16, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. Sept. 1, 1917; trans, as Corp. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. 

Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Dewey T. Gresham, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford. 

Ind.; appointed Corp. Sept. 1, 1917; trans, as Corp. to Bat. C, 139 

F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Bngler John W. Carmichael, enlisted June 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, 

Ind.; appointed Bugler Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Bugler to Bat. C, 139 

F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Cook Preston Beal, enlisted July 3, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Cook Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Cook to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. 

Sept. 30, 1917. 
Cook Walter R, Hunter, enlisted Aug. 27, 1917; residence, Bedford, 

Ind.; appointed Cook Sept. 18, 1917; trans, as Cook to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Privates, 1st Class 

Brewer, Theodore, enlisted June 25, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Carter, James B^ enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Currie, John M., enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Currie, James W., enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford. Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. E, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Duncan, Homer C, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford. Ind.: 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Hardman, Verne L., enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 



338 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Harrey, Scott W., enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Inman, Ed^ar B^ enlisted May 25, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Kin^, William G,, enlisted June 23, 1917; residence. Greenwood, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. 

C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
McCune, Paul, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Moore, Ralph, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Mitchell, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Beilly, Howard T^ enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Brookln, N. Y.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Roberts, William I^ enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Smith, Paul E^ enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Wible, Charles H„ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Wicker, John G., enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 5. 1917; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Pate, Cam E^ enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Ambler, William H., enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt 1 cl. Aug. 5. 1917; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corps, Clarence C^ enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 5. 1917; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Kern, Wendall W^ enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Bryant, Robert W^ enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 5, 1917; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Bat. C, 

139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 

Privates 
Acton, John, enlisted July 3, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; trans. 

as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Allen, Burel 0^ enlisted Sept. 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Ambler, Frank, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

discharged Aug. 20, 1917. 
Anderson, Roy C, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Austin, Thomas, enlisted Aug. 23, 1917; residence, Mitchell, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Bau^hman, Harry L^ enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 



BATTERY C 33» 



Privates 

Burd, Otis, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Mitchell, Ind.; dis- 
charged Aug. 20, 1917. 
Barton, Herman E., enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Boyd, Emery H., enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Coxton, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Bmce, Earl, enlisted June 3, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; trans. 

as Pvt. to 1st Regt. Ind. F. A. Aug. 19, 1917. 
Byers, Ace A^ enlisted Aug. 3, 1917; residence, Peerless, Ind.; trans. 

as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Byers, Ted, enlisted Sept. 4, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; trans. 

as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30. 1917. 
Carleton, Chester D^ enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Clampitt, Frank W^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Condiff, Jessie J., enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Craiff, Hubert, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, B-edford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30. 1917. 
Davis, Wilfred, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30. 1917. 
Davis, William M^ enlisted Aug. 13, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Denniston, Panl F,, enlisted Sept. 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30. 1917. 
Edwards, John C^ enlisted July 14, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Elkins, James W,, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Linton, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Evans, Thorne 0^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30. 1917. 
Emery Ifoah, enlisted July 3, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; trans. 

as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Fischer, Harry, enlisted June 5, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to 1st Regt. Ind. F. A. Aug. 19, 1917. 
Flynn, Tmman, enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

discharged Aug. 20, 1917. 
Oaines, Charlie, enlisted July 27, 1917; residence, Mitchell, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30. 1917. 
Gaines, Everett, enlisted July 27, 1917; residence, Mitchell, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30. 1917. 
Golden, Howard N., enlisted May 25, 1917 ; residence, Bedford, Ind. ; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Goff, Raymond 0^ enlisted Sept. 20, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Hamilton, Edgar T^ enlisted June 30, 1917; residence, Bedford. Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Hamilton, Robert, enlisted July 31, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Banner, Isaac B., enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Heltonville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Hazel, Lawrence, enlisted Aug. 7, 1917; residence, Bedford Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Hitchcock, George W,, enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Bedford. Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Holmes, Roscoe L^ enlisted June 22, 1917; residence, Williams, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 



340 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Privates 
Huff, Mike, enlisted July 21, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; trans. 

as Pvt. to Bat. E, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Ikerd, Albert, C^ enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Inman, Otto, enlisted Aug. 3, 1917; residence, Heltonville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to 1st Regt. Ind. F. A. Aug. 19, 1917. 
Irwin, Dewey R., enlisted July 14, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
James, John, enlisted July 14, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; trans. 

as Pvt. to Bat. E, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
King, Dewey, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; trans. 

as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
King, Raymond C^ enlisted July 3, 1917; residence. Greenwood, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Kniglit, Harry L., enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Bedford, I^d.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Kniglit, Lawrence, enlisted July 27, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Lane, Charlas enlisted July 30, 1917; residence, Heltonville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Long, Walter J^ enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Love, James, enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Heltonville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt to 1st Regt. Ind. F. A. Aug. 19, 1917. 
Mikels, Ralph, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Mitchell, Alvin A., enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Meyers, Charles, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

discharged Aug. 20, 1917. 
Noe, Clifford G^ enlisted Sept, 20, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Oldham, Anthus D^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 
. trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Owens, Wilbur C^ enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Panzy, Tom, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford Ind.; dis- 
charged Aug. 20, 1917. 
Peyton, John M„ enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Porter, Bruce, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Mitchell, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Pace, Robert, enlisted June 3, 1917; residence, Heltonville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to 1st Regt. Ind. F. A. Aug. 19, 1917. 
Prow, Sigsbee C^ enlisted Aug. 13, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Purlee, Howart E^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Batliff, George A,, enlisted Aug. 14, 1917; residence, Mitchell, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Reynolds, William M^ enlisted Aqg. 15, 1917; residence, Bedford, 

Ind.; trans, as ?vt. to Bat. C. 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Richards, John H^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat, C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Ritchison, Ralpl^, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917 r residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt' to Bat. 0. . 139 P. A, Sept. 30, 1917, 



BATTERY C 341 



Privates 

Kitchison, William R., enlisted Aug. 14, 1917 ; residence, Bedford 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Root, Arthur C^ enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Schmidt, William H^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Short, Harry W^ enlisted July 4, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Smith, Burk J^ enlisted Aug. 12, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Smith, Walter E., enlisted May 29, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

discharged Aug. 20, 1917. 
Sears, Ralph, enlisted July 3, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; trans 

as Pvt. to Bat. E. 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Sears, Robert E^ enlisted Aug. 13, 1917; residence, Orleans, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Taylor, Raymond C^ enlisted Aug. 14, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Trisler, Cloyd E^ enlisted July 30, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Troy, Ernest E^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Tyree, Edd F^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Thomas, Aubrey, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Heltonville, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to 1st Regt. Ind. F. A. Aug. 19, 1917. 
Thompson, Guy, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Heltonville, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to 1st Regt. Ind. F. A. Aug. 19, 1917. 
Torphy, Floyd, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

discharged Aug. 20, 1917. 
Tow, Raymond, enlisted June 3, 1917; residence, Mitchell, Ind. 

discharged Aug. 20, 1917. 
Tungate, Calvin, enlisted Aug. 13, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Underwood, Alfred E^ enlisted July 3, 1917; residence, Bedford 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Underwood, William L^ enlisted July 3, 1917; residence, Bedford 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Vaught, Elmer, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

discharged Aug. 20, 1917. 
West, Raymond, enlisted June 4, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to 1st Regt. Ind. F. A. Aug. 20, 1917. 
Whalan, James P^ enlisted June 16, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Wilder, Stanley D., enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Williams, Tir^l F^ enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Mitchell, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Wagner, Columbus F^ enlisted Sept. 20, 1917; residence, Bedford 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Sup. Co. 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Zonkle, Joseph, enlisted June 16, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Johnson, Dennis S^ enlisted Aug. 13, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. E, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Vandiver, Bruce, enlisted Sept. 12, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. E, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 



342 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

McVeigh, John, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to 1st Regt. Ind. F. A. Aug. 20, 1917. 
Brown, James F^ enlisted May 24, 1917 ; residence, Heltonville, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Bnndy, Edward, enlisted Aug 18, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. C, 139 F. A. Sept. 30, 1917. 



Battery C, 139th Field Artillery 

After the consolidation of Companies E and F, 4th 
Indiana Infantry, and the transfer to artillery ae Battery 
C, 139th Field Artillery, the personnel of the organization 
was divided and assigned to the different positions, such 
as cannoneers, drivers, etc. At this time artillery officers 
from the First Officers' Training Camp were attached 
to the battery and preliminary artillery training was 
begun. The latter part of October a portion of the non- 
commissioned officers of the battery were attached to 
Battery A, 4th Field Artillery, for instruction in regard 
to handling and nomenclature of materiel. This course 
of instruction was carried on until every N. C. 0. in 
the outfit completed the school. During this period rifles 
were issued per an order for heavy field artillery to 
be equipped with such arms. 

Thanksgiving Day was celebrated and the good feed 
was enjoyed by all. Christmas soon came, bringing with 
it first furloughs. Five per cent, of the command was 
allowed to be absent on such leaves at a time and a 
great deal of interest was taken in drawing of names 
to see who would be the ones to go first. Some exceptions 
to the rule were taken into consideration on account of 
sickness. On Xmas eve a very enjoyable entertainment 
was given by the talented members of the organization 
and was greatly appreciated by all. During the course 
of the evening Captain Hall, the Battery Commander, was 
presented with a beautiful Masonic ring and Captain 
Coston, former Company Commander of F Company, 
was presented with a ring bearing the emblem of the 
Fraternal Order of Elks. With each ring went the sea- 
son's greetings from all members of the organization. 




CAPTAIN HARRY R. HALL 



BATTERY C 345 

Xmas day was celebrated with even better chow than any 
previous occasion. During the remainder of the winter 
drill was carried out without interruption and early 
spring found the organization ready for range work, 
both on the rifle and artillery range. While on the 
rifle range the battery held its former high standard and 
qualified quite a few marksmen. 

Monday, May 12th, 1918, orders were received for 
the transfer of 64 men for immediate overseas service and 
practically every man in the battery volunteered for this 
service. It was impossible to handle this thru the volun- 
teer system so the required men were selected from the 
Battery Roster. This detachment of troops left Camp 
Shelby June 4th, 1918, for the Port of Embarkation. 

On May 29th the remainder of the regiment left on 
a five days' hike to Lumberton, Mississippi, which was 
about thirty-five miles from camp. Equipment "A" was 
carried and the men slept in pup tents. The battery kitchen 
was taken in trucks. During the remainder of the summer 
the battery was gradually recruited back to war strength. 
Divisional maneuvers were carried out and on each 
Battery C helped to put over heavy field artillery barrage. 
Work on the artillery range was carried on daily and 
again the organization ranked among the highest. 

On September 5th orders were received to proceed to 
Port of Embarkation and on September 19th Battery 
C, with the remainder of the regiment, left Camp Shelby, 
Mississippi, arriving at Camp Upton, New York, Sep- 
tember 22d. Here the needed part of overseas equipment 
was issued and the regiment was at last ready to pro- 
ceed to France, leaving Camp Upton early October 6th 
and sailing from New York Harbor the afternoon of the 
same day on the English Transport "Cedric.'' Quite a 

23 



346 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

few men of the battery were taken sea-sick and exper- 
ienced all the discomforts of the malady. At Camp Upton 
the regiment ran into an epidemic of influenza, and on 
departure Battery C left nine men sick in the Base 
Hospital. 

Eleven days were taken in transit, the convoy arriving 
at Liverpool, England, October 17th, 1918. From Liver- 
pool the regiment went by rail to a rest camp at Codford, 
Wiltshire, England, arriving there early the following 
morning. After remaining at Codford, England, for 
three days the regiment proceeded to Southampton, 
England, and embarked for France, arriving at Cher- 
bourg, France, October 22d. Two days were spent at 
a rest camp here, when the regiment again entrained 
for a two days' trip. Orders were received to stop at 
Ploermel, France, where the outfit remained until 
November 1st. 

From Ploermel, France, to Camp de Meucon the trip 
was made by motor trucks and by march, arriving at 
Camp de Meucon about 4 p. m.,. the same afternoon. 
At this station the different specialties were taken up 
under instructors who had been at the front and knew 
just how we should handle our work upon arrival there. 
While at this camp the armistice was signed and in a 
very few days we were under orders to proceed to a 
Pork of Embarkation and back again to the good old 
U. S. A. From Camp de Meucon we went to Pontanezen 
Barracks, Brest, France, where we stayed for fifteen 
days awaiting transportation. Sailed from Brest, France, 
on the good ship "George Washington," the "President's 
Ship," December 15th, 1918. Conditions were much better 
on the return voyage and not nearly so many of the boys 
were sea-sick this time. The weather was beautiful and 



2ND LT. R. L. MOUNTJOY 
2ND LT. LONNIE O. FIELD 1ST LT. LESLIE C. PITTS 



BATTERY C 349 

we arrived without mishap at Hoboken, New Jersey, 
December 23d and immediately went to Camp Merritt, 
New Jersey, where the organization remained until Jan- 
uary 5th, 1919. Leaving Camp Merritt, New Jersey, the 
trip to Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana, was completed 
in a little less than two days and immediately upon arrival 
here work was begun towards the demobilization of the 
batteries. 

A very cordial reception was accorded the regiment by 
Indianapolis and all Indiana, and from all directions came 
hearty greetings, "Welcome Home — Indiana's Own." The 
regiment was reviewed by the Governor and other prom- 
inent citizens of the State, and was afterwards entertained 
at the Murat theatre. 

At one o'clock Tuesday afternoon, January 14th, Bat- 
tery C left the Post on two special cars for Indianapolis, 
and there attended a special performance at Keith's the- 
atre. After the performance, which was a very enjoy- 
able affair, the battery proceeded to the banquet hall 
of the Severin hotel, where a sumptuous banquet was 
given the battery. 

On January 15th, 1919, final records having been com- 
pleted, the battery was mustered out in the usual form. 

ROSTER OF BATTERY C, 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

October Ist, 1918 

Capt. Harry R, Hall, commissioned June 16, 1917; residence, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind. 

1st Lieut. Ross E. Watson, commissioned June 16, 1917; residence. 
Ft. Wayne, Ind.; commissioned Capt. May 10, 1918; assigned as 
Adjt. to 2d Battalion May 23, 1917. 

1st Lient, William Ingalls, commissioned June 1, 1917; residence, Bed- 
ford, Ind.; 

1st Lient, Leslie C. Pitts, commissioned June 1, 1917 ; residence, Bed- 
ford, Ind.; commissioned 1st Lieut. April 19, 1918. 

1st Lieut. Percy J. Paxton, commissioned Aug. 15, 1917; residence, 
Princeton, Ind.; commissioned 1st Lieut. Feb. 10, 1918. 

2d Lieut. Yerlin C. Goss, commissioned June 16^ 1917; residence, Marlon 
Ind.; discharged as 2d Lieut. Dec. 19, 1917. 



350 THE STORY OF THE 139,TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

2d Lieut. Lonnie 0. Field, commissioned May 15, 1917; residence, 

Pennville, Ind. 
2d Lieut. R, L. Mountjoy, commissioned May 15, 1918; residence, 

Phoenix, Ariz. 
1st Sergt. Ancil Cook, enlisted June 1; 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, to Replacement Troops, unassigned, Sept. 9, 1918. 
1st Serfft. Max W. Bowen, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence. Upland, 

Ind.; appointed Sergt. Jan. 25, 1918; appointed 1st Sergt. Sept. 

10, 1918. 
Sup. Sergt. E. S. Hulgan, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 
Stable Sergt. Elbert H. Bartlett, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bed- 
ford, Ind.; reduced to Sergt. Jan. 22, 1918; trans, as Sergt. to 

Personnel Detachment, 139 F. A. May 21, 1918. 
Mess Sergt. Neill Stuart, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 
Sergt. Harry C. Quackenbush, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bed- 
ford, Ind.; trans, as Sergt. to Infantry Replacement Troops, June 

6, 1918. 
Sergt. Grover L. Goebel, enlisted June 27, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 
Sergt. David Reed, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence Bedford, Ind. 
Sergt. Guy F. Hummel, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 
Sergt Glen C. Frank, enlisted May 23, 1917 ; residence, Bedford, Ind. 
Sergt Clyde B. Stodghill, enlisted June 30, 1917; residence, Marion. 

Ind.; discharged as Sergt. Jan. 17, 1918. 
Sergt Wendall Wallheiser, enlisted July 3, 1917; residence, Bedford. 

Ind.; reduced to Pvt. Jan. 24, 1918; trans, to Replacement Troops 

Overseas, May 12, 1918. 
Sergt Floyd E. Lindley, enlisted June 30, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Sergt. to Infantry Replacement Troops, June 6, 1918. 
Sergt Robert 0. Martin, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 
Sergt Harold R, Steele, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

reduced to Pvt. Jan. 24, 1918; trans, as Pvt. to 113 Sanitary Train 

Feb. 8, 1918. 
Sergt Edward F. Minch, enlisted June 1, 1917 ; residence, Marion, Ind. 

reduced to Pvt Oct. 30, 1917. 
Sergt Paul McCune, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

appointed Corp. Jan. 25, 1918; appointed Sergt April 11, 1918. 
Sergt Kearney K. Kline, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Upland, Ind. 

appointed Sergt. May 25, 1918. 
Sergt Roy H. Collins, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Summittville, 

Ind.; appointed Sergt June 14, 1918. 
Sergt Frank A. Behers, enlisted Aug. 10, 1917; residence, Marion. Ind.; 

appointed Corp. Jan. 25, 1918; appointed Sergt June 18, 1918. 
Sergt Ralph L. Wible, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Sergt July 30, 1918. 
Sergt. Raymond E. Shemood, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Cass- 

ville. Mo.; appointed Sergt. Aug. 22, 1918; trans, as Sergt. to Base 

Hospital, Camp Upton, N. Y., Oct 5, 1918. 
Sergt Paul R. Leapley, enlisted June 6. 1917; residence, Marlon, Ind.; 

appointed Sergt Sept. 11, 1918. 
Sergt Johannes Frandsen, enlisted March 3, 1914; residence, Port 

Amboy, N. J.; trans, to Bat. C Oct 5, 1918 from 152 Depot Brigade. 
Sergt William H. Reynolds, enlisted June 2, 1917; reduced to Corp. Oct. 

30, 1917; reduced to Pvt. Jan. 24, 1918; trans, as Pvt. to U. S. 

Guards June 11, 1918. 
Corp. Patrick V. Torphy, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford. Ind. 
Corp. Elmer E. Winn, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marlon. Ind.; 

reduced to Pvt. Jan. 22, 1918; trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops 

Overseas May 12, 1918. 



BATTERY C 351 

Corp, William F. Stilwell, enlisted June 13, 1917; residence, Converse, 

Ind. 
Corp. Fred F. Carter, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

reduced to Pvt. Jan. 24, 1918; trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops 

Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Corp. Charles E. Johnson, enlisted June 7, 1917 ; residence, Bedford, Ind. 
Corp. Lewis Ingalls, enlisted July 3, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Corp. to 113 Engineers Jan. 4, 1918. 
Corp. Carl D. McConnell, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

reduced to Pvt. Jan. 24, 1918; trans, as Pvt. to U. S. Guards 

June 11, 1918. 
Corp. Howard L. Keach, enlisted May 24, 1917 ; residence, Bedford, Ind. ; 

reduced to Pvt. Jan. 24, 1918; trans, as Pvt. to Trains, 3d Division 

March 22, 1918. 
Corp. Owen Starrett, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 
Corp. Russell H. Davis, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 
Corp. Joe M. Owens, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 
Corp. Louis C. Short, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

reduced to Pvt. Jan. 14, 1918; trans, as Pvt. to U. S. Guards June 

11, 1918. 
Corp. Ermal Phillips, enlisted July 16, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

reduced to Pvt. Jan. 24, 1918; trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops 

Overseas, May 12, 1918. 
Corp John W. Barker, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

died at New Orleans, La., Nov. 9, 1918. 
Corp. Dewey T. Gresham, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, 

Ind.; reduced to Pvt. Jan. 24, 1918; trans, as Pvt. to Replacement 

Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Corp. Bnrr Stephens, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Fairmount, Ind. 
Corp. William H. Ambler, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, 

Ind.; appointed Corp. Jan. 25, 1918. 
Corp. Cecil L. Alexander, enlisted July 21, 1917; residence. Converse, 

Ind.; appointed Corp. March 15, 1918; trans, as Corp. to Infantry 

Replacement Troops June 6, 1918. 
Corp. George M. Shedron, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, 

Ind.; reduced to Pvt. 1 cl. Oct. 30, 1918; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to 

Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Corp. Glen Bidgway, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

reduced to Pvt. 1 cl. Oct. 30, 1918; appointed Corp. Jan. 25, 1918; 

trans, to Base Hospital, Camp Merritt, N. J., Dec. 30, 1918. 
Corp. John M. Currie, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. Jan. 25, 1918. 
Corp. Clell B. Evans, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. Jan. 25, 1918; reduced to Pvt. and appointed Wag. 

Sept. 11, 1918. 
Corp. Paul E. Smith, enlisted May 23, 1918; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. Aug. 22, 1918. 
Corp. Charles H. Wible, enlisted May 23. 1917; residence, Bedford, 

Ind.; appointed Corp. March 15, 1918. 
Corp. Dale Nicholson, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Fairmount, 

Ind.; appointed Corp. Aug. 22, 1918. 
Corp. Howard Mercer, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. Dec. 1, 1918. 
Corp. Bnrel 0. Allen, enlisted Sept. 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Jan. 22, 1918; appointed Corp. Aug. 22, 1918. 
Corp. Basil E. Bryant, enlisted July 16, 1917; residence. Converse, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. Aug. 22, 1918. 



352 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Corp. Jessie J. Condiff, enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Jan. 22, 1918; appointed Corp. Aug. 22, 1918; 

trans, as Corp. to Gen. Hospital No. 25, Ft. Ben.1. Harrison, 

Jan. 11, 1919. 
Corp. Paul F. Denniston, enlisted Sept. 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Jan. 22, 1918; appointed Corp. Aug. 22, 

1918. 
Corp. Earl A. Ferpruson, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 21, 1918; appointed Corp. Nov. 21, 1918. 
Corp. Thomas E, Hosier, enlisted July 26, 1917; residence, Marion, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Jan. 22, 1918; appointed Corp. Aug. 22, 

1918. 
Corp. William Huber, enlisted June 30, 1917; residence, Portland, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. Aug. 7, 1918. 
Corp. Howard B, Kem, enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. Jan. 25, 1918; trans, as Pvt. to Motor Repair 

Detachment Jan. 28, 1918. 
Corp. Ralph Mikels, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Corp. Aug. 22, 1918. 
Corp, Averctte D. Quesiiiberry, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Claude- 

ville, Va.; appointed Corp. Jan. 25, 1918; reduced to Pvt. Dec. 1, 

1918. 
Corp. Eli E. Thomas, enlisted July 23, 1917; appointed Corp. April 

21, 1918. 
Corp. Cecil E. Hunter, enlisted July 13, 1917; attached to Battery as 

Corp; trans, as Corp. to Hq. Co. 139 F. A. Jan. 7, 1918. 
Saddler James G. Carey, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

appointed Saddler Sept. 30, 1917. 
Horseshoer Chester B. Huffaker, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, 

Marion, Ind.; reduced to Pvt. 1 cl. Jan. 22, 1918; appointed Mech. 

June 19, 1918. 
Horseshoer Lawrence Hazel, enlisted Aug. 7, 1917; residence, Bedford, 

Ind.; reduced to Pvt. Jan. 22, 1918; trans, to U. S. Guards June 

11, 1918. 
Horseshoer Wendall W. Kern, enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Bed- 
ford, Ind.; reduced to Pvt. Jan. 22, 1918; discharged June 19, 1918. 
Chief Mech. Theodore Brewer, enlisted June 25, 1917; residence, Bed- 
ford, Ind.; appointed Mech. Oct. 1, 1918; appointed Chief Mech. 

Aug. 22, 1918. 
Chief Mech. John G. Wicker, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, 

Ind.; appointed Chief Mech. Jan. 22, 1918; reduced to Mech. 

Aug. 22, 1918. 
Chief Mech. Harry L. Marks, enlisted June 1, 1917 ; residence, Marion, 

Ind.; appointed Mech. June 19, 1918; appointed Chief Mech. 

Aug. 22, 1918. 
Mech. James W. Replo^le, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion. 

Ind.; reduced to Pvt. 1 cl. Jan. 22, 1918. 
Mech. Homer C. Duncan, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, 

Ind.; reduced to Pvt. 1 cl. Jan. 22, 1918; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to 

Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Wag. Lewis D. Pence, enlisted July 13, 1917; residence. Converse, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 22, 1918; appointed Wag. Sept. 10, 1918. 
Waff. John M. Peyton, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 22, 1918; appointed Wag. Sept. 10, 1918. 
Wai?. Stanley D. Wilder, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, 

Ind.; appointed Wag. Sept. 10, 1918. 
Wag. PhUip Nelson, enlisted June 20, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 22, 1918; appointed Wag. Sept. 10, 1918. 



BATTERY C 353 



Wag. Robert H. Hopper, enlisted July 12, 1917; residence, Peru, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 22, 1918 ; appointed Wag. Sept. 10, 1918. 
Bugler Lionel D. Maple, enlisted June 23, 1917; residence. Converse, 

Ind.; trans, to Am. University, Washington, D. C, Jan. 28, 1918. 
Bugler John ^Y, Carmichael, enlisted June 23, 1917 ; residence, Bedford, 

Ind.; trans, to Base Hospital, Camp Merritt, N. J., Jan. 5, 1919. 
Bugler Karl M. Billon, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 
reduced to Pvt. Dec. 14, 1917; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Jan. 22, 1918; 
trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to 152 Ambulance Co. April 8, 1918. 
Bugler John C.Lostutter, enlisted Aug. 10, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 
appointed Bugler Aug. 22, 1918; reduced to Pvt. Sept. 10, 1918; 
trans, to Casualty Co. Ft. Benj. Harrison, Ind., Jan. 15, 1919. 
Bugler Emory H. Boyd, enlisted June 2, 1917 ; residence, Bedford, Ind. ; 
appointed Bugler Dec. 14, 1917; discharged as Bugler May 2, 1918. 
Bugler Raymond C. Taylor, enlisted Aug. 14, 1917; residence, Bedford, 

Ind.; appointed Bugler Aug. 22, 1918. 
Cook Edd L. Feighner, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Niles, Mich. 
Cook Arthur J. Haungs, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford. 

Ind.; trans, to School for Cooks and Bakers, May 20, 1918. 
Cook Walter M. Hunter enlisted Aug. 27, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 
Cook Walter M. Lillard, enlisted June 25, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 
Cook Eber J. Baker, enlisted July 24, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

appointed Cook June 19, 1918. 
Privates, 1st Class 

Carter, James R,, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, to Replacement Troops Overseas, May 12, 1918. 
Hardman, Yerne L., enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Hq. 38 Division Dec. 23, 1917. 
Harvey, Scott W., enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Inman, Edgar B., enlisted May 25, 1917; residence, Bedford. Ind.; 
trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Hq. Troops, 63 F. A. Brigade, June 20, 1918. 
Rook, Clarence C enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

reduced to Pvt. Jan. 22, 1918. 
King, William G^ enlisted June 23, 1917; residence, Greenwood, Ind. 
Davis, Mahlon 0., enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, to Hq. Troop 38 Division Dec. 23, 1917. 
Moore, Ralph, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Mitchell, Ind. 
Blanco, Leandro, enlisted July 17, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt, to Hq. Det. 63 F. A. Brigade, July 17, 1918. 
Reilly, Howard T., enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Roberts, William I., enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 
trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Infantry Replacement Troops, June 6, 1918. 
Fitzsimmons, Edward, enlisted July 16, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 
trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Replacement Troops Overseas, May 12, 1918. 
Hatfield, Beaty F., enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Pate, Cam E^ enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; trans. 

to U. S. Guards June 11. 1918. 
Martz, Geo. E., enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; trans. 

to Motor Repair Detachment Jan. 28, 1918. 
Corps, Clarence C enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 
Stinson, Worthington W., enlisted July 27, 1917; residence, Marion, 
Ind.; reduced to Pvt. Jan. 22, 1918; trans, to Replacement Troops 
Overseas, May 12, 1918. 
Austin, Thomas, enlisted Aug. 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 
appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 22, 1918. 



354 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Bartholomew, Thomas E^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 22, 1918. 
Barton, Herman E^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Jan. 22, 1918; trans, to Ship's Hospital of 

George Washington Dec. 23, 1918. 
Clampitt, Frank W^ enlisted May 23, 1917 ; residence, Bedford, Ind. ; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Jan. 22, 1918. 
Betamore, Tolney 0^ enlisted July 17, 1917; residence. Converse, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 10, 1918. 
Erwin, Carl G^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 10, 1918. 
Gaines, Charlie, enlisted July 27, 1917; residence, Mitchell, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 22, 1918. 
Gaines, Everett, enlisted July 27, 1917; residence, Mitchell, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 22, 1918. 
Gargis, Christos K^ enlisted July 28, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 22, 1918; trans, to Base Hospital, Camp 

Upton, N. Y., Oct. 5, 1918. 
Banner, Isaac B^ enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Heltonville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 11, 1918. 
Kneib, Valentine F., enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 22, 1918, 
£night, Harry L^ enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug, 22, 1918. 
Lane, Charlas L^ enlisted July 30, 1917; residence, Heltonville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 11, 1918. 
Lewis, Lawrence, enlisted June 29, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind,; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 22, 1918. 
Martin, Clifford A^ enlisted July 20, 1917; residence, Marlon, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Jan, 22, 1918. 
Mast, Clarence J^ enlisted July 13, 1917; residence. Converse, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 22, 1918. 
Mitchell, Alvin A^ enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind,; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 10, 1918. 
Pallnm, Noah W^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Van Buren, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 10, 1918. 
Parsons, Thomas, enlisted July 6, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 10, ]918. 
Richards, John M^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 22, 1918; appointed Corp, Jan, 1, 1919, 
Shelton, Wilbur C, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind,; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 10, 1918, 
Spahr, Leo J^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind,; 

appointed Pvt, 1 cl. Aug. 22, 1918. 
Trlsler, Cloyd E^ enlisted July 30, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.: 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 10, 1918; trans, to Gen. Hospital No, 25. 

Ft. Benj. Harrison, Ind,, Jan, 11, 1919, 
Troy, Earnest E^ enlisted May 2^, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.: 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept, 10, 1918, 
VIckrey, Norman, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind,; 

appointed Pvt, 1 cl. Aug. 22, 1918. 
Wlldoner, Forrest E^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind,; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 10, 1918. 
IVilllams, Virgil F^ enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Mitchell, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 10, 1918. 
Winger, Lawrence, J,, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion. Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 22, 1918. 



BATTERY C 355 

Friyates 
Wintz, Albert, enlisted July 13, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Aug. 22, 1918. 
Byers, Ace A^ enlisted Aug. 3, 1917; residence. Peerless, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1918. 
Cnnningham, William J., enlisted July 12, 1917; residence. Converse, 

Ind.; appointd Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1918. 
Hitchcock, George W^ enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Bedford, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Jan. 22, 1918; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to 

Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Irwin, Orange T^ enlisted July 13, 1917; residence, Converse, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Jan. 22, 1918; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Replace- 
ment Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Irwin, Dewey R., enlisted July 14, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1. 1918. 
Xoe, Clifford, enlisted Sept. 20, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Jan. 22, 1918; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Replace- 
ment Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Prow, Siffsbee C^ enlisted Aug. 13, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1918. 
Whalen, James P., enlisted June 16, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. May 8, 1918; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to Replace- 
ment Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Acton, John, enlisted July 3, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; trans. 

as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Ballard, Wesley, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to 313 Auxiliary Remount Depot, Dec. 1, 1917. 
Ballinger, Ralph W^ enlisted Aug. 10, 1917; residence. Upland, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to 313 Auxiliary Remount Depot Dec. 1, 1917. 
Baughman, Harry L^ enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Infantry Replacement Troops June 6, 1918. 
Biggs, Chester S., enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

died at Base Hospital, Camp Shelby, Miss., July 11, 1918. 
Brown, Clem, enlisted July 13, 1917; residence. Converse, Ind.; 

discharged April 23, 1918. 
Brown, James F^ enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Heltonville, Ind. 
Bnndy, Edward, enlisted Aug. 18, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Bnrk, Jay M« enlisted July 21, 1917; residence. Converse, Ind.; 

trans, to Infantry Replacement Troops June 6, 1918. 
Byers, Ted, enlisted Sept. 10, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; trans. 

to Base Hospital, Camp Merritt, N. J., Jan. 5, 1919. 
Carleton, Chester D^ enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 
Com, George C- enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Cox, Raymond, enlisted June 18, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Craig, Hubert, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; trans. 

as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Dangerfield, Delton, enlisted July 9, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Davis, Wilfred, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to U. S. Guards, June 11, 1918. 
Davis, William M,, enlisted Aug. 13, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Desper, George C^ enlisted Aug. 20, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

discharged April 10, 1918. 



356 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Privates 
Dicken, Waldo, enlisted July 25, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; trans. 

as Pvt. to 313 Auxiliary Remount Depot Jan. 8, 1918. 
DimJck, Marion, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Drook, Paul, enlisted July 13, 1917; residence, Converse, Ind. 
Edwards, John C, enlisted July 14, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Elkins, James W., enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Linton, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Ellsworth, Walter, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to U. S. Guards June 11, 1918. 
Emery, Noah, enlisted July 3, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; trans. 

as PVt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Fischer, William A., enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Fnrnish, Ray 0., enlisted Aug. 4. 1917; residence, Marion. Ind.; 

discharged Dec. 15, 1917. 
Gillmore, Walter H., enlisted July 27, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to 313 M. P. June 12, 1918. 
Golden, Howard N^ enlisted May 25, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Goff, Raymond 0., enlisted Sept. 20, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 313 Auxiliary Remount Depot Jan. 8, 1918. 
Graham, John E,, enlisted July 16, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Gray, William D^ enlisted July 30, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Gnnn, Charles C, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence. Van Buren, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Hamilton, Ed^r T^ enlisted June 30, 1917 ; residence, Bedford, Ind. ; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918; 

rejoined organization Nov. 20, 1918. 
Hamilton, Robert, enlisted July 31, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Hatiield, James L^ enlisted July 13, 1917; residence, Converse, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Holmes, Boscoe L^ enlisted June 22, 1917; residence, Williams, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Veterinary Corps unassigned, Dec. 20, 1917. 
Howe, Samuel, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence. Grant County, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Ikerd, Albert C, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
King, Dewey, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; died 

at Base Hospital, Camp Shelby, Miss., Dec. 21, 1917. 
Kin^, Raymond C^ enlisted July 3, 1917; residence. Greenwood, Ind. 
Knight, Lawrence, enlisted July 27, 1917; residence, Bedford. Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Knox, Gerald L^ enlisted July 13, 1917; residence. Converse, Ind.; 

trans.as Pvt. to Casual Co., Ft. Benj. Harrison, Ind., Jan. 15, 1919. 
Long, Walter J„ enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.;» 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Love, Walter J,, enlisted July 18, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Moore, Jesse, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence. Fox Station, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Newton, Fred L„ enlisted Aug. 3, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 



BATTERY C 357 



Priyates 

Norton, Albert J^ enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Oldliam, Aiitlms D^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Owens, Wilbur C^ enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to 113 Signal Battalion Feb. 19, 1918. 
Parson, Clayton B^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Pitts, Carl L., enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; trans 

as Pvt. to Trains 3rd Division March 22, 1918. 
Porter, Bruce, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Mitchell, Ind. 
Purlee, Howard E., enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Ratliff, George A., enlisted Aug. 14, 1917; residence, Mitchell, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to U. S. Guards June 11, 1938. 
Rennaker, Elzie M., enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Reynolds, James R^ enlisted July 21, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Reynolds, William M^ enlisted Aug. 15, 1917; residence, Bedford 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to U. S. Guards June 11, 1918. 
Ritchison, Ralph, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Ritchison, William R^ enlisted Aug. 14, 1917; residence, Bedford 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918 
Root, Arthur C^ enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Russell, Bun F^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to U. S. Guards June 11, 1918. 
Schmidt, William H^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918, 
Shinn, Harry L., enlisted July 13, 1917; residence, Converse, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Smith, Burk J^ enlisted Aug. 12. 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

discharged Dec. 15, 1917. 
Stone, Frederick M^ enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Portland, Ind. 

discharged March 1, 1918. 
Swisher, Chester P., enlisted Aug. 10, 1917; residence, Jonesboro 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918 
Tippett, Joseph W., enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion. Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Trostel, Taughn, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 
Tyree, Edd F^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Bedford. Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Underwood, Alfred E^ enlisted July 3, 1917; residence, Bedford 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918 
Underwood, William L^ enlisted July 3, 1917; residence, Bedford 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918 
Wallace, Ira Y^ enlisted July 18, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Whiteman, Ira M^ enlisted July 12, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Wilson, William A,, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 
Zonkle, Joseph, enlisted June 16, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind. 

trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Rudolph, Carlyle S., enlisted Sept. 6, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind. 

discharged Oct. 17, 1917. 



358 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 



Lawson, Lawrence, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Grant County, 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to 313 M. P. Oct. 8, 1917. 
Marks, Andrew J^ enlisted June 2, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to 313 M. P. Oct. 8, 1917; rejoined organization Nov. 

6, 1917; trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 

1918. 
Bryant, Robert W^ enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to 313 M. P. Oct. 8, 1917. 
Anderson, Roy C^ enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to 313 M. P. Oct. 8, 1917. 
Penrod, Paul J^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Van Buren, Ind.; 

discharged May 28, 1918. 

The following men received from first draft from Camp Taylor, Ky., 
and assigned to Battery C, October 20, 1917. 
Priyates 
Groh, John, enlisted Sept. 20, 1917; residence, Wabash, Ind.; trans. 

as Pvt. to U. S. Guards June 11, 1918. 
Eleinkni^ht, Warren G., enlisted Sept. 20, 1917; residence, Wabash, 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Rish, Harry, enlisted Sept. 20, 1917; residence, Wabash, Ind.; trans. 

as Pvt. to Replacement Troops Overseas May 12, 1918. 
Swihart, Allen L^ enlisted Oct. 5, 1917; residence, Wabash, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Q. M. C. Camp Shelby, Miss., Jan. 23, 1918. 

The following named men received from Detention Camp, Camp 
Shelby, Miss., and assigned to Battery C, June 17, 1918. 
Privates 
Allsnp, Earl S., enlisted May 24, 1918; residence. Rock Island, 111. 
Battley, James N^ enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, Ridgeland, 

Miss., trans, as Pvt. to Base Hospital, Camp Upton, N. Y., Oct. 5, 

1918. 
Cobb, Marcus L^ enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, DeKalb, Miss.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Development Battalion, Camp Shelby, Miss., 

Aug. 29, 1918. 
Cunningham, William E^ enlisted May 27, 1918; residence. Meridian, 

Miss.; discharged Aug. 8, 1918. 
Downs, Jesse, enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, Bay Springs, Miss.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Sanitary Detachment, Detention Camp, Camp 

Shelby, Miss., Aug. 16, 1918. 
Dnnlap, Charlie H,, enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, Oxford, Miss. 
Emerson, Clifford A,, enlisted May 24, 1918; residence, Jackson- 
ville, 111.; trans, as Pvt. to Development Battalion, Camp Shelby, 

Miss., Sept. 1, 1918. 
Funk, Roland H., enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, Riggston, 111. 
Olaser, Theodore 0., enlisted May 24. 1918; residence, Minier, 111. 
Gootee, Patrick L,, enlisted May 27, 1918; residence. Canton, Miss. 
Gordon, James L., enlisted May 27. 1918; residence, Bentonville. Ark. 
Gregory, Earl, enlisted May 25, 1918; residence, Rock Island. 111. 
Grier, Roprer A,, enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, Mahan, Miss. 
Gunn, Christopher C, enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, Hattiesburg, 

Miss. 
Hall, Luther M., enlisted May 24, 1918; residence, Marion, 111. 
Henderson, Eddie L,, enlisted May 26, 1918; residence, Center. Miss.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Base Hospital, Camp Upton, N. Y., Oct. 5, 1918. 
Hlldebrandt, William, enlisted May 25, 1918 ; residence. Rock Island. 

111. 



BATTERY C 359 

Priyates 
Hinkle, Charles L^ enlisted May 24, 1918; residence, Pekin, 111.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1918. 
Hoist, TVilliam H^ enlisted May 25, 1918; residence, Rock Island, 111. 
Hamblet, Samuel H^ enlisted May 26, 1918; residence, Paris, Miss.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Transport Hospital No. 242 Oct. 10, 1918. 
McGinnis, Edgar J^ enlisted May 24, 1918; residence, Jacksonville. 

111. 
McMahon, Edward D., enlisted May 24, 1918; residence, Streator, 

111.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1918. 
Peterson, Thomas J^ enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, Batesville, 

Miss. 
Phillips, Milton G^ enlisted May 24, 1918; residence. Deer Creek, 111. 
Poff, Theodore F^ enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, Ashland, Miss.; 

trans, as Pvt. to New Zealand Military Hospital, Camp Codford. 

Wilts, England, Oct. 20, 1918. 
Poff, James >y^ enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, Ashland, Miss. 
Richardson, Oliver C^ enlisted May 25, 1918; residence, Washing- 
ton, Iowa. 
Rone, Tobe V^ enlisted May 26, 1918; residence, Ethel, Miss. 
Ruby, Clarence C^ enlisted May 26, 1918; residence, Como, Miss. 
Sanders, Charlie J^ enlisted May 26, 1918; residence, Wilkinson, 

Miss.; trans, as Pvt. to Base Hospital, Camp Shelby, Miss., Sept. 

17, 1918. 
Lar|?ent, Sylvester, enlisted May 24, 1918; residence, Hanna City, 

111.; trans, as Pvt. to Development Battalion, Camp Shelby, Miss.. 

Aug. 29, 1918. 
Schadt, Otto, enlisted May 25, 1918; residence, Rock Island, 111. 
Sheehan, Joseph, enlisted May 24. 1918; residence, Jacksonville, 111.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1918. 
Snell, Alfred F^ enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, Coldwater, Miss. 
Stear, Charles H^ enlisted May 24, 1918; residence, Hanna, 111.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Transport Hospital No. 242 Oct. 14, 1918. 
Stear, Robert R^ enlisted May 24. 1918; residence, Edwards, 111.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 10, 1918. 
Stuart, William E^ enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, Alsey, 111.; 

trans, as Pvt. to New Zealand Military Hospital, Camp Codford, 

Wilts, England, Oct. 20, 1918. 
Tapper, Willie H^ enlisted May 27, 1918; residence. Popes, Miss.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Development Battalion, Camp Shelby, Miss., 

July 20, 1918. 
Tousinau, Robert L., enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, Centerville, 

Miss. 
Touni?, Tommie, enlisted May 27, 1918; residence. Popes, Miss.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Development Battalion, Camp Shelby, Miss,, 

July 6, 1918. 
Toungblood, Alfred, enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, Sarah, Miss,; 

trans, as Pvt. to Base Hospital, Camp Upton, N. Y., Oct. 5, 1918 

The following namrd man received from Detention Camp, Camp 
Shelby, Miss., and assigned to Battery C, July 27, 1918. 
Private 

Hobbs, Harry, enlisted July 6, 1918; residence, Moro, Ark. 



360 THE STORY OP THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

The following named men received from University of Wisconsin, 
Training Detachment, N. A., and assigned to Battery C, Aug. 14, 1918. 
Priyates 
Stephenson, Clair H., enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Sheboygan 

Falls, Wis. 
Udelhoyen, William H^ enlisted June 15, 1918; residence, Platte- 

ville, Wis. 
Wilk, Ferdinand H^ enlisted June 15, 1918; residence, Alma, Wis. 

The following named men received from Sweeney Auto School, 
Training Detachment, N. A., and assigned to Battery C, Aug. 17, 1918. 

Privates 

Kelly, Edward I^ enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Chicago, 111. 
Lindstrom, John W. enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, DeKalb, 111. 
Linsky, Lonis, enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Chicago, 111. 
Lueck, Leonard L^ enlisted June 14, 1918; residence Eldorado, Kans. 
McCartney, Warren N^ enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Chicago, 

111.; trans, as Pvt. to Base Hospital, Camp Upton, N. Y., Oct. 5, 1918. 
McColIum, Harold R*, enlisted June 15, 1918; residence, Danville, 111.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Transport Hospital No. 242 Oct. 16, 1918. 
McCuUongh, John W., enlisted June 22, 1918; residence, Aurora, 111. 
McGeever, Sylvester T^ enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Chicago, 

111. 
McKenna, Frank J., enlisted June 13, 1918; residence, Chicago, 111.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Base Hospital, Camp Upton, N. Y., Oct. 5, 1918. 
McMahon, Leo D^ enlisted June 22, 1918; residence, Chicago, 111. 
Mahoney, John T^ enlisted June 13, 1918; residence, Chicago, 111. 
Markns, Charles J^ enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Chicago, 111. 
Michalopuolos, Constlntine A^ enlisted June 13, 1918; residence, 

Chicago, 111. 
Michuda, Paul A^ enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Chicago, 111. 
Milanowski, Mike, enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Chicago, 111. 
Miller, Franz W., enlisted June 12, 1918; residence, Carpenterville, 

111. 
Miller, William, enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Chicago, 111. 
Moore, Thomas F., enlisted June 13, 1918; residence, Chicago, 111. 
Mueller, Walter J., enlisted June 13, 1918; residence, Chicago, 111. 
Munch, Harry E., enlisted June 21, 1918; residence, Sandwich. 111.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Development Battalion, Camp Shelby, Miss., 

Sept. 16, 1918. 
Murphy, John E*, enlisted June 13, 1918; residence, Chicago, 111. 
Nacofske, Albert A^ enlisted June 13, 1918; residence, Chicago, 111. 
Napoli, Albert D., enlisted June 13, 1918 ; residence, Chicago Heights, 

HI. 
Nash, Robert B., enlisted June 21, 1918; residence, Rockford, 111. 
Nielsen, Arthur E^ enlisted June 13, 1918; residence, Chicago, 111. 
Ray, Charles E^ enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Rochelle, 111. 
Snyder, Louis E^ enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Centralia, 111. 
Tomisek, John J., enlisted June 21, 1918; residence, Chicago, 111. 

The following named men received from University of Minnesota, 
Training Detachment, St. Paul, Minn., and assigned to Battery C, 
Aug. 21, 1918. 
Private 

Brown, Cleon A^ enlisted June 15, 1918; residence, Eveleth, Minn. 



BATTERY C 361 

The following named men received from Detention Camp, Camp 
Shelby, Miss., and assigned to Battery C, Aug. 23, 1918. 

Priyates 
Baker, Ed^r A^ enlisted Aug. 7, 1918; residence, Minden, La. 
Bates, Lee L^ enlisted Aug. 8, 1918; residence, Talladega, Ala. 
Bezepke, Frank E^ enlisted Aug. 5, 1918; residence, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Bishop, Ernest, enlisted Aug. 8, 1918; residence, Hampshire, Tenn.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Development Battalion, Camp Shelby, Miss., 

Sept. 16, 1918. 
Bowles, Raymond 0., enlisted Aug. 6, 1918; residence, Hornersville, 

Mo. 
Burkes, Other N^ enlisted Aug. 8, 1918; residence, Edinburg, Miss. 
Day, John P^ enlisted Aug. 8, 1918; residence, Cruger, Miss.; trans. 

to Transport Hospital No. 242 Oct. 8, 1918; died at Seas Oct. 16. 1918. 
Dillard, John C^ enlisted Aug. 8, 1918; residence, Columbia, Ala. 
Doyle, Lnther T,, enlisted Aug. 7, 1918; residence, Cornith, Miss. 
Garrigan, Peter, enlisted Aug. 7, 1918; residence. New Orleans, La. 
Graham, William F^ enlisted Aug. 5, 1918; residence. Cedar Bluff, 

Miss. 
Harper, IVilliam 0^ enlisted Aug. 8, 1918; residence, Red Level, Ala. 
Hildreth, Major R^ enlisted Aug. 8, 1918; residence, Cumberland 

City, Tenn. 
Knowles, Eugene H., enlisted Aug. 8, 1918; residence, Fitzpatrick, Ala. 
Martin, Pierre, enlisted Aug. 8, 1918; residence, Scott, La. 
Merrell, Jesse N^ enlisted Aug. 7, 1918; residence, Shelby, Ala. 
Mixson, James L., enlisted Aug. 7, 1918; residence. New Brockton, 

Ala.; trans, as Pvt. to Base Hospital, Camp Upton, N. Y., Oct. 

5, 1918. 
Laird, Patrick P^ enlisted Aug. 6, 1918; residence, Halliday, Ark. 
Lawson, Hobart M^ enlisted Aug. 6, 1918; residence, Cleveland, 

Tenn.; trans, as Pvt. to Pontanezen Barracks, France, Dec. 15, 1918. 
Levoy, Clyde, enlisted Aug. 8, 1918; residence, Nola, Miss. 
Schmidt., Fred C, enlisted Aug. 8, 1918; residence, Hanceville, Ala. 

The following named men received from Detention Camp, Camp 
Shelby, Miss, and assigned to Battery C, Sept. 1, 1918. 

Private 
DeCastro, Lester J^ enlisted Aug. 16, 1918; residence, New Orleans, 
La. 

The following named men transferred from Headquarters Company 
to Battery C, Aug. 23, 1918. 

Privates 
Orr, Robert, enlisted May 24, 1918; residence, Harvard, 111. 
Peters, Herbert H^ enlisted June 1, 1918; residence, Summerfield, 

111.; trans, to Base Hospital, Camp Upton, N. Y., Oct. 5, 1918. 
Robinson, Preston B^ enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, Waterford, 
Miss. 

The following named enlisted man, formerly a member of Battery 
P, 139th F. A., and transferred to June Replacement Troops Over- 
seas, assigned to this organization Nov. 20, 1918. 
Private 

Addin^on, Morris M., enlisted Aug. 19, 1917; residence, Indianapo- 
lis. Ind. 



24 



362 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

The following named men assigned to Battery at Camp Upton, 
N. Y., Oct. 2, 1918. 
Priyates 
Hoffpauir, Raleigh, enlisted May 25, 1918; residence, Crowley, La. 
Kenyon, Albert, enlisted Jan. 31, 1916; residence, Streator, 111. 
Simpson, Allen H^ enlisted Sept. 12, 1914; residence, New York 

City, N. Y. 
Dean, James M., enlisted June 9, 1917; residence, Eros, La.; trans. 

as Pvt. to Base Hospital, Camp Merritt, N. J., Jan. 5, 1919. 
Novinski, Frank J^ enlisted April 2, 1918; residence, Stitzer, Wis. 
Hunter, James E^ enlisted April 27, 1918; residence, Jasper, Fla.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Gen. Hospital No. 25, Ft. Benj. Harrison, Ind., 

Jan. 11, 1919; 
Minger, William C^ enlisted June 26, 1918; residence, Westville, Fla. 
Morris, Otis T^ enlisted Nov. 19, 1917; residence, Dale, Tex. 



m MEMORIAM 

Corp. John W. Barker, enlisted in Co. E, 4tli Ind. Inf., at Marion, 
Ind., Aug. 4, 1917. He proved to be quite efficient in visual 
signalling and rendered valuable services in both Co. E, 
and Bat. C, 139tli F. A. Corp. Barker died at Charity Hos- 
pital, New Orleans, La., Nov. 9, 1917. 

Pvt. Dewey King enlisted in Co. F, 4th Ind. Inf., at Bedford, Ind., 
Aug. 4, 1917. Pvt. King was leading the life of a good 
soldier when misfortune in the form of a severe attack of 
pneumonia overtook him and death occurred at Base Hos- 
pital, Camp Shelby, Miss., Dec. 21, 1917. 

Pvt. Chester S. Biggs enlisted in Co. E, 4th Ind. Inf., at Marion, 
Ind., June 1, 1917. While with the 4th Ind. Inf. and Bat. C, 
139th F. A. Pvt. Biggs' record was that of a good soldier. 
His illness came as a surprise to his comrades and when, 
on July 9, 1918, death occurred, much regret was felt. 

Pvt. John P. Day, called into service by Carroll County, Miss., 
Board Aug. 8, 1918, and assigned to Bat. C, 139th F. A., 
Aug. 23, 1918. Pvt. Day took sick on board Transport 
"Cedric" while enroute to France and died of Spanish 
Influenza while at sea on Oct. 16, 1918, and was buried 
at Liverpool, England. 

Pvt. 1 cl. Scott W. Harvey enlisted in Co. F, 4th Ind. Inf.. at 
Bedford, Ind., May 23, 1917. When orders were received 
for June Replacement Troops, Pvt. Harvey was selected 
with the detachment of sixty-four members of Battery C 
and left with willingness, although he knew the replacement 
troops were to go directly to the front. On arriving in 
France he volunteered for immediate service and was 
assigned to the Artillery branch of the service again. On 
Oct. 9, 1918, Pvt. Harvey paid the supreme sacrifice while 
in the performance of his duties. 

Prt, Lawrence A. Holliday enlisted at Marion, Ind., June 1, 1917, 
in Co. E, 4th Ind. Inf., but on account of disability was 
discharged Sept. 4, 1917. However, Pvt. Holliday again 
succeeded in getting into service and was stationed at Camp 
Custer, Mich., when the summons came, having been ill 
with Spanish Influenza. 



Company G, 4th Indiana Infantry 

During the month of April, 1917, shortly after the 
declaration of war between the United States and Ger- 
many, the organization of an infantry company was 
started in Evansville, for the Indiana National Guard. 
A cavalry troop was already in process of organization. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Julius Blum, Indiana National Guard, 
retired, and Captain Caleb K. Wheeler were the leading 
spirits in this work, assisted by Mr. P. P. Carroll of the 
Evansville Courier, which newspaper contributed a room 
near the corner of Second and Main Street, for use as 
a recruiting station. Charles J. Folz, who had been on 
the Mexican Border with Company F, 1st Indiana 
Infantry, in 1916, took charge of the office work and 
started recruiting for the company. On May 4th, the first 
recruits, about sixty in number, were sworn into the 
service. Recruiting continued throughout the months of 
May and June, and in July the company was inspected, 
accepted for Federal service by the U. S. Inspecting Officer 
and designated as Company G, 4th Indiana Infantry, 
National Guard. The following were the officers : Captain 
Caleb K. Wheeler, commissioned July 14, 1917; 1st Lieu- 
tenant Henry N. O'Dell, commissioned July 17, 1917; 
2d Lieutenant Charles J. Folz, commissioned July 17, 1917. 

On August 5th, 1917, the Indiana National Guard 
answered the President's call into the Federal service. 
Company G assembled at the Coliseum, Evansville, Indiana, 
where it was quartered with Troop A for a month. The 
Federal examination and muster took place on August 
8th, 1917. While Company G was principally an Evans- 
ville organization and was known locally as the Courier 



364 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Company, almost a third of its membership came from 
Warren County, mostly from Boonville and Newburg. 
There were also a few men from Spencer and Gibson 
Counties and from Kentucky. 

The first night in the Coliseum all slept on the floor, 
which was of concrete, but the following day an appeal 
was made to the Red Cross at Evansville and two hundred 
and fifty bed sacks were made that day and furnished 
to the troop and the company, with straw to fill them 
arrived in time to make the second night's sleep more 
comfortable. While in Evansville constant drill and 
marches were held, drills being held in Sunset Park, and 
the troops were fed in the Acme Hotel building, meals 
being furnished by contract. Several receptions and patri- 
otic meetings were held during the time of the company's 
stay in Evansville, by the Red Cross, G. A. R. and 
kindred organizations, and everything possible was done 
to add to the men's entertainment and comfort. 

On September 4th, 1917, at 8:30 a. m., orders and 
transportation were received to proceed to Fort Benjamin 
Harrison, Indiana, and the C. & E. I. Railroad at once 
prepared a special train which left at 11 a. m. and 
arrived at Fort Benjamin Harrison, where the company 
first joined the companies forming the 4th Indiana 
Infantry. While at Fort Harrison company and battalion 
drills, regimental parades and maneuvers were regularly 
held until September 25th, 1917, when the company, with 
the rest of the regiment, entrained for Camp Shelby, 
Mississippi, where it arrived on September 27th. 

Company G's life as an infantry organization was 
short, as the 4th Indiana Infantry was changed into 
heavy artillery on October 1st. Battery D, 139th Field 
Artillery, was formed by the consolidation of the infantry 



BATTERY D ^65 

companies of G and H, of the 4th Indiana Infantry. There 
being too many men in the two infantry companies for 
tiie formation of a battery of artillery, the surplus non- 
commissioned officers were transferred in the grade they 
held to the Headquarters Company of the 139th Field 
Artillery, while the privates were transferred to Battery 
E and the Supply Company of the 139th Field Artillery, 
the officers being transferred, in the same grade, to 
Battery D, 139th Field Artillery. 

BOSTER OF COMPANY G, 4TH INDIANA INFANTRY. 

Capt Caleb K. >Yheeler, commissioned July 14, 1917; residence, Evans- 
ville, Ind.; assigned as Capt. Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Ist Lieut. Harry N. 0*Dell, commissioned July 17, 1917; residence, 
Evansville, Ind.; assigned as 1st Lieut. Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 
30, 1917. 

2d Lieut. Cliarles J. Folz, commissioned July 17, 1917; residence, 
Evansville, Ind.; assigned as 2d Lieut. Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 
30, 1917. 

1st Sergt. John W. Kemmellnj?, enlisted June 5, 1917; residence, Evans- 
ville, Ind.; trans, as 1st Sergt. to Hq. Co., 139 F. A., Sept. 30 1917. 

Mess Ser^t. Shirley G. Davidson, enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, 
Boonville, Ind.; trans, as Sergt. to Hq. Co., 139 F. A., Sept. 30. 1917. 

Sup. Sergt. Charles W. Helverson, enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, 
Evansville, Ind; trans, as Sup. Sergt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 
30, 1917. 

Ser^ Henry H. Barnett, enlisted July 18, 1917; residence, Evansville, 
Ind.; trans, as Sergt. to Hq. Co., 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Sergt. Marion G. Cornell, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Evans- 
ville, Ind.; trans, as Sergt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Sergt. Earl A. Ivy, enlisted July 26, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 
trans, as Sergt to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Sergt. Lester R. McCool, enlisted July 21, 1917; residence, Evansville, 
Ind.; trans, as Sergt. to Bat. D, 139 F-. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Sergt. Marcus F. Simon, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Evansville, 
Ind.: trans, as Sergt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Sergt. Clifford H. Stratton, enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Evans- 
ville, Ind.; trans, as Sorgt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Sergt. Earl V. "Wilhelm, enlisted May 8. 1917; residence, Evansville, 
Ind.; trans, as Sergt. to Bat. D. 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Sergt. Floyd >V. Williams, enlisted May 5, 1917; residence, Evansville, 
Ind.; trans, as Sergt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Corp. Ottry Birge, enlisted July 20, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 
trans, as Corp. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Corp. John F. Burton, enlisted June 5. 1917; residence, Evansville, 
Ind.; trans, as Corp. to Bat. D. 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Corp. Oswold R, Blnm, enlisted July 19, 1917; rpsidence, Evansville, 
Ind.: trans, as Corp. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Corp. Harry Cox, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 
trans, as Corp. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 



366 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Corp. John E, Cole, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 
trans, as Corp. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Corp. Edward C. Castle, enlisted June 30, 1917; residence, Evansville, 
Ind.; trans, as Corp. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Corp. Charles A. Collins, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Boonville, 
Ind.; trans, as Corp. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Corp. Herndon C. Doyle, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Evansville, 
Ind.; trans, as Corp. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Corp. Clarence Graham, enlisted June 5, 1917; residence, Evansville, 
Ind.; trans, as Corp. to Hq. Co., 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Corp. Atlas S. Greenfield, enlisted June 5, 1917; residence, Evansville, 
Ind.; trans, as Corp. to Hq. Co., 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Corp. Frederick Kranse, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Evansville, 
Ind; trans, as Corp. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Corp. Arthur Musgrave, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Mt. Carmel, 
111.; trans, as Corp. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Corp. Eay J. Montschaka, enlisted June 30, 1917; residence, Evans- 
ville, Ind.; trans, as Corp. to Hq. Co., 139 F. A., Sept. 30 ,1917. 

Corp. Walter M. Schaum, enlisted June 5, 1917; residence, Evans- 
ville, Ind.; trans, as Corp. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Corp. William Schriek, enlisted May 4, 1917 ; residence, Evansville, 
Ind.; trans, as Corp. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Corp. Harry F. Taylor, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Evansville, 
Ind.; trans, as Corp. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Corp. Floyd W. Wilder, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Newburg, 
Ind.; trans, as Corp. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Mech. Emery R. Gleason, enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Madill, 
Okla.; trans, as Mech. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Mech. Leslie E, Greenfield, enlisted June 5, 1917 ; residence, Evans- 
ville, Ind.; trans, as Mech. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Mech. Allen A. Patterson, enlisted July 20, 1917; residence, Evans- 
ville, Ind.; trans, as Mech. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Cook William D. Hunt, enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Mt. Vernon, 
Ind.; trans, as Cook to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Cook Antone Rego, enlisted June 5, 1917; residence, Vincennes, Ind.; 
trans, as Cook to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Cook Sylvester J. Vanderschmidt, enlisted July 20, 1917; residence, 
Evansville, Ind.; trans, as Cook to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Horseshoer James E. Allen, enlisted June 5, 1917; residence, Newburg, 
Ind.; trans, as Horseshooer to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Horseshoer Oscar St. Clair, enlisted June 5, 1917; residence, Evans- 
ville, Ind.; trans, as Horseshoer to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Bugler Clyde R, Hammond, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Rockport, 
Ind.; trans, as Bugler to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Bugler Louis E. Wattum, enlisted May 4, 1917; residence, Evansville, 
Ind.; trans, as Bugler to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Privates 
Abshire, James W., enlisted June 5, 1917; residence. Lake, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Ayres, Frederick, enlisted June 5, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to 150th Inf. Aug. 15, 1917. 
Althans, William A., enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Antra, John E., enlisted May 4, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Axton, Lee, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Lake, Ind.; trans, as 

Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 



BATTERY D 367 

Priyates 
Baise, Dewie, enlisted June 6 1917; resideince, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Blankenship, Fraiik E^ enlisted Sept. 28, 1917;. residence, Prov- 
idence, Ky.; traniS. as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 P. A.» Sept. 30, 1917. 
Bredenkamp, Fred W., enlisted Aug. 11, 1917; residence, Vvans- 

ville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Bruce, Arvel, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; trans, 

as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917; 
Buechler, Andrew, enlisted Aug. 2, 1917 ; residence, Evansville, Ind 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Bnickel, Lonis E^ enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Byers, Joe F^ enlisted July 18, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917; 
Bradshaw, Robert W^ enlisted Aug. 20, 1917; residence, Evans- 
ville, Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A, Sept. 30, 1917. 
Banks, James W^ enlisted Aug. 22,; 1917; residence. Madisonville, 

Ky.; trans, as Pvt. to Stip. Co., 139 F. A.; Sept. 30, 1917 
Barnett, Archie E., enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Sept. 30^ 1917. 
Barrick, Earl L^ enlisted Aug. 25, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 19il7: 
Cox, Arthur A^ enlisted May 7. 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Croseley, Mitford C, enlisted Aug. 20, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind. ; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Cox, Earl Jj"^ enlisted May 7, 1917; residence. Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Cartwrlprht, Bethel, enlisted July 18, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Clutter, RJley S., enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Cox, IVilliam S^ Jr^ enlisted May 27, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Cutteridffe, Burr >y., enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Evansville. 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
De Garis, Edwin P^ enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Dryer, Parley F^ enlisted Aug. 2, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Duty, Willie, enlisted Aug. 24, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Davis, Kenneth E^ enlisted Aug. 2, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Sup. Co., 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Eble, Frederick H^ enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Eckel, Herman J^ enlisted Aug. 21, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Flach, Gabriel C, enlisted July 2, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Fea|[?ley, Herbert F., enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Gaultney, Fleety, enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to 150th Inf., Aug. 15, 1917. 
Gentry, Carvel, enlisted Sept. 28, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Gentry, James H^ enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 



368 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Privates 

Grainger, Louis, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to 150th Ind., Aug. 15, 1917. 
Gibson, Cliarles T. ,enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Newburg, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Gann, George, enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Harris, Tliurman C^ enlisted May 4, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

trans.as Pvt. to Sup. Co., 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Hawkins, Cliester, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to 150th Inf., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Hall, Harry, enlisted Aug. 2, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; trans. 

as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Hardesty, Carl S^ enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Derby, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Hawkins, Robert F^ enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Hiley, Charles A^ enlisted Aug. 2, 1917; residence, Gentryville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A.. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Hill, Cecil Jf«, enlisted June 30, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to BM. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Holder, John N., enlisted June 30, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D. 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Ingram, Jfoah, enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Israel, Lee M., enlisted June 5, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A.. Sept. 30. 1917. 
Jackal, Walter A^ enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
James, Hugh, enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D; 139 F. A., Sept. 20, 1917. 
Johnson, jN^oble B,, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Johnson, Otis, enlisted July 4, 1917; residence. Boonville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Jones, Betram E^ enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Jones, Thomas, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Newberg, Ind.; 

.trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Jordan, Harrison, enlisted Sept. 11, 1917; residence. Evansville, 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Kennedy, William L., enlisted Aug. 20. 1917; residence, Grandview, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Killian, Frank H^ enlisted May 9, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Kirkpatrick, Walker W^ enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Evans- 
ville, Ind.; trains, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Lowe, Oryllle, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Madden, Elmer, enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Majors, Otho S., enlisted June 30, 1917; residence, Winslow, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Masters, Luther H.^ enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Marshall, Ira L^ enlisted July 18, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to Sup. Co., 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
McNeely, John H^ enlisted Sept. 4, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 



BATTERY D 369 

Privates 
Middletoii Archie A, enlisted May 4, 1917; residence, Boonville, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Miller, John V^ enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
3Iiller, William H^ enlisted Aug. 2, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Mitchell, Herman A^ enlisted Aug. 20, 1917; residence, Tennyson, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Montgomery, James A^ enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Boonville, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Murray, James E^ enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Nix, Ora G^ enlisted June 29, 1917; residence, Newberg, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Neth, Frank J^ enlisted June 30 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Neueller, Carl Y^ enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Overton, Isac, enlisted June 5, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to 150th F. A. Aug. 15, 1917. 
Posey, Noble, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Tennyson, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Bhoades, Clarence A^ enlisted July 18, 1917; residence, Boonville, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Rice, Farless C, enlisted Aug. 21, 1917; residence. Providence, Ky.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. ^ 
Rlsley, Thomas L^ enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Petersburg, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Roach, Homer, enlisted May 9, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Robinson, Otis J^ enlisted July 9, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Rocca, Gns P., enlisted June 9, 1917; residence,. Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30. 1917. 
Rogge, Edward H^ enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Rudd, Romay L^ enlisted Aug. 20, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Sandlin, John M^ enlisted May 25, 1917; residence, Molton, Ala.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Saunders, James D^ enlisted May 25, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Schuetz, Joseph H^ enlisted July 6, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Smith, Peter J^ enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Newberg, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Smith, Fred, enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Newberg, Ind.; trans. 

to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30. 1917. 
Smith, Chauncy M^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Stevens, Benjamin, enlisted June 5, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Steel, Lawrence, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Blackford, Ky.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Stephens, Herbert, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 



370 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Priyates 

Stone, David, enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Saltsmaii, William, enlisted May. 7, 1917; residence, Elderado, 111.; 

trans, to Sup. Co., 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Taylor, Homer W., enlisted Sept. 15, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Taylor, Koscoe, enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Tindle, James S^ enlisted Aug. 13, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Ulsomer, John M., enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Welch, Boy, enlisted June 19, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Wagner, Nicklaus C^ enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Walker, Harry C^ enlisted June 30, 1917 ; residence, Evansville, Ind. ; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Weber, Walter M^ enlisted May 5, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Weiskopf, Leo, enlisted June 9, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Williams, Charles M^ enlisted May 5, 1917; residence, Tennyson, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30. 1917. 
WUkerson, James H^ enlisted May 5, 1917; residence, Boonville, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Wilson, Harold, enlisted Aug. 30, 1917; residence, Inglesfield, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Wooldridge, Leslie, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Wooten, George E,, enlisted Aug. 2, 1917; residence, Terre Haute, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Young, Bennie E^ enlisted Aug. 20, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 



Company H, 4th Indiana Infantry 

Company H, 4th Indiana Infantry, was composed mainly 
of boys from Bartholomew County, but was also repre- 
sented by boys of the neighboring counties of Jennings, 
Brown, Johnson and Decatur. 

At the beginning of the war between the United States 
and Germany, some of the citizens of Bartholomew County, 
realizing that their county should be represented by a 
volunteer military organization, undertook to raise a 
company of infantry to be known as the Bartholomew 
County Volunteers. The organization of this unit was 
put into the hands of the Chamber of Commerce of Colum- 
bus, Indiana, which was fortunate enough at that time 
to have a very capable and competent secretary, Mr. 
John E. North way. Mr. North way was instrumental in 
appointing some committees composed of members of 
the Chamber of Commerce, whose duties were to form 
a company of infantry to go into a new regiment of the 
Indiana National Guard being formed at that time. 

A recruiting office was opened in the city of Columbus 
about the 15th of April, and Lieutenant D. N. Nutter, 
formerly of the Indiana National Guard, and Sergeant 
Floyd Anderson, of Company K, 1st Indiana Infantry, 
were placed in charge of the recruiting, while the differ- 
ent committees of the Chamber of Commerce looked after 
the finances, publicity and other affairs. After a most 
strenuous campaign of five or six weeks, enough signa- 
tures had been secured to warrant the calling of a mus- 
tering officer and an examining surgeon from the Indiana 
National Guard Headquarters to examine the prospective 
recruits and muster such as were able to pass the 



372 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

physical test, into the Indiana National Guard. These 
officers came to Columbus on May the 23rd and examined 
about sixty recruits, forty-five of whom passed the phys- 
ical test required and were sworn into the State service 
by Major P. A. Davis in the City Hall, before a large 
audience on the night of May 23rd. With the added help 
of the recruits sworn in, the campaign was renewed and 
new classes of candidates were examined and sworn in 
at intervals of from ten days to two weeks, until about 
July 1st the required 65 had been secured and the com- 
pany was recognized as Company H, 4th Indiana Infantry. 

During the period of forming this company, drills were 
held in the City Hall on two nights each week for the 
benefit of the recruits under the direction of Lieutenant 
D. N. Nutter, assisted by Sergeant Floyd Anderson and 
Emil T. Wagner, who had served on the Mexican Border 
with Company I, 1st Indiana Infantry. On July 7th, 
1917, Don Essex was commissioned Captain of Company 
H, and took active command. Sergeant Floyd Anderson 
was commissioned 2d Lieutenant and appointed muster- 
ing officer and work was continued in recruiting the 
company until August 5th. Under the order of the Pres- 
ident, the company mobilized at Columbus, Indiana, about 
one hundred strong. After mobilization, recruiting was 
continued and the drill of the company to fit them for 
the part they were to take in the great World War was 
begun. Drills were held daily in Commercial and Perry 
Parks. Road hikes were made each day and the work of 
converting citizens into soldiers was on in earnest. 

During the stay of the company in Columbus, it was 
quartered in the City Hall and was bounteously fed by 
the Ladies' Aid Society in the dining room in the base- 
ment of the Methodist Church, and the recollection of 



BATTERY D 373 

those glorious feeds was cherished by the members of 
Company H for many days afterward. The company was 
also entertained and treated to a picnic and dinner by 
the citizens of the Clifford neighborhood. This was 
enjoyed by the troops very much and incidentally gave 
our company doctor additional duties. The company was 
given its final physical examination, vaccinated and 
innoculated against smallpox and typhoid fever and was 
mustered into the U. S. service on August 10th, 1917, by 
Lieutenant Ross P. Baldwin of Seymour Indiana, with 
Don Essex as Captain, Floyd Anderson as 1st Lieutenant 
and Emil T. Wagner as 2d Lieutenant. While in Columbus, 
baseball games were played by teams composed of mem- 
bers of the company and different teams of the city. A 
small fee was charged to these games which went toward 
a company fund. 

A large farewell dinner and reception was tendered 
the company by the citizens of the County in Perry's 
Park and we had as guests the Commander of the 4th 
Indiana Regiment, Colonel Robert L. Moorhead, the Com- 
mander of the 2d Battalion of the Regiment, of which 
Company H was a part, Major Walter H. Unversaw and 
also our worthy Chaplain Brundage, who delivered a good 
talk. The band of the 4th Indiana Regiment was also 
present and furnished the musical part of the entertain- 
ment. The company was entrained for Fort Harrison, 
Indiana, on September 4th, where it went into camp with 
the other units of the Indiana National Guard. Here 
drilling and equipping were carried on until September 
25th, when it entrained with the rest of the regiment for 
Camp Shelby, Mississippi. Having arrived there on 
September 27th, it immediately got down to the real work 
of making soldiers out of raw recruits. 



374 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

But Company H was destined to be something other 
than infantry, as an order from the War Department had 
changed the 4th Indiana Infantry to heavy artillery and 
it was organized as such on October 1st, being known as 
the 139th Field Artillery. Company H was consolidated 
with Company G of Evansville, Indiana, which was com- 
manded by Captain Caleb K. Wheeler, 1st Lieutenant 
Henry N. O'Dell and 2d Lieutenant Charles J. Folz. The 
consolidation of the two companies into Battery D, 139th 
Field Artillery, made a membership larger than was 
required by a battery of artillery, so the surplus of non- 
commissioned officers was transferred in the grade they 
held, to the Headquarters Company, 139th Field Artillery. 
The surplus of privates was transferred to Battery E and 
to the Supply Company of the 139th Field Artillery. 

So ended the career of Company H, 4th Indiana 
Infantry. 

ROSTER OF COMPACT H, 4TH INDIANA INFANTRY 

Capt. Don Essex, commissioned July 7, 1917; residence, Columbus, 
Ind.; assigned as Adjt. 1st Battalion, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

1st Lieut. Floyd Anderson, commissioned Aug. 4, 1917; residence, 
Eliabethtown, Ind.; assigned 1st Lieut. Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 
30, 1917. 

2d Lieut. Emil T. Wagner, commissioned Aug. 4, 1917; residence, 
Columbus, Ind.; assigned 2d Lieut. Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 30, 1917. 

1st Sergt. Horace C. Boyd, enlisted May 23, 1917 ; residence, Columbus, 
Ind.; trans, to Hq. Co., 139 F. A., as 1st Sergt., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Mess Sergt. Clyde L. Wilson, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Scipio, 
Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Mess Sergt., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Sup. Sergt. George E. Perry, enlisted June 9, 1917; residence, Colum- 
bus, Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., and appointed 1st Sergt. 
Sept. 30, 1917. 

Sergt. Marion H. Amick, enlisted July 25, 1917; residence, Scipio, 
Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Sergt., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Sergt. Oliver Fawcett, enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Columbus, 
Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Sergt., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Sergt. Michael E. Herron, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Columbus, 
Ind.; trans, to Hq. Co., 139 F. A., as Sergt., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Sergt. Harry R. Lister, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Columbus, 
Ind. trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Sergt., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Sergt. Belmar R. Pittman, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Columbus, 
Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Sergt., Sept. 30, 1917. 

Sergt, Harry R, Smith, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Elizabeth- 
town, Ind.; trans, to Hq. Co., 139 F. A., as Sergt., Sept. 30, 1917. 



BATTERY D 375 

Corp. Earl Abbott, enlisted July 24, 1917; residence, Hope, Ind.; 

trans, to Hq. Co., 139 F. A., as Corp., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Thomas Butler, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Edinburg, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 P. A., as Corp., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Lee Cormaii, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Tylertown, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Corp., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Clarence H. Coyert, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Corp., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp, John H. Cook, enlisted July 25, 1917; residence, Hope, Ind.; 

trans, to Hq. Co., 139 F. A., as Corp., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Levi C. Elliott, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Corp., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. John C. Geilker, enlisted July 24, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; trans, to Hq. Co., 139 F. A., as Corp., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Guy D. Hamblen, enlisted June 18, 1917; residence, Edinburg, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Corp., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Francis 31. Hailsup, enlisted May 31, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; trans, to Hq. Co., 139 F. A., as Corp., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Loyd H. Mckerson, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Corp., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Fred Pancake, enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Clifford, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Corp., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. George H. Strock, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Corp., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Loyd Utter, enlisted May 31, 1917; residence, Hartsville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Corp., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Corp. Baymond Walker, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Franklin, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Corp., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Mech. Jesse C. Bozell, enlisted July 24, 1917; residence, Clifford, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Mech., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Mech. Walter R, Western, enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Mech., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Cook Francis E. Hull, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Cook, Sept. 30, 1917. 
Cook Simeon T. Stapp, enlisted July 25, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Cook, Sept. 30, 1917. 
Horseshoer Forest H. Huntsman, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, 

Columbus, Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Horseshoer, Sept. 

30, 1917. 
Horseshoer Henry R, Smith, enlisted Aug. 30, 1917; residence, Green- 
ville, N. C; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Horseshoer, Sept. 30, 1917. 
Saddler Clarence H. Zeigler, enlisted Sept. 25, 1917; residence, Hope, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Saddler, Sept. 30, 1917. 
Bugler Ora S. Downs, enlisted June 26, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Bugler, Sept. 30, 1917. 
Bugler Fred J. Mourey, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Elizabeth- 
town, Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Privates 
Allen, Woody H., enlisted July 24, 1917; residence, Jonesville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Albert, Carl, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Anderson, Frank P., enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Archambault, Leo, enlisted Aug. 17, 1917; residence, Nashville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Ault, Alfred L., enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 



376 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Privates 
Adams, Herbert C^ enlisted June 19, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; trans, to Sup. Co.. 139 F. A., as Pvt.. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Barker, Ernest, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Elizabethtown. 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D. 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Barr, Chester R,, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Elizabethtown, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Barr, Iforval, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Elizabethtown, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Beeker, Albert L^ enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Baker, Adrew J^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Sup. Co., 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Baker, Charles, enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Sup. Co., 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30. 1917. 
Banister, Dave, enlisted June 18, 1917; residence, Scipio, Ind.; 

trans, to 150th F. A., as Pvt., Aug. 15. 1917. 
Baker, Robert L^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Sup. Co., 139 F. A., as Pvt.. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Borders, Flodie, enlisted July 3, 1917; residence, Clear Springs, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Brand, Keller, enlisted May 23. 1917; residence, Elizabethtown, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Bedffood, Lee, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence. Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30. 1917. 
Calhonn, Homer, enlisted Aug. 10, 1917; residence, Hope, Ind.; trans. 

to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt.. Sept 30, 1917. 
Cavanangh, Harry, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; trans, to 150th F. A., as Pvt., Aug. 15, 1917. 
Carr, Chester W^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Elizabethtown, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Clayton, Walter, enlisted June 25, 1917; residence, Queensville, 

Ind.; trans, to 150th F. A., as Pvt,, Sept, 15, 1917, 
Colvin, Harry, enlisted Aug, 4, 1917; residence, Elizabethtown, Ind,; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt.. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Cook, Alvin, enlisted Aug. 30, 1917; residence. La Porte, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Cooper, Loren, enlisted July 16, 1917; residence, Hope, Ind.; trans. 

to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30. 1917. 
Crane, Clarence, enlisted June 26, 1917; residence, Jonesville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Despaln, Fred, enlisted July 3, 1917; residence, Edinburg, Ind.; 

trans, to 150th F. A., as Pvt., Aug. 15. 1917. 
Despain, Herbert, enlisted July 3, 1917; residence, Edinburg, Ind.; 

trans, to 150th F. A., as Pvt, Sept. 30, 1917. 
Dickinson, Earl, enlisted June 16, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat, D, 139 F, A, as Pvt., Aug. 15, 1917. 
Esteb, Elmo, enlisted Aug. 18, 1917; residence, Greenwood, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30. 1917. 
Gaffney, Joseph, enlisted Aug, 1, 1917; residence. Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat D, 139 F, A„ as Pvt., Sept, 30, 1917, 
GIberson, Guy C, enlisted Sept. 17, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A„ as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
GIberson, John, enlisted July 25, 1917; resid'^nce. Columbus. Ind.; 

trans, to Bat D, 139 F. A., as Pvt,, Sept, 30. 1917, 
Gibson, Henry J^ enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind,; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Gross, Otto R„ enlisted Aug. 4. 1917; residence. Columbus, Ind.: 

trans, to Hq. Co.. 139 F. A., as Pvt.. Sept. 30, 1917. 



BATTERY D 377 



Priyates 
• Green, Charles G., enlisted July 30, 1917; residence, Franklin, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Greenlee, Cecil E,, enlisted July 25, 1917; residence. Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Huddleston, Edward, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Edinburg, 

Ind.; trans, to 150th F. A., as Pvt., Aug. 15, 1917. 
Hayes, Billie, enlisted Aug. 14, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F .A., as Pvt, Sept. 30. 1917. 
Handley, Dewey, enlisted Aug. 20, 1917; residence, Edinburg, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Harden, Weber, enlisted Aus. 1, 1917; residence. Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Havron, Gordon D., enlisted June 26. 1917; residence. Columbus, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D. 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Henderson, George W., enlisted July 30, 1917; residence, Franklin, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Henderson, Oscar P^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Taylorsville. 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Henry, Austin, enlisted June 11, 1917; residence. On:ilville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30. 1917. 
Henry, Chris, enlisted May 31, 1917; residence. Scipio, Ind.; trans. 

to Bat. D. 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Hitchcock, Walter S- enlisted Sept. 10, 1917; residence, Hope. Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Jolliff, Luther T^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Keller, Grover, enlisted May 31, 1917; residence, Hartsville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Lonj?, George, enlisted June 16, 1917; residence, Eliabethtown, Ind.; 

trans, to 150th F. A., as Pvt., Aug. 15, 1917. 
Lawrence, Kenneth N,, enlisted Aug. 13, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt, Sept 30, 1917. 
Leeson, Walter, enlisted Aug. 14, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept 30, 1917. 
Little, Herman, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence. Eliabethtown. Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Mullis, LeRov. enlisted July 25, 1917; residence, Columbus. Ind.; 

trans, to 150th F. A., as Pvt, Aug. 15, 1917. 
Maples, William, enlisted June 26, 1917; residence. Clear Springs, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat D, 139 F. A., as Pvt, Sept 30, 1917. 
Marshall, Charles S^ enlisted May 31, 1917; residence, Columbus, 
. Ind.; trans, to Bat D. 139 F. A., as Pvt, Sept. 30, 1917. 
Mason, Beniamin S., enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.: trans, to Bat D, 139 F. A., as Pvt, Sept 30, 1917. 
Mc Williams, Ira S,, enlisted Aug. 27, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat D, 139 F. A., as Pvt, Sept. 30, 1917. 
McCoy, Sam, enlisted Aug. 10, 1917; residence. Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Sup. Co., 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Miller, Dewey^ enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept 30, 1917. 
Miller, Earl 'N^ enlisted July 25, 1917; residence, Hope. Ind.; trans. 

to Bat. D. 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept 30 1917. 
Morrison, Robert B., enlisted Aug. 13, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt.. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Iforton, Raymond, enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Clifford, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept 30, 1917. 
Oliver, Ora, enlisted Aug. 10, 1917; residence, Hartsville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
25 



378 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Priyates 

Owens, Georj?e E., enlisted Aug. 10, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30. 1917. 
Patterson, Earl, enlisted June 4, 1917; residence, Needham, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Payne, Cecil, enlisted Sept. 11, 1917; residence, Brownstown, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt, Sept. 30, 1917. 
Perry, Charles E,, enlisted Aug. 27. 1917; residence. Hope, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt, Sept. 30, 1917. 
Perry, Ray C^ enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Hope, Ind.; trans. 

to Bat D. 139 F. A., as Pvt Sept. 30. 1917. 
Pritchard, Bryan, enlisted Aug. 17, 1917; residence, Edinburg, Ind.; 

trans, to Hq. Co., 139 F. A., as Pvt.. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Query, Bernard, enlisted May 31, 1917; residence, Edinburg, Ind.; 

trans, to Sup. Co., 139 F. A., as Pvt, Sept 30, 1917. 
Richards, Jerry L^ enlisted May 31, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt, Sept 30, 1917. 
Ross, Fred, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Jonesville, Ind.; trans. 

to 150th F. A., as Pvt., Aug. 15. 1917. 
Reeves, Charles, enlisted July 25, 1917; residence, Nashville, Ind.; 

trans, to 150th F. A., as Pvt., Aug. 15, 1917.. 
Robertson, Dewey, enlisted Aug. 13„ 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept 30, 1917. 
Romine, Walter S^ enlisted Sept. 25, 1917; residence, Hope, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept 30, 1917. 
Rush, Ray, enlisted May 31, 1917; residence, Flat Rock, Ind.; trans. 

to Bat D. 139 F. A., as Pvt. Sept. 30, 1917. 
Seward, Forest, enlisted Sept. 13, 1917; residence, Hope, Ind.; trans. 

to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt.. Sept 30. 1917. 
Shattock, Fred^ enlisted June 19, 1917; residence, Elizabethtown, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Shaw, Clarence, enlisted June 4, 1917; residence. Flat Rock, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt, Sept 30, 1917. 
Smith, Russell, enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Vernon, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept 30, 1917. 
Spicer, Harley D^ enlisted July 30, 1917; residence, Franklin, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt, Sept 30, 1917. 
Smith, Sarnie C, enlisted June 4, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat D, 139 F. A., as Pvt, Sept. 30, 1917. 
Stewart, G«orge T^ enlisted April 15, 1917; residence, Hartsville, 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. from Co. D, 4th Ind. Inf., to Co. H, 4th Ind. 

Inf., Aug. 13, 1917; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F A, as Pvt Sept. 30, 1917. 
Stribling, Herbert, enlisted June 4, 1917; residence, Burney, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt, Sept 30. 1917. 
Summers, Charles E^ enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Swiggett, William, enlisted Aug. 15, 1917; residence, Edinburg, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Thompson, Oscar M^ enlisted Aug. 23, 1917; residence, Ogilville, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept 30, 1917. 
Thurston, Clifford, enlisted June 11, 1917; residence, Burney, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept 30, 1917. 
Wagner, Harry B^ enlisted Sept. 17, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt, Sept 30, 1917. 
Walters, Joseph W^ enlisted July 30, 1917; residence, Franklin, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept 30, 1917. 
Western, Wardell, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 



BATTERY D 379 

Privates 

White, Clay C^ enlisted Aug. 30, 1917; residence, Hartsville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Wilber, Korral N^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Elizabethtown, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Weisenburg, Lynns 0^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Wilber, Cleveland, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Elizabethtown, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Williams, Carrol C^ enlisted Sept. 1, 1917; residence, Colfax, 111.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Williams, Clarence, E., enlisted June 19, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Williams, William R., enlisted Sept. 1, 1917; residence, Colfax, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt, Sept. 30, 1917. 
Wolf, Carl R^ enlisted Sept. 3, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Wright, Alonzo J^ enlisted Aug. 13, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 
Teley, Archie L^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Elizabethtown, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. D. 139 F. A., as Pvt., Sept. 30, 1917. 




CAPTAIN ROSS E. WATSON 



Battery D, 139th Field Artillery 

Battery D, 139th Field Artillery, was organized at 
Camp Shelby, Mississippi, on October 1st, 1917, by the 
consolidation of Company G of Evansville, and Company 
H of Columbus, Indiana, from the 4th Indiana Infantry. 
Its officers were Captain Caleb K. Wheeler, 1st Lieu- 
tenants Henry N. Odell and Floyd Anderson, and 2d 
Lieutenants Charles J. Folz and Emil T. Wagner. 

After organization was completed, the work of con- 
verting infantry into artillery was begun. The officers 
and enlisted men were handicapped from the start by not 
having the proper drill regulations and by the absence 
of any kind of artillery materiel with which to work. 
The first artillery drills of the battery were held around 
boards nailed together and laid on the ground to rep- 
resent the carriages, caissons and limbers of a piece. 
About this time the battery had four U. S. Reserve 
artillery lieutenants attached to it, who were to help 
the regular officers in the instruction of the enlisted men 
of the battery. During the month of October the facil- 
ities for drilling were somewhat improved when the 
battery mechanics made some wooden cannon by using 
wheels from combat wagons, and logs to represent the 
tubes, while axles and caisson chests were made from 
scrap lumber. With these wooden cannon, gun drill was 
carried on each day. In accordance with orders issued 
by the War Department, a regiment of heavy field artil- 
lery was armed with rifles, so we were issued the Spring- 
field rifles that had formerly been the property of the 
3rd Indiana Infantry, and drilling in the manual of arms 
was taken up. 



382 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

The ranks of the battery having been depleted by trans- 
fers to the MiHtary Police and other branches of the 
service, the battery was brought back to war strength 
by an increment of the first drafted men, seven in number, 
who came from Camp Taylor, Kentucky, on October 17th. 
These men were all from Indiana. 

The first tables of organization also called for the battery 
to be horse-drawn and Battery D received its first horses 
during the early part of its existence as a battery. Horses 
were added at intervals until the battery was the "possessor 
of ten horses at one time" and the drill of teching the 
men to ride, harness and care for the horses was continued 
until about the middle of December, when another table 
of organization came out which changed the heavy artil- 
lery into tractor-drawn instead of horse-drawn. So the 
work of caring for horses and harness, and riding and 
driving was discontinued and the men with motor exper- 
ience were started to school, where they were instructed 
in the mysteries of gasoline motors and trucks. 

In the early part of the battery's existence special 
schools for gas defense, bayonet fighting and training of 
non-commissioned officers in the artillery work was taken 
up. Classes of "non-coms'' were sent to these schools 
and to the 4th Field Artillery, which at that time was 
mountain artillerj^ It was commonly called the "Jack-ass 
Battery," because the cannon, small 2.95-inch pieces, were 
carried on the backs of mules. 

The officers were also required to take these courses. 
None of these courses, except the gas course, was of much 
benefit to the battery because the bayonet was soon dis- 
carded from the artillery and the drills of the "Mountain 
Battery" could not be applied to heavy field artillery. 
During the month of November, 1917, details from the 



BATTERY D 383 

battery were sent to the combat range to assist in the 
construction of artillery emplacements and dug-outs. Two 
miles of communication trenches, connecting battery and 
battalion positions, were constructed just as they were 
to be constructed for use in actual warfare. In all three 
different positions, temporary, semi-permanent and perma- 
nent, were included dug-outs that were as much as forty 
feet underground, ammunition pits fifteen feet under- 
ground and gun emplacements for three batteries of 12 
guns. This work continued with the help of the engineers 
and details from all the artillery organizations of the 
63rd Field Artillery Brigade, through the winter and into 
the spring of 1918. 

Thanksgiving and Christmas of 1917 were celebrated by 
the battery in a very appropriate fashion by an unusually 
big feed. Christmas was made more realistic by the 
addition of a Christmas tree adorned with presents, and 
by a short program that was carried out by a number 
of the men for the entertainment of the battery. 

In the spring of 1918 the 139th Field Artillery became 
the proud possessor of two 4.7-inch howitzers, American 
guns, and for the first time, the batteries were able to 
conduct regular artillery drills, having about one hour's 
drill each day. It was impossible to obtain ammunition 
for these guns at this time and none was secured until 
about the middle of the summer, but when ammunition 
was available the gun crews of the battery soon demon- 
strated that they would be able to give an excellent 
account of themselves if ever given the opportunity. 

A great deal of difficulty was experienced in obtaining 
woollen uniforms for the battery in the winter of 1917 
and 1918. Nothing could be secured except small blouses 
and large breeches, so the small men had blouses and the 



384 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

large ones had breeches, while the middle-sized men were 
**fortunate" in securing both. Overcoats were likewise 
scarce and none were to be had until late in the winter. 
This winter was rather severe, the temperature going 
as low as ten degrees above zero at one time. Camp 
Shelby being a tented camp, this was severe weather, 
but each tent was supplied with a box frame and floor 
and each had a stove in it, and as pine knots were plenti- 
ful, the men were able to keep comfortably warm. 

There were very few days, all through the winter 
months, that drills were not carried on. During the latter 
part of February and early March, the battery, together 
with the regiment, went to Rifle Range A for target- 
practice. Some excellent scores resulted, considering that 
we had the old Springfield rifles that had been used in 
the Indiana National Guard for several years, and that 
the 3rd Infantry had had them in service on the Mexican 
border. The regiment made the highest general average 
of any regiment at Shelby and the battery stood third 
in the regiment. During June the Springfield rifles were 
taken up and the new U. S. Enfield model issued. The 
regiment again hiked to the range with these rifles but 
did not make as high a score as it formerly made with 
the Springfield model. 

During May, orders were received for the regiment to 
supply 420 men for replacement troops. This number 
was drawn, each battery furnishing its quota, according 
to its strength. Battery D had to furnish as its share 
67 men, and it was quite a task to pick them as everyone 
was eager to go, but the orders were to pick the men so 
that it would not cripple the organization. Men that 
were not assigned to the gun squads or truck service were 
selected as far as possible. These men were transferred 




I i^M. 



'i'Uivr, \lau-ons {XV* siecie). ,\D..Fhvl 



386 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

on June 4, 1918, and left soon afterward for overseas. 
By reading the remarks after each man's name in the 
battery roster, the lucky ones can be determined. An 
examination was also made during May to determine 
who were unfit for overseas service, and Battery D had 
ten men who were unfortunate enough to be classed as 
physically unable for such service, and these ten men 
were transferred to the U. S. Guards on June 11. 

On May 29th, 30th and 31st, and June 1st and 2d, the 
regiment took the memorable ''Decoration Hike" to Lum- 
berton, Mississippi, leaving camp Wednesday noon and 
returning Sunday noon, having staid in Lumberton from 
Thursday evening until Saturday morning. During this 
hike of sixty-five miles in three marching days, Battery 
D made an excellent record, having marched seven miles 
farther than any other battery in the regiment, and not 
having a single man to fall out, or ride in the ambulance 
during the entire trip. 

Owing to the transfer of the men to the replacement 
troops and to the U. S. Guards and owing to the dis- 
charges that had been made, the battery's ranks had been 
depleted until we had only 125 men, so the work of filling 
up the battery with the drafted men was commenced, 
and the first detachment, 26 men, practically all from 
Illinois, was received on June 18. Then the work of 
drilling these recruits began anew. The next bunch of 
23 was received from the Detention Camp of Camp Shelby, 
Mississippi, on August 23rd, and all were from the 
Southern States — Alabama, Mississippi, Florida, Arkansas 
and Louisiana. By mixing these men with the old men 
of the battery they were soon able to make a very 
creditable showing. 



388 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

During the latter part of August, 1918, another order 
from the War Department changed the arms of the heavy 
artillery from rifles to pistols, and the rifles having been 
taken up, a few pistols were issued, but the battery was 
never fully equipped. The first of September brought 
what the battery had been longing for through twelve 
months of unceasing toil. This was orders for oversea 
service and the first members to leave were Lieutenant 
Floyd Anderson, Mechanics Western and Bozell and 
Private Hiley, who were sent in an advance detail and 
left Camp Shelby September 9th, 1918. The battery, 
together with the rest of the regiment, left Camp Shelby 
on September 19th, arriving at Camp Upton, L. I., Sep- 
tember 21st, where they were equipped for overseas 
service by the addition of steel helmets and the exchange 
of campaign hats for overseas caps, russet shoes for hob- 
nails, and summer underwear for winter. The batterj^ 
sailed from New York on October 6th, on the English 
steamer "Cedric," arrived at Liverpool October 17th, and, 
leaving there the same date, arrived on the 21st of 
October at Camp Codford. The troops crossed the English 
Channel from Southampton to Cherbourg, France, thence 
to Ploermel, arriving there on October 25th. The battery 
was quartered in old buildings during their stay at 
Ploermel, and after a few encounters by some members 
of the battery with the red wine of the country, they left 
for Camp de Meucon on November 9th, where they 
joined the members of the Advance School Detail. During 
the stay of the battery at Camp de Meucon, the regiment 
was issued 155mm. howitzers, the guns with which we 
were to be armed on the front. But our hopes of ever 
using them against the Germans were shattered by the 
signing of the Armistice on November 11th. However, 



BATTERY D 389 

we had the satisfaction of demonstrating to the officers 
of this school that we could have delivered the goods, had 
we been given the chance, by showing a pretty exhibition 
of howitzer firing. 

The battery left Camp de Meucon on November 30th 
for Brest, France, with orders to embark for the United 
States. While there the battery, with the regiment, took 
part in the reception to President Wilson. We sailed on 
the steamer "George Washington'' on December 15th, and 
arrived without incident at Hoboken, December 23rd. We 
immediately entrained, for Camp Merritt, where Christmas 
Eve and Christmas Day were spent in the very interesting 
process of "delousing." But I can truthfully say that this 
process was unnecessary as Battery D and cooties had 
never had any intimate acquaintance and the harvest was 
nil. The battery received new clothing and blankets for 
their old ones and the job of waiting for transportation 
to Fort Benjamin Harrison began. New Year's was 
ushered in with the battery still at Camp Merritt. 

Battery D, with the rest of the regiment, left Camp 
Merritt on January 5th, stopping at various points on the 
way to be served with coffee and sandwiches by the 
generous Red Cross ladies. At Cleveland, Ohio, we exer- 
cised our somewhat chilled and road-weary bodies by 
giving a parade through the main part of town, after 
which we returned to our Pullmans and retired. On 
awakening the following morning we were delighted to 
see the old camping site and Fort Benjamin Harrison, 
where we had first learned soldiering, early in the month 
of September, 1917. We were billetted here in frame 
barracks for a number of days, and after having gone 
through several formalities were finally mustered out of 
the United States service on the 15th day of January, 1919. 





1ST LT. FLOYD ANDERSON 
Commanding Battery 

2ND LT. ROBERT F. FINCHER 



1ST LT. CHAS. E. QUENTEL 
2ND LT. CHAS. J. FOLZ 



BATTERY D 391 



ROSTER OF BATTERY D, 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Capt. Caleb K. Wheeler, commissioned July 14, 1917; residence, Evans- 

ville, Ind,; trans, and assigned as Capt. of Inf., .Oct. 4, 1918. 
Capt. Ross E. Watson, commissioned May 10, 1918; residence, Marion, 

Ind.; assigned to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Nov. 22, 1918. 
1st Lieut, Henry Ji^. OTlell, commissioned July 17, 1917; residence, 

Eyansville, Ind.; assigned to Sup. Co., 139 F. A., Dec. 20, 1917. 
1st Lieut. Floyd Anderson, commissioned Aug. 4, 1917; residence, 

Elizabethtown, Ind. 
2d Lieut. Emil T. Wa^er, commissioned Aug. 4, 1917; residence, 

Columbus, Ind.; promoted to 1st Lieut., F. A., Feb. 12, 1918; 

assigned to Hq. Co., 139 F. A., Feb. 15, 1918. 
2d Lieut. Charles J. Folz, commissioned July 17, 1917; residence, 

Evansville, Ind.; assigned to Aero Squadron April 8, 1918; assigned 

to Bat^ D, 139 F. A., Dec. 5, 1918. 
1st Ser^. Ureorge E. Ferry, enlisted June 9, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind. 
Mess Sergt. Clyde L. Wilson, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Scipio, 

Ind.; trans, to O. T. C. Jan. 12, 1918, as Sergt; trans, to Bat. D, 

139 F. A., as Sergt.. April 18, 1918 
Sup Sergt. Charles W. Helyerson, enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, 

Evansville, Ind.; from Sup. Sergt. to Sergt. Feb. 24, 1918; trans. 

to M. G. Training Center Camp, Hancock, Ga., June 13, 1918. 
Sergt. Marion, H. Amick, enlisted July 25, 1917; residence, Scipio, 

Ind.; appointed Stable Sergt. Oct. 1, 1917; trans, to O. T. C, Leon 

Springs, Tex., Jan. 12, 1918, as Sergt.; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., 

April 18, 1918; trans, to O. T. C, Camp Shelby, Miss., June 6, 1918. 
Sergt. Marion S. Cornell, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Evansville. 

Ind.; trans, to O. T. C, Leon Springs, Tex., Jan. 12, 1918., as Sergt.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., as Sergt., April 12, 1918; trans, to 

O. T. C, Camp Shelby, Miss., as Sergt, June 6, 1918. 
Sergt. Oliver Fawcett, enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; trans, to Hq. Co., 139 F. A., July, 1918. 
Sergt Earl A. Ivy, enlisted July 26, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

reduced to Pvt. Nov. 3, 1917; trans, to U. S. Guards, as Pvt., 

June 11, 1918. 
Sergt. Harry R, Lister, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind. 
Sergt. Lester R, McCool, enlisted July 21, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; from Sergt. to Sup. Sergt. Feb. 24, 1918. 
Sergt. Delmar R, Pittman, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind. 
Sergt. Marcus F. Simon, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind. 
Sergt, Clifford H. Stratton, enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Evans- 
ville, Ind. 
Sergt. Earl Y„ Wilhelm, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind. 
Sergt. Floyd W. Williams, enlisted May 5, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; trans, to O. T. C, Camp Shelby, Miss., June 6, 1918, as Sergt.; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., June 22, 1918. 
Corp Ottry Birge, enlisted July 20, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

promoted to Sergt. July 12, 1918. 
Corp. Oswald R. Blum, enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; reduced to Pvt. April 8, 1918; trans, as Pvt. to June Replace- 
ment Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Corp. Thomas Butler, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Edinburg, Ind. 
Corp. John F. Burton, enlisted June 5, 1917; residence. Evansville, 

Ind.; reduced to Pvt. Nov. 3, 1917; appointed Bugler Feb. 26, 1918. 



3^2 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Corp. Edward C. Castle, enlisted June 30, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; reduced to Pvt. Dec. 27, 1917; trans, to June Replacement 

Detachment, as Pvt., June 4, 1918. 
Corp. Charles A. Collins, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Boonville, 

Ind.; reduced to Pvt. Dec. 27, 1917; trans, to June Replacement 

Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Corp. Lee Corman, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Tylertown, Miss.; 

reduced to Pvt. Sept. 18, 1918; promoted to Corp. Nov. 24, 1918. 
Corp. Clarence H. Covert, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind. 
Corp. Harry Cox, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

promoted to Sergt. Nov. 18, 1917. 
Corp. Herndon C. Doyle, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; reduced from Corp. to 1 cl. Pvt. May 8. 1918; trans, to 

June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Corp. Levi H. Elliott, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind. 
Corp. Guy D. Hamblen, enlisted June 18, 1917; residence, Edinburg, Ind. 
Corp. Frederick Krause, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; reduced from Corp. to 1 cl. Pvt. May 9, 1918; trans, to June 

Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Corp. Arthur Musgrave, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Mt. Carmel, 

111.; reduced from Corp. to 1 cl. Pvt. May 9, 1918; trans, to June 

Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Corp. Loyd H. Nickerson, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; promoted to Sergt. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Corp. Fred Pancake, enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Clifford, Ind. 
Corp. Walter M. Schaum, enlisted June 5, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind. 
Corp. William Schriek, enlisted May 4, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; reduced from Corp. to 1 cl. Pvt. May 9, 1918; trans, to June 

Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Corp. George H. Strock, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind. 
Corp. Harry F. Traylor, enlisted May 24, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind. 
Corp. Loyd Utter, enlisted May 31, 1917; residence, Hartsville, Ind. 
Corp. Raymond Walker, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Franklin, 

Ind.; reduced to Pvt. Nov. 17, 1917; trans, to June Replacement 

Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Corp. Floyd W. Wilder, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence. Newburg, Ind.; 

reduced to Pvt. April 8, 1918; trans, to U. S. Guards June 11, 1918. 
Mech. Walter R. Western, enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; appointed Chief Mech., Eat. D, July 15, 1918; trans, to 

Advance School Detachment Sept. 8, 1918; trans, to Bat. D, 139 

F. A., Nov. 11, 1918. 
Mech. Jesse Bozell, enlisted July 24, 1917; residence. Clifford. Ind.; 

appointed Chief Mech. Sept. 1. 1918; trans, to Advance Detachment 

Sept. 8, 1918; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A.. Nov. 11, 1918. 
Mech. Emery R. Gleason, enlisted May 7, 1917; rps'dence, Madill. Okla. 
Mech. Allen A. Patterson, enlisted July 20. 1917; residence, Evans- 
ville, Ind. 
Cook Francis E. Hull, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind. 
Cook William 1). Hunt, enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Mt. Verndn. 

Ind.; promoted to Mess Sergt. July 12. 1918. 
Cook Simeon T. St«;>p, enlisted July 25, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind. 
Cook Anthone Rego, enlisted June 5, 1917; residence, Vincennes, Ind.; 

trans, to Labor Co., Camp Mills, L. I., June 11, 1917; trans, to 

Bat. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 26, 1918. 



BATTERY D 393 

HorsesJIioer James E. Allen, enlisted June 5, 1917; residence, New- 
burg, Ind.; appointed Mech. from H. S. May 1, 1918. 

Horseshoer Forest Huntsman, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Ogil- 
ville, Ind.; discharged April 12, 1918. 

Horseshoer Henry R. Smith, enlisted Aug. 30, 1917; residence, Green- 
ville, N. C; trans, to Vet. Corps Dec. 6, 1917. 

Horseshoer Oscar St. Clair, enlisted June 5, 1917; residence, Evans- 
ville, Ind.; reduced to Pvt. Nov. 22, 1917; trans, to June Replace- 
ment Detachment June 4, 1918. 

Saddjer Clarence E, Zeigler, enlisted Sept. 25, 1917; residence, Hope, 
Ind. 

Bugler Clyde R, Hammond, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Rockport, 
Ind.; trans, to Hq. Co., 139 F. A., June 28, 1918. 

Bugler Ora S. Downs, enlisted June 26, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind. 

Bugler Louis E. Wattum, enlisted May 4, 1917; residence, Evansville, 
Ind.; reduced to Pvt. Feb. 26, 1918; trans, to U. S. Guards June 
11, 1918. 

Priyates 

Abshier, James W^ enlisted June 5, 1917; residence. Lake, Ind.; 

appointed 1 cl. Pvt. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Allen, Woody H., enlisted July 24, 1917; residence, Jonesville, Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Albert, Carl, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

appointed 1 cl. Pvt. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Althaus, William A^ enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; appointed 1 cl. Pvt. Nov. 1, 1917; trans, to June Replacement 

Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Anderson, Frank P., enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Archambault, Leo, enlisted Aug. 17, 1917; residence, Nashville, Ind.; 

appointed 1 cl. Pvt. Nov. 1, 1918; trans, to June Replacement 

Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Ault, Alfred L^ enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Antra, John E^ enlisted May 4, 1917; residence, Boonyille, Ind.; 

trans, to 313th Remount Depot Dec. 1, 1917. 
^ Axton, Lee, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Lake, Ind.; trans, to 

June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Baise, Dewie, enlisted June 6, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

discharged March 5, 1918. 
Barker, Ernest, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Elizabethtown, Ind.; 

appointed 1 cl. Pvt. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Barr, Chester R., enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Elizabethtown, 

Ind.; appointed 1 cl. Pvt. Nov. 1, 1917; promoted to Corp. Sept. 

1, 1918. 
Barr, Jforval, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Elizabethtown, Ind.; 

appointed 1 cl. Pvt. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Beeker, Albert L., enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind-; 

appointed 1 cl. Pvt. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Blankenshlp, Frank E^ enlisted Sept. 28, 1917 ; residence. Providence, 

Ky.; discharged Jan. 28, 1918. 
Brand, Keller, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Elizabethtown, Itid.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Bredenkamp, Fred W., enlisted Aug. 11, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; trans, to U. S. Guards June 11, 1918. , 
Bruce, Arvel, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 1, 1918. 

26 



394 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Privates 
Buechler, Andrew, enlisted Aug. 2, 1918; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Buickel, Louis M^ enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; trans, to June Replacement 

Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Byers, Joe F., enlisted July 18, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918, 
Bradshaw, Robert W., enlisted Aug. 20, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; in desertion from Oct. 19, 1917, to Feb. 8, 1918; trans, to 

Development Battalion June 22, 1918. 
Bedgood, Lee E^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Hq. 63rd F. A. Brigade Oct. 27, 1917; trans, to Bat. D, 

139 F. A., as Pvt. 1 cl., Jan. 3, 1918; promoted to Corp July 12, 1918. 
Calhoun, Homer, enlisted Aug. 10, 1917; residence, Hope, Ind.; 

appointed Wag. Sept. 11, 1918. 
Carr, Cliester W., enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Elizabethtown, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Cartwriglit, Bethel, enlisted July 18, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Clutter, EHey S^ enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; promoted Corp. July 12, 1918. 
Colvin, Harry S., enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Elizabethtown, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1. 1917; trans, to U. S. Guards 

June 11, 1918. 
Cook, Alvin, enlisted Aug. 30, 1917; residence, Laporte, Ind,; trans. 

to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Cooper, Loren, enlisted July 16, 1917; residence, Hope, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Cox, Earl N., enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to M. P.'s Oct. 8, 1917; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Nov. 5, 

1917; trans, to 313th Remount Depot Dec. 1, 1917. 
Cox, William S^ Jr^ enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Crane, Clarence, enlisted June 26, 1917; residence, Jonesville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Crossley, Mitford C^ enlisted Aug. 20, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Cntterid,ge, Burr W^ enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917. 
DeGaris, Edwin P^ enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; trans, to June Replacement 

Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Dickenson, Earl, enlisted June 19, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Dryer, Purley F^ enlisted Aug. 2, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; promoted to Corp. April 8, 1918; 

trans, to Adj. Dept. Hq. Aug. 29, 1918. 
Duty, Willie, enlisted Aug. 24, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; dis- 
charged April 26, 1918. 
Eckel, Herman J., enlisted Aug. 21, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to U. S. Guards June 11, 1918. 
Flach, Gabriel C^ enlisted July 2, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Gaffney, Joseph, enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; reduced to Pvt. April 9, 1918; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 



BATTERY D 395 



Gann, George, enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

in desertion from Oct. 19, 1917, to Jan. 4, 1918; dishonorably dis- 
charged March 15, 1918. 
Gentry, Carrel, enlisted Sept. 28, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; trans, to Hospital, Camp Merritt, 

N. J., Jan. 4, 1919. 
Gentry, James H^ enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Giberson, Guy C^ enlisted Sept. 17, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind. 
Giberson, John, enlisted July 25, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

discharged April 4, 1918. 
Gibson, Charles T^ enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Newburg, Ind.; 

trans, to Development Battalion June 22, 1918. 
Gibson, Henry J., enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Sup. Co., 139 F. A., Nov. 22, 1917. 
Green, Charles G^ enlisted July 30, 1917; residence, Franklin, Ind. 
Greenlee, Cecil R^ enlisted July 25, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Hall, Harry, enlisted Aug. 2, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; trans. 

to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Handly, Dewey, enlisted Aug. 20, 1917; residence, Edinburg, Ind.; 

appointed Wag. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Harden, Weber, enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; trans, to 113th M. P.s June 18, 

1918. 
Hardesty, Carl S^ enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Lake, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Havron, Gordon D^ enlisted June 26, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; appointed Cook Sept. 13, 

1918. 
Hawkins, Robert F^ enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; promoted to Corp. April 8, 

1918. 
Henderson, Chris, enlisted May 7, 1917; residence. Lake, Ind.; dis- 
charged Feb. 7, 1918. 
Henderson, George W,, enlisted July 30, 1917; residence, Franklin, 

Ind.; trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Henderson, Oscar P^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Taylorville, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; trans, to Development 

Battalion Aug. 29, 1918. 
Henry, Austin, enlisted June 11, 1917; residence, Ogilville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Henry, Chris, enlisted May 31, 1917; residence, Scipio,^ Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; trans, to Advance School Detach- 
ment Sept. 8, 1918; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Nov. 11, 1918. 
Hill, Cecil Jf„ enlisted June 30, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; promoted to Corp. July 12, 1918. 
Hitchcock, Walter S^ enlisted Sept. 10, 1917; residence, Hope, Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Holder, John J^ enlisted June 30, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

promoted to Corp. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Ingram, N^oah, enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Israel, Lee M^ enlisted June 5, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; appointed Wag. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Jackie, Walter A., enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
James, Hugh, enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4. 1918. 



396 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Privates 
Johnson, Jfoble R, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Johnson, Otis, enlisted July 4, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Jolliff, Luther T^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind. ; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; appointed Wag. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Jones, Bertram E., enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; trans, to June Replacement 

Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Jones, Thomas, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Newburg, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Dec. 1, 1918. 
Jordon, Harrison, enlisted Sept. 11, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

discharged Nov. 15, 1917. 
Keller, Grover, enlisted May 31, 1917; residence, Hartsville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Kennedy, William L^ enlisted Aug. 20, 1917; residence, Grand View, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; trans, to Hospital Trans- 
port No. 242 Oct. 8, 1918. 
Killian, Frank H., enlisted May 9, 1917; residence, Evansville. Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Kirkpatrick, Walter W^ enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Evansville. 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
LJawrence, Kenneth, enlisted Aug. 13, 1917; residence, Columbus. 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; promoted to Corp. April 

8, 1918. 
Leeson, Walter, enlisted Aug. 14, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Little, Herman A., enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Eliabethtown, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; promoted to Corp. July 12. 

1918. 
Lowe, Orville, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence. Boonville, Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Madden, Elmer, enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Majors, Otho S^ enlisted June 30, 1917; residence, Winslow, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; trans, to June Replacement 

Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Maples, William, enlisted June 26, 1917; residence. Clear Springs. 

Ind.; trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Marshall, Charles S^ enlisted May 31, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; appointed Wag. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Mason, Benjamin H^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Columbus. 

Ind.; trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Masters, Luther H^ enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Boonville. Ind.; 

trans, to Ord. Corps Nov. 3, 1917. 
McNeely, John H., enlisted Aug. 27, 1917; residence, Evansville. Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; appointed Wag. Sept. 1, 1918. 
McWllliams, Ira M^ enlisted Aug. 27, 1917; residence, Columbus. 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Middleton, Archie A^ enlisted May 4, 1917; residence, Boonville. Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Miller, Dewey, enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Columbus. Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Miller, Earl N, enlisted July 25, 1917; residence, Hope, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Miller, John V^ enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Boonville. Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; trans, to June Replacement 

Detachment June 4, 1918. 



BATTERY D 397 



Privates 
MUer, William H^ enlisted Aug. 2, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl.' Nov. 1, 1917; trans, to June Replacement 

Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Mitchell, Herman A^ enlisted Aug. 29, 1917; residence, Tennyson, 

Ind. 
Montgomery, James A^ enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Boonville. 

Ind.; trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Morrison, Robert B^ enlisted Aug. 15, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Mourey, Fred J^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Elizabethtown, 

Ind.; promoted to Corp. Nov. 18, 1917; trans, to Hq. Co., 139 F. A., 

as Corp., June 28, 1918. 
Murray James E^ enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; appointed Wag. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Nix, Ora G^ enlisted June 29, 1917; residence, Newburg, Ind.; trans. 

to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Neth, Frank J^ enlisted June 30, 1917; residence. Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
^'^eufelder, Carl T^ enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.: 

trans, to U. S. Guards June 11, 1918. 
Norton, Raymond^ enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Clifford, Ind.; 

discharged April 4, 1918. 
Oliver, Ora R^ enlisted Aug. 10, 1917; residence, Hartsville, Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Owens, George E., enlisted Aug. 10, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Patterson, Earl, enlisted June 4, 1917; residence, Neadham, Ind.; 

appointed Wag. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Payne, Cecil ^Y^ enlisted Sept. 11, 1917; residence, Brownstown, 

Ind.; discharged May 16, 1918. 
Perry, Charles R,, enlisted Aug. 27, 1917; residence, Hope, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Perry, Ray C^ enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Hope, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Posey, Noble, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Tennyson, Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Richards, Jerry L^ enlisted May 31, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Rhodes, Clarence A^ enlisted July 18, 1917; residenco, BoonviHe. 

Ind.; trans, to Hq. Detachment, 63rd P. A. Brigade, Jan. 16, 1917; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., June 22, 1918; trans, to Development 

Battalion Sept. 1, 1918. 
Rice, Earless C., enlisted Aug. 21, 1917; residence. Providence, Ky.; 

discharged Jan. 14, 1918. 
Risley, Thomas L., enlisted Aug. 1, 1917 ; residence, Petersburg, Ind. ; 

promoted to Corp. Nov. 18, 1917. 
Roach, Homer, enlisted May 9, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Robertson, Dewey, enlisted Aug. 13, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, to Ord. Detachment, 139 F. A., Jan. 4, 1918. 
Robinson, Otis J^ enlisted July 19, 1917; residence. Boonville, Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4. 1918. 
Rocca, Gns P«, enlisted June 9, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Rogge, Edward H., enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind. 
Romine, Walter S^ enlisted Sept. 25, 1917; residence. Hope. Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; appointed Wag. Sept. 1, 1918. 



398 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Priyates 
Rudd, Romay L,, enlisted Aug. 20, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Rush, Ray enlisted May 31, 1917; residence. Flat Rock, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 el. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Sandlin, John M,, enlisted May 4, 1917; residence, Moulton, Ala.; 

trans, to Jujie Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Sanders, James D., enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; trans, to June Replacement 

Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Schuetz, Joseph H^ enlisted July 6, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; appointed Wag. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Seward, Forest E^ enlisted Sept. 13, 1917; residence, Hope, Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Shattock, Fred, enlisted June 19, 1917; residence, Elizabethtown, 

Ind.; trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Shaw, Clarence, enlisted June 4, 1917; residence. Flat Rock, Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Smith, Peter J,, enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Newburg, Ind.; 

trans, to M. P.s Oct. 15, 1917; .trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Nov. 5, 

1917; discharged April 4, 1918. 
Smith, Chauncy M^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; trans, to Field Hospital, 

113th Sanitary Train, April 4, 1918. 
Smith, Sammy C., enlisted June 4, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. I cl. Nov. 1, 1917; trans, to M. P.'s Oct. 15, 1917; 

trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Nov. 5, 1917; trans to June Replacement 

Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Smith, Russell, enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Vernon, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917 
Spicer, Harley D., enlisted July 30, 1917; residence, Franklin, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Steel, Lawrence, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Blackford, Ky.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; promoted to Corp. July 12, 1918. 
Stephens, Herbert, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

deserted May 11, 1918. 
Stewart, George T^ enlisted April 15, 1917; residence, Hartsville, 

Ind.; trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Stribling, Herbert F^ enlisted June 4, 1917; residence, Burney, Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Stone, David, enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; appointed Bugler Sept. 1, 1918. 
Summers, Charles E^ enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; promoted to Corp. July 

12, 1918. 
Swiggett, William H^ enlisted Aug. 15, 1917; residence, Edinburg, 

Ind.; promoted to Corp. Nov. 18, 1917; reduced to Pvt. 1 cl. May 

9, 1918; trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Tindle, James S., enlisted Aug. 13, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to M. P.s Oct. 8, 1917; trans, to Bat. D, 139 F. A., July 20, 

1918; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Dec. 1, 1918. 
Taylor, Homer W. enlisted Sept. 15, 1917; residence. Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Taylor, Roscoe, enlisted May 7. 1917; residence, Boonville. Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; reduced to Pvt. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Thompson, Oscar M^ enlisted Aug. 23, 1917; residence, Ogilville, 

Ind.; trans, to Ord. Corps Nov. 3, 1917. 
Thurston, Clifford, enlisted June 11, 1917; residence. Burney, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 1. 1918. 



BATTERY D 399 



Privates 
Ulsomer, John 31^ enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind. 
Wagner, Harry B^ enlisted Sept. 17, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Wagner, Mcholas E^ enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; trans, to June Replacement 

Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Walker, Harry C^ enlisted June 30, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; trans, to U. S. Guards June 11, 1918. 
Walters, Joseph W^ enlisted July 30, 1917 ; residence, Franklin, Ind. ; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Weber, Walter L^ enlisted May 5, 1917 ; residence, Evansville, Ind. ; 

appointed Wag. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Weiskopf, Leo, enlisted June 9, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Western, Wardell, enlisted Aug. 4, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

appointed Wag. Sept. 1, 1918. 
White, Clyde E^ enlisted Aug. 30, 1917; residence, Hartsville, Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Wilber, Iforval N^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Elizabethtown, 

Ind.; trans, to Hq. 63rd P. A. Brigade May 9. 1918. 
Wilber, Cleveland, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Elizabethtown, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Williams, Carrol E^ enlisted Sept. 1, 1917; residence, Colfax, 111.; 

trans, to Hospital, Camp Merritt, N. J., Jan. 4, 1919. 
Williams, Charles M^ enlisted May 5, 1917; residence, Tennyson, Ind. 
Williams, Clarence E^ enlisted June 19, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; trans, to Q. M. C. Jan. 

16, 1918. 
Williams, William R„ enlisted Sept. 1, 1917; residence, Colfax, 111.; 

trans, to Development Battalion June 22, 1918. 
Wilkinson, James H^ enlisted May 8, 1917; residence, Boonville, Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Wilson; Harold, enlisted Aug. 30, 1917; residence, Inglefield, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Wolf, Carl R^ enlisted Sept. 3. 1917; residence. Columbus, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; promoted to Corp. July 12, 1918. 
Wooldridge, Leslie, enlisted May 8, 1917; residence. Boonville, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; discharged Feb. 7, 1918. 
Wooten, George E^ enlisted Aug. 2, 1917; residence, Terre Haute, Ind. 
Wright, Alonzo J^ enlisted Aug. 13, 1917; residence, Columbus. Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Nov. 1, 1917; appointed Mech. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Welch, Roy, enlisted June 19, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; in 

desertion from Oct. 19, 1917, to Feb. 8, 1918; trans, to Development 

Battalion June 22, 1918. 
Yaley, Archie L^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Elizabethtown, 

Ind.; trans, to U. S. Guards June 11, 1918. 
Young, Bennie E., enlisted Aug. 20, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind. 
Unless otherwise stated in the remarks, all of the above volunteer 
soldiers were honorably discharged from the service of the United 
States at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind., Jan. 15, 1919. 

The following volunteer soldiers were received by Battery D, 139th 
F. A., on date and from place shown in remarks. 
Downs, Oren G., enlisted Jan. 3, .1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 
trans, from Hq. Detachment, 171st Inf., to Bat. D, 139 P. A., Nov. 
22, 1917; promoted to Corp. April 8, 1918. 



400 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Privates 
Leuthold, Lawrence, enlisted Oct. 20, 1917; residence, Columbus, 

Ind.; enlisted and assigned to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Oct. 20, 1917; dis- 
charged April 12, 1918. 
Mitchell, Wayne G., enlisted Aug. 27, 1917; residence. Farmland, 

Ind.; trans, from 149th Field Hospital to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Aug. 

15, 1918; appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Owens, Yernon H., enlisted July 3, 1917; residence, Farmland, Ind.; 

trans, from 149th Field Hospital to Bat. D, 139 F. A., Aug. 6, 1918; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Wolf, Jacob, enlisted July 4, 1917; residence, unknown, trans, from 

Casual Co., Camp Merritt, N. J., to B-at. D, 139 F. A., Sept. 25, 1918; 

trans, to Base Hospital, Camp Upton, N. Y., Oct. 5, 1918. 

The following seven men were transferred from the 159th Depot 
Brigade to Bat. D, 139 F. A., on Oct. 20, 1917. 
Privates 
Earheart, Lawrence, enlisted Oct. 4, 1917; residence. Keystone, Ind.; 

trans, to June Replacement Detachment June 4, 1918. 
Middleton, Clarence K^ enlisted Sept. 21, 1917; residence, North 

Manchester, Ind, ;., appointed Wag. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Provines, Alexander G^ enlisted Oct. 5, 1917; residence, Roann, Ind.; 

trans, to Hospital, Camp Merritt, N. J., Jan. 4, 1919. 
Shepherd, Trn^ W^ enlisted Oct. 4, 1917; residence, Bluffton, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cl. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Starks, Emetj' ,, jj., enlisted, Oct. 5, 1917; residence, Wabash, Ind.; 

appointed Qbok. Sept. 1„ 1918. 
Strain, Earl "E,, enlisted Sept. 20, 1917; residence, Bluffton, Ind.; 

appointed Pvt. 1 cL Sept. 1, 1918. 
Wenger, Fred., enlisted. Oct. 4, 1917; residence, Verecruse, Ind.; 

discharged Dec. .19,. 1917. 

Unless otherwise stated in the remarks, these men were discharged 
at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind., Jan, 15, 1919. 

The following twenty-six men were transferred from the Detention 
Camp, Camp Shelijy, Miss., to Battery D, 139th F. A., June 18, 1918. 

Privates 

Cassoutt, Joseph B., enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, St. Marys, Mo. 
Clark, Middleton B^ enlisted May 28, 1918; residence, Sarepta, Miss. 
Goeddel, Rudolph H^ enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, Columbia, 

111.; trans, to Development Battalion Aug. 29, 1918. 
Goodin, Claude B., enlisted May 26, 1918; residence, Beardstown, 

111.; trans, to Base Hospital, Camp Upton, N. Y., Oct. 5, 1918. 
Hall, Charles C^ enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, McCall Creek, Miss. 
Huffstiittler, James F., enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, Carmi, 111, 
James, John L^ enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, Maunie, 111,; trans. 

to Hospital, Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Jan. 9, 1919. 
Kunnemann, John» Jr., enlisted May 25, 1918; residence, Granite 

City, 111.; appointed Wag. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Leo, Clarence L., enlisted May 25, 1918; residence, Monmouth, 111.. 

discharged Aug* 27, 1918. 
Merrlman, Noah S., enlisted May 25, 1918; residence, Madison, 111.; 

appointed Wag. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Miller, Otto, enlisted May 27, 1918; residence. Enfield. 111. 
Miller, Carl E., enlisted May 25, 1918; residence, Galesburg, 111. 
Nlenhaus, Charles H., enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, Prairie Du 

Rocher, 111. 



BATTERY D 401 



Privates 

Petry, Anton, enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, Prairie Dii Rocher, 

111.; appointed Wag. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Pitts, Charles 0^ enlisted May 26, 1918; residence, luka. Miss.; 

appointed Wag. Sept. 1, 1918; trans, to Hospital, Camp Merritt, 

N. J., Jan. 4, 1919. 
Eamsey, John, enlisted May 24, 1918; residence, Galconda, 111. 
Rice, Tom D^ enlisted May 26, 1918; residence, Westville, 111.; 

appointed Wag. Sept. 1, 1918; trans, to Hospital, Camp Merritt, 

N. J., Jan. 4, 1919. 
Ryan, James A^ enlisted May 27, 1918; residence. Red Bud, 111. 
Schilling, William H^ enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, Chester, 111.; 

trans, to Base Hospital, Camp Upton, N. Y., Oct. 5, 1918. 
Snow, Haryey S., enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, Ackerman, Miss.; 

trans, to Hospital, Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind., Jan. 9, 1919. 
Spruell, Charles W^ enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, Springerton, 111. 
Storey, Ernie, enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, Norris City, 111. 
Sturm, Ernest, enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, Grayville, 111.; 

trans, to Hospital No. 15, Coetquiden, France, Nov. 6, 1918. 
Wertz, Frank W., enlisted May 26, 1918; residence, Burges, 111.; 

appointed Wag. Sept. 1, 1918. 
Zitt, Adam H^ enlisted May 25, 1918; residence, Evansville, 111. 
Foley, Lnther R,, enlisted May 27, 1918; residence, Enfield, 111. 
Unless otherwise stated in the remarks, these men were discharged 
at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind., Jan, 15, 1919, 

The following twenty-four men were transferred from the Sweeney 
Auto Mechanic School, Kansas City, Mo., to Battery D, 139th F. A., 
on Aug. 19, 1918. 
Privates 

Martin, John A^ enlisted June 21, 1918; residence, Kahoka, Mo. 

Jfeuschaefer, Robert E^ enlisted June 12, 1918; residence, Chicago, 111. 

Noll, Charles W., enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Lanark, 111. 

Nnsko, Henry F., enlisted June 14, 1918; residence^ 2008 West Twenty- 
second street, Chicago, 111. ' ' 

O'Brien, Steven W^ enlisted June 20, 1918; residence, 7045 Yale 
avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Oink, William A^ enlisted June 13, 1918; residence, Chicago, 111. 

Oksas, Karol J^ enlisted June 23, 1918; riesidfence, 2332 West 
Twenty-third Place, Chicago, 111. , : 

Oram, Walter H., enlisted June 13, 1918; residence,' 4912 North Hoyne 
avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Ostendorf, William J„ enlisted June 22, 19i8; resid;ehce, Aurora, 111.; 
promoted to Corp. Nov. 23, 1918. 

Ostling, John A^ enlisted June 13, 1918; residence, 11942 Michigan 
avenue,; Chicago, 111. 

Ott. Arthur J^ enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Chicago, 111. 

Pajkowski, Benedick T^ enlisted June 13, 1918; residence. South 
Chicago, 111. 

Pawlicki, Andrew S^ enlisted June 13, 1918; residence. Chicago, 111. 

Peterson, Marshall S., enlisted June 13, 1918; residence, Chicago, 
111.; trans, to Base Hospital, Camp Upton, N. Y., Oct. 5, 1918. 

Pluskwa, Alexander, enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, 2538 South- 
port avenue, Chicago. 111. 

Portman, John A^ enlisted June 13, 1918; residence, 4708 Polk 
street, Chicago, 111. 

Prassa, Clement, enlisted June 28, 1918; residence, Chicago, 111. 



402 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Privates 

Przewlocki, Leonard, enlisted June 13, 1918; residence, Chicago, 111. 

Rayesloot, Peter, enlisted June 14, 1918; residence. South Holland, 111. 

Reedy, Timothy J., enlisted June 21, 1918; residence, Rockford, 111. 

Rewoldt, Albert C^ enlisted June 13, 1918; residence, Chicago, 111.; 
trans, to Overseas Casuals, Camp Merritt, N. J., Oct. 5, 1918. 

Bibiclias, Paul, enlisted June 23, 1918; residence, Chicago, 111.; 
trans, to Hospital, Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Jan. 9, 1919. 

Riggs, Loyd H^ enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Chicago, 111. 

Ringgenberg, Frederick A., enlisted June 13, 1918; residence, Chi- 
cago, 111. 

Unless otherwise stated in the remarks, these men were all dis- 
charged at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind., Jan. 15, 1919. 

Transferred from University of Madison, Wis., Auto School on 
Aug. 14, 1918, to Battery D, 139th F. A. 

Privates 

Sykes, Harry L,, enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Bayfield, Wis. 

Taylor, Earl, enlisted June 15, 1918; residence, Wentworth, Wis. 

Tozier, Warren D^ enlisted June 15, 1918; residence, Stevens Point, 
Wis. 

Unless otherwise stated in the remarks, the above named men were 
discharged at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind., Jan. 15, 1919. 

The following twenty-three men were transferred from the Deten- 
tion Camp, Camp Shelby, Miss., to Battery D, 139th F. A., Aug. 23, 1918. 

Privates 
Eason, Basil, enlisted July 6, 1918; residence, Stuttgart, Ark.; trans. 

to Base Hospital, Camp Upton, N. Y., Oct. 5, 1918. 
Danielson, Roy M., enlisted June 15, 1918; residence, Wis.; 

trans, to Development Battalion, Camp Shelby, Miss., Sept. 14, 1918. 
Beard, George L^ enlisted Aug. 8, 1918; residence, Sonwilpa, Ala. 
Clower, Levi C enlisted Aug. 8, 1918; residence, Columbia, Miss. 
Davis, Hill E^ enlisted Aug. 9, 1918; residence, Collins, Miss. 
Dunning, William L^ enlisted Aug. 9, 1918; residence, Vicksburg. 

Miss.; trans, to Hospital, Camp Merritt, N. J., Jan. 4, 1919. 
Evans, Joe C, enlisted Aug. 5, 1918; residence, Jacksonville, Fla. 
Ford, James M,, enlisted Aug. 8, 1918; residence, Jamestown, Miss.; 

trans, to Hospital Transport 242, Oct. 16, 1918. 
Foreman, Henry C^ enlisted Aug. 14, 1918; residence, Ala.; 

trans, to Base Hospital, Camp Upton, N. Y., Oct. 5, 1918. 
Hargett, Kilmer, enlisted Aug. 8, 1918; residence, Russelville, Ala. 
Hubbard, Ernest L^ enlisted Aug. 6, 1918; residence, Ala.; 

trans, to Development Battalion, Camp Shelby, Miss., Sept. 15, 1918. 
Ingram, Grover R., enlisted Aug. 7, 1918; residence, Delta, Ala. 
Jones, Ruppert R^ enlisted Aug. 6, 1918; residence, Ark.; 

trans, to Hospital Transport 242 Oct. 16, 1918. 
McClendon, Roy, enlisted Aug. 5, 1918; residence, Danville, Ark. 
Mitchell, John T^ enlisted Aug. 8, 1918; residence, Ala.; 

trans, to Development Battalion, Camp Shelby, Miss., Sept. 14, 1918. 
Norwood, Robert C^ enlisted Aug. 7, 1918; residence, Springfield, La. 
Pearson, Newton C^ enlisted Aug. 14, 1918; residence, Craigford, Ala. 
Porch, James M^ enlisted Aug. 8, 1918; residence, Pelahatchie, Miss.; 

trans, to Hospital, Camp Merritt, N. J., Jan. 4, 1919. 
Rodman, Walter E^ enlisted Aug. 8, 1918; residence, Sarah, Miss.; 

trans, to Hospital, Camp Merritt, N. J., Jan. 4, 1919. 
Rollins, Charles E^ enlisted Aug. 9, 1918; residence, Moss Point, Miss. 
Self, Oren F„ enlisted Aug. 6, 1918; residence. Pollard, Ark. 



BATTERY D 403 



PriTates 

Sisco, Pleas B^ enlisted Aug. 15, 1918 ; residence, Harmony, Ark. 

Vaughn, Walter D., enlisted Aug. 5, 1918; residence, Moss Point, 
Miss.; trans, to Hospital, Port of Debarkation, Hoboken, N. J., 
Dec. 23, 1918. 

If not otherwise stated in the remarks, these men were all dis- 
charged at Ft. Benjamin Harrison on Jan. 15, 1919. 

Received as transfer from Headquarters Co., 139th F. A. 
PriTates 
Gross, Roy E^ enlisted June 14, 1918; residence, Elgin, 111.; trans. 

to Base Hospital, Camp Upton, N. Y., Oct. 5, 1918. 
Reeves, Arthur L^ enlisted May 25, 1918 ; residence, Raymond, Miss. 
Rncker, Clifford, enlisted May 24, 1918; residence, Polo, 111.; trans. 

to Hospital, Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind., Jan. 9, 1919. 
Bousey, Elbert, enlisted May 28, 1918; residence, unknown; trans. 

to Base Hospital, Camp Upton, N. Y., Oct. 5, 1918. 
Unless otherwise stated in the remarks, these men were all dis- 
charged at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind., Jan. 15, 1919. 

The following miscellaneous transfers were made to Battery D, 
139th F. A., as shown in the remarks. 
Privates 
Fowler, William, enlisted Aug. 20, 1918; residence, Red Level, Ala.; 

trans, from Detention Camp, Camp Shelby, Miss., to Bat. D, 139 

F. A., Sept. 15, 1918. 
Greer, Wesley, enlisted Jan. 25, 1918; residence, Mineral Wells, 

Tex.; trans, from Replacement troops. Camp Merritt, N. J., Oct. 

1, 1918. 
Freeman, Louis E^ enlisted July 1, 1918; residence, Cambridge, 

Mass.; trans, from Replacement troops. Camp Merritt, N. J., 

Oct. 1, 1918. 
Walker, Charlie W., enlisted Dec. 7, 1917; residence, San Diego, Cal.; 

trans, from Replacement troops, Camp Merritt, N. J., Oct. 1, 1918. 
Wirbel, Frank H^ enlisted May 29, 1918; residence, Hamilton, O.; 

trans, from Replacement troops. Camp Merritt, N. J., Oct. 1, 1918. 
Woods, Charlie, enlisted June 26, 1918; residence, unknown; trans. 

from Replacement troops. Camp Merritt, N. J., Oct, 1, 1918; trans. 

to Base Hospital, Camp Upton, N. Y., Oct. 5, 1918. 
Unless otherwise stated in the remarks, these men were all dis- 
charged at Ft. Benjamin Harrison, Ind., Jan. 15, 1919, 

In addition to the regular officers, the following officers saw duty 
with Battery D, 139th F. A., as shown by the remarks following each 
officer's name. 
Lieut. Chelsea C. Boone, attached Oct. 3, 1917; residence, Whiteland, 

Ind.; assigned to Hq. Co., 139 F, A,, Feb. 2, 1918, but attached to 

Bat. D until Sept. 1, 1918, when he was attached to Bat. E. 
Lieut. J. C. Hobbs, attached Oct. 3, 1917; residence, unknown; assigned 

to 138th F. A. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Lieut. Edward J. Dundon, attached Oct. 3, 1917; residence, Wisconsin; 

assigned to 138th F. A. Nov. 1, 1917. 
Lieut. Thomas E. Sandidge, attached Oct. 3, 1917; residence, unknown. 
Lieut. David Douglas, assigned Feb. 17, 1918; residence, Galveston, 

Tex,; assigned Hq. Co., 139 F. A„ July 18, 1918, 
Lieut. Harry W. Taylor, assigned July 23, 1918; residence, Elkhart, Ind. 
Lieut. Leslie C. Pitts, assigned May 1, 1918; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

assigned to Bat, C, 139 F. A„ June 20, 1918, 



464 THE STORY OP THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Lieut. Percy J. Paxton, assigned June 22, 1918; residence, Princeton, 
Ind.; trans, to Hospital Transport 242 Oct. 16, 1918. 

Lient. Louis H. Bieler, attached Oct. 17, 1918; residence, Indianapolis, 
Ind.; trans, to Bat. F, Nov. 9, 1918. 

Lieut. Groth, assigned Oct. 31, 1918; residence, unknown; trans, to 
137th F. A. Nov. 3,1918, 

Lieut. Cliarles E* Queiitel, assigned Nov, 2, 1918; residence, Chat- 
tanooga, Tenn. 

Lieut. Robert F. Finclier, assigned Nov. 2, 1918; residence, Macon, Ga. 

Lieut. Samuel Henderson, attached Nov. 4, 1918; residence, Talladega, 
Ala.; attached to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Nov. 11, 1918. 

Lieut. Quincy Young, attached Nov. 20, 1918; relieved from duty with 
Battery Nov. 29, 1918. 

Capt. George Brookhart, assigned Nov. 22, 1918; residence. New York; 
relieved from duty with Battery Nov. 27, 1918. 
Unless otherwise stated in the remarks, these officers were dis- 
charged at Ft. Benjamin Harrinson on Jan. 15, 1919. 



Battery E, 139th Field Artillery 

(Organized as Company I, 4th Indiana Infantry) 

Company I, of the 4th Indiana Infantry, was recruited 
at Madison, Indiana. Captain Horace 0. Woolford, for 
many years an officer in Indiana's National Guard, was 
the moving spirit of the enterprize. With him was 
associated Harry H. Cope, who became 1st Lieutenant 
of the company. A httle later John W. Driggs came in 
as 2d Lieutenant. 

The first boys who joined the company went to work 
with a lot of enthusiasm to bring their friends into the 
organization. So well did they succeed that in a very short 
time the organization was completed with officers and 
non-commissioned officers discharging their respective 
duties. For about a month the company was assembled 
for drill twice a week at the armory, and the boys had 
their first lessons in "Squads right." 

On Sunday morning, August 5th, Company I was 
mustered into Federal service and on the same day went 
into camp at Chautauqua Park at Madison, with the 
following officers and men: 

ROSTER OF COMPAirr I, ITH INDIANA INFANTRY 

Capt Horace 0. Woolford, commissioned July 13, 1917; residence, 
Madison, Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 

1st Lieut. Harry H. Cope, commissioned July 13, 1917 ; residence, Mad- 
ison, Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 

2d Lieut, John W. Driggs, commissioned July 13, 1917 ; residence. North 
Madison, Ind.; trans, to Bat. E. 139 F. A. Oct. 1. 1917. 

1st Sergt. Albert H. Watts, enlisted July 10, 1917 : residence, Hanover. 
Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 

Sup. Sergt. Charles J. Wyltoff, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Mad- 
ison, Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 

Sergt. Hayden H. Bear, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison. 
Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 

Sergt, Howard N. Demaree, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, 
Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 



406 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Sergt. Lyman Faulconer, enlisted July 31, 1917; residence, North 

Madison, Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Ser^ Eldo Landerbaugh, enlisted July 31, 1917; residence, Moorfield, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Corp. Clifford Brlnson, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Corp. George Cowlan, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Corp. John Dilllnder, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Corp. Romaine Eaglln, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Corp. Ansel Kurtz, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Corp. Huey McKay, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Corp. Edward Tarpy, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Corp. HalUe Lawson, residence, Hanover, Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 

F. A,. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Corp. Charles Creamer, enlisted July 15, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Cook Lawrence Ferris, enlisted July 10, 1917 ; residence, Madison, Ind. ; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Cook Clarence McDaniel, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Bngler Robert J. Schrieber, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Hanover, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Bugler Samuel A. Steigerwald, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Mad- 
ison, Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Privates 
Anger, Charles H., enlisted Sept. 6, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Arbuckle, Corbett, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Barrett, Mike, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Bayne, Goebel, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Milton, Ky.; trans. 

to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1. 1917. 
Blake, Charles W., enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Kent, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Boldery, Alvin, residence, Milton, Ky.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., 

Oct. 1, 1917. 
Brinson, George L., enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Manville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Brinson, John E., enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Manville, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Brown, Edward W., enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Cole, Phillip S., enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Copeland, Edward, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Balgleish, John W., enlisted Aug. 10, 1917; residence, Madison, 

Ind.; trane. to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Davis, Fred, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; trans. 

to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Dilllnder, Bert, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 
trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 



BATTERY E 407 



Privates 
Dillinder, Henry, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Farmer, Francis, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Francisco, Raymond, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Fritzler, Bryan, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Brooksburg, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Fritzler, Edward, enlisted July 10, 1917 ; residence, Brooksburg, Ind. ; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Garlinghouse, Fred, enlisted July 10, 1917 ; residence. North Madison, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Gordon, Robert C^ enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Greenwood, Howard, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Gnnnell, Arthur, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Haak, Harry G^ enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A.. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Hall, Perry E, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Hertz^ Edward, enlisted Aug. 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Hoffman, Charles, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Jackson, John, enlisted July 31, 1917; residence, North Madison, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Jackson, Paul S., enlisted July 31, 1917; residence, North Madison, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Jones, Bernard, enlisted Sept. 6, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Jones, Dan W^ enlisted July 16, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Klein, Charles R^ enlisted Sept. 7, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat, E. 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Kleopfer, Herman, enlisted July 31, 1917; residence, Kent, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Long, Barney, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; trans. 

to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Long, William H^ enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Vevay, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Mires, Peter, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Iiid.; trans. 

to' Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Moore, Lawson, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Brooksburg, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
IVay, Elmer, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; trans. 

to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Ifay, Otis E., enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; trans. 

to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Officer, William, enlisted July 31, 1917; residence. North Madison, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
O'Loughlin, Louis, enlisted July 31, 1917; residence. North Madison, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
O'Loughlin, William, enlisted July 31, 1917; residence. North Mad- 
ison, Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Patterson, Stanley, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 



408 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Priyates 

Potter, TVilliam H., enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.: 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Reed, Fallis, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Erooksburg, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Reed, Harry, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Caanan, Ind.; trans. 

to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Richards, Charles, enl'sted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Rogers, William E^ enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.: 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Sandifar, Chester, enlisted Aug. 14, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Schwab, John, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Scott, Robert, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Spicer, William, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Swan, Allen F„ enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, New Washington. 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Thompson, Lloyd, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Kent, Ind.: 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Wells, Arlie, enlisted Sept. 7, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Wells, Harry E,, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence. Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Whitham, Raleigh, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Osgood, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. J, 1917. 
Whitham, Warren, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Osgood, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Willick, Clarence, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence. Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Wood, Dnrward B., enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison. Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Wolfschlag, Carl, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Wykoff, Lee H^ enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Wyne, Ernest, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Yarber, Carl, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Milton, Kv.; trans. 

to Bat. E, 139 F. A.. Oct. 1, 1917. 
Zearing, Harvey, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Xay, Cecil, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence. Madison» Ind.; dis- 
charged Sept., 1917, 
Schmidt, James, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence. Madison. Ind.; 

discharged Sept., 1917. 
Tnmer, Paul, enlisted July 10. 1917; residence. Madison. Ind.; 

trans, to 150 F. A., "Rainbow Division," Sept. 15, 1917. 
Fisher, Elmer, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to 150 F. A., "Rainbow Division," Sept. 15, 1917. 
Phillips, James, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence. Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to 150 F. A., "Rainbow Division," Sept. 15, 1917. 
Sargeant, Leonard, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.: 

trans, to 150 P. A., "Rainbow Division," Sept. 15, 1917. 
Albee, Edward, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison. Ind.: 

trans, to 150 F. A., "Rainbow Division." Sept. 15, 1917. 



BATTERY E 409 

Privates 

ueecraft, Lee, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind. ; 

trans, to 150 F. A., "Rainbow Division," Sept. 15., 1917. 
Wentworth, William, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to 150 F. A., "Rainbow Division,' Sept. 15, 1917. 
Carden, Oscar, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to 150 F. A., "Rainbow Division," Sept. 15, 1917. 
Robison, Charles, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to 150 F. A., "Rainbow Division," Sept. 15, 1917. 
Jones, Eaymond, enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Madison, Ind.; 

trans, to 150 F. A., "Rainbow Division," Sept. 15. 1917. 

Chautauqua Park is a beautiful natural park on the 
bank of the Ohio River. The golf links of the Country 
Club made an ideal drill ground. Each day's program 
began with setting up exercises before mess and a road 
hike the first thing after mess. Oh, those awful road 
hikes! Sometimes we "hiked" five whole miles and it 
took the rest of the day on bunk fatigue to get over it. 
Often we have thought of those times when hiking for 
endless miles through French mud! 

Many amusing little incidents happened during the 
first days of drill and camp life. One night "Steigie" 
blew reveille instead of taps, but he had to tell us about 
it before we saw the joke. "Buddie Smith" addressed 
the 1st Sergeant as "Ducky" and got a severe reprimand 
and after that a favorite expression among the boys was, 
"Don't you realize who I am in this organization?" 

While in camp at Madison the business men raised a 
company fund of several hundred dollars and a few days 
before we left for Fort Harrison gave a reception and 
turned the money over to Captain Woolford. This recep- 
tion was a memorable occasion. A very large crowd 
witnessed the parade led by the Elk's band. The eve- 
ning was concluded with speeches by prominent citizens. 

After a month of camp life at Madison the company 
prepared to join the regiment at Fort Benjamin Har- 
rison. September 5th the officers and men entrained 

27 




CAPTAIN HORACE O. WOOLFORD 



BATTERY E 411 

in two coaches which were attached to the Indianapolis 
train. Arriving at the Fort the regimental band met them 
and escorted them to their place in camp. Company K was 
lined up singing, "Company I is a damn fine gang," and 
the other companies of the regiment welcomed them 
as warmly. 

The following men joined the company while encamped at Fort 
Benjamin Harrison. 
Priyates 
Acker, Frank 0^ enlisted Sept. 22, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Cattecliis, Mitchell, enlisted Sept. 22, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Punbar, Ora 0^ enlisted Sept. 24, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1, 1917. 
Robinson, Orval, enlisted Sept. 22, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans, to Bat. E, 139 F. A., Oct. 1. 1917. 

Tuesday morning, September 25th, the order came 
to break camp for the trip south. We were all anxious 
to be off to the land of flowers and sunshine, "where 
the warm gulf breezes fan the brow." 

When we arrived we began looking for the flowers 
and sunshine, but alas, they were not! However, in a 
few days the rain stopped and the mud dried up and 
we found that Camp Shelby was not so bad after all. 

The last few days of September were busy ones for 
everybody. The change from Company I to Battery E 
took place the last day of September, the company being 
transferred intact. 

The following men were added to the company to make it a Battery. 
Privates 

Sellers, Albert E., enlisted Sept. 1, 1917; residence, Oxford, Ohio; 

trans, from Co. K, 4th Ind, 
Bain, Charles L^ enlisted July 9, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. K, 4th Ind. 
Currie, James W., enlisted June 3, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. F, 4th Ind. 
Tanderschmidt, Sylvester, enlisted Aug. 1, 1917; residence, Evans- 

ville, Ind.; trans, from Co. G, 4th Ind. 
Barnett, Archie E., enlisted Sept. 1, 1917; residence, Evansville, 

Ind.; trans, from Co. G, 4th Ind. 
Barrlck, Earl L^ enlisted Sept. 25, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. G. 4th Ind. 



412 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

These men were all transferred ta Bat. E, 139tli F. A., October 
1, 1917. 
Privates 

Bea, Leonard AV., enlisted May 18, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans, from Co. D, 4th Ind. 
Blackburn, Herscliel, enlisted Aug. 18, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. E, 4th Ind. 
Borders, Flodie, enlisted July 3, 1917; residenca, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. H, 4th Ind. 
Brown, Mark E., enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; trans. 

from Co. E, 4th Ind. 
Cocklin, Leroy, enlisted July 5, 1917; residence, Huntington, Ind.; 

trans, from* Co. C. 4th Ind. 
Corn, Roscoe E^ enlisted June 28, 1917 ; residence, Huntington, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. C, 4th Ind. 
Cox, Arthur, enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; trans. 

from Co. G, 4th Ind. 
Cra^, Roy L^ enlisted May 8, 1917; residence. Huntington, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. C, 4th Ind.; discharged Dec. 15, 1917. 
Craiff, Lawrence, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. E, 4th Ind. 
Daily, Oliver, enlisted Sept. 24, 1917; residence, Huntington, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. C, 4th Ind. 
Eble, Fred H^ enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

traijs. from Co. G, 4th Ind. 
Esteb, Elmo, enlisted Aug. 18, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. H, 4th Ind. 
Evans, Omer, enlisted May 12, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. D, 4th Ind.; discharged Dec. 15, 1917. 
Feagley, Herbert T., enlisted May 7, 1917; residence, Evansville, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. G, 4th Ind. 
Barter, Clifton, enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. E, 4th Ind. 
Hays, Billie, enlisted Aug. 14, 1917; residence, Seymour, Ind.; trans. 

from Co. H, 4th Ind.; discharged March 10, 1918. 
Haynes, Ira, enlisted July 13, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; trans. 

from Co. E, 4th Ind. 
Heeter, Jacob, enlisted Sept. 20, 1917; residence, Huntington, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. C, 4th Ind. 
Huff, Mike, enlisted July 27, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; trans. 

from Co. F, 4th Ind. 
Jaynes, John S^ enlisted July 14, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. F, 4th Ind. 
Johnson, Dennis, enlisted Aug. 13, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. F, 4th Ind. 
Johnson, J. Walter, enlisted May 4, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans, from Co. D, 4th Ind.; discharged Dec. 15, 1917. 
Jones, Harry, enlisted Aug. 20, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; trans. 

from Co. E, 4th Ind.; discharged Dec. 15, 1917. 
Lucas, Leo, enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; trans. 

from Co. E, 4th Ind. 
McDonald, William, enlisted May 1, 1917; residence, Huntington, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. C, 4th Ind. 
Nichols, Homer L^ enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Indianapolis, 

Ind.; trans, from Co. D. 4th Ind. 
Osborn, Vergil, enlisted Aug. 17, 1917; residence, Huntington, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. C, 4th Ind. 
Propst, John J^ enlistpd Sept. 24. 1917; residence, Kings Mountain. 

N. C; trans, from Co. D. 4th Ind. 



BATTERY E 413 



Privates 
Sears, llalph, enlisted July 3, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; trans. 

from Co. F, 4tli Ind. 
Snyder, Orville J., enlisted May 1, 1917; residence, Huntington, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. C, 4th Ind. 
Suit, Paul W^ enlisted June 1, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; trans. 

from Co. E, 4th Ind. 
Tun^te, Calvin, enlisted Aug. 13, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. F, 4th Ind. 
Vandivier, Bruce, enlisted Sept. 12, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. F, 4th Ind. 
Weisenberg, Lynus, enlisted May 23, 1917; residence, Columbus, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. H, 4th Ind. 
Wood, Paul, enlisted May 1, 1917; residence, Huntington, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. C, 4th Ind. 
Yeiter, Frank D^ enlisted Feb. 2, 1917; residence Huntington, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. C, 4th Ind. 
Yocum, Ernest, enlisted July 27, 1917; residence, Huntington, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. C, 4th Ind.; died, Camp Shelby, April 4, 1918. 
Evans, Thome, enlisted Aug. 15, 1917; residence, Bedford, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. F, 4th Ind.; trans, to M. P. Oct. 17, 1917. 
Bay, Namen, enlisted Aug. 12, 1917; residence, Marion, Ind.; trans. 

from Co. E, 4th Ind.; trans, to Truck Co. 
Fleming, Albert, enlisted Sept. 1, 1917; residence, Huntington, Ind.; 

trans, from Co. C, 4th Ind. 

The following men were assigned to Battery E from 16th Battalion, 
159th Depot Brigade, Camp Taylor, Ky., Oct. 20, 1917. 
Privates 
Apple, Harrj' W.; residence, Huntington, Ind.; trans, to Development 

Battalion. 
Bearhs, Austin M.; residence, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 
Beavans, Lawrence; residence, Warren, Ind. 
Brahs, Martin; residence, Huntington, Ind. 
Bryant, Arthur D.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 
Buckingham, Lawrence; residence, Huntington, Ind. 
Bums, Baymond E.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 
Carpenter, George ^Y,; residence, Huntington, Ind.; trans, to 

Remount Depot. 
Carter, Balph J.; residence, Montpelier, Ind. 
Cook, Ernest E.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 
Coover, Carl H.; residence. Bluff ton, Ind. 
Bailey, Gerald M.; residence, BlufCton, Ind.; trans, to 420th Labor 

Battalion. 
Delhi, Frank R.; residence, Bluffton, Ind.; discharged Feb. 8, 1918 
Dungan, Eldon R,; residence, Huntington, Ind. 
Eschbach, Ray E.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 
Fair, Charles 0.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 
Fleck, Edwin P.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 
Fowerbaugh, John; residence, Huntington, Ind.; discharged Nov. 

15, 1917. 
Fox, John W.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 
Gemmer, Rudolph P.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 
Grimm, Georgre B.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 
Harris, Walter M.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 
Hart, Glenn D.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 
Hollett, Rudolph H.; residence, Huntington, Ind.; trans, to Div. 

Hq. Troop. 



414 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Privates 

Keefer, William C; residence, Huntington, Ind. 

Keith, Stewart E.; residence, Wabash, Ind. 

Kelley, Harley V.; residence. Ft. Wayne, Ind.; trans, to 152d Inf. 

King, Harry; residence, Huntington, Ind. 

Koontz, Thomas I.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 

Kranse, John T.; residence, North Bergen, N. J. 

Laurie, William H.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 

Ludwigson, Axel H.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 

Macon, Harry J.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 

McLanahan, Thomas, residence, Huntington, Ind. 

Meyer, John J.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 

Miller, Floyd E.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 

Mullen, James A.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 

Otis, Arthur; residence, Huntington, Ind. 

Palmer, Benjamin F.; residence. Bluff ton, Ind. 

Paul, Fred L.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 

Plank, Ottis V.; residence, Bluffton, Ind.; trans, to 420th Labor 
Battalion. 

Quackenbush, Curtis E.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 

Querry, John P.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 

Bif^gs, William E.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 

Sands, Floyd E.; residence, Bluffton, Ind. 

Schrock, Victor R,; residence, Huntington, Ind.; trans, to M. P. 

Sell, William C; residence, Huntington, Ind. 

Sheets, William C; residence, Huntington, Ind.; trans, to Develop- 
ment Battalion. 

Shoemaker, John; residence, Huntington, Ind. 

Skory, Louis M.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 

Souers, Leslie B.; residence, Huntington, Ind.; discharged May 
20, 1918. 

Snnderman, Rufus J.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 

Swaim, Benjamin E.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 

Sylvester, Fred E.; residence, Muncie, Ind. 

Watson, Russell T.; residence, Wabash, Ind. 

Wij^ner, Roscoe E.; residence, Wabash, Ind. 

Williams, William E.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 

Wineke, Edward W.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 

Zeigler, Clarence F.; residence, Huntington, Ind. 

The following men transferred to Battery E from 150th Infantry at 
Camp Shelby, Nov. 9, 1917. 
Privates 

Stealy, Julian L.; residence, Fairmount, W. Va. 

Thomas, Charlie ; residence, Fairmount, W. Va. 

Rodeheaver, Thurl B,; residence, Fairmount, W. Va. 

June 15, 1918, the following men were transferred to the Replace- 
ment Battalion for immediate oversea service. 

Privates Privates 

Blake, Charles. Barnett, Archie. 

Brown, Edward. Barrett^ Mike. 

Cole, Phillip. Boldery, Alvin. 

Baprleish, John. Cocklin, LeRoy. 

Fritzler, Bryan. Cook, Ernest. 

Fritzler, Edward. Cox, Arthur. 

Palmer, Frank. Davis, Fred. 

Paul, Fred Bnnckman, Thomas. 

Reed, Harry. Dungan, Eldon. 



BATTERY E 



415 



Priyates 

Nichols, Homer. 

Otis, Arthur. 

Patterson, Stanley. 

Potter, William. 

Qnackenbush, Curtis. 

Querry, Paul. 

Riggs, William. 

Rodeheaver, Thurl. 

Sell, Frank. 

Scott, Robert. 

Shoemaker, John. 

Sunderman, Rufus. 

Swaim, Earl. 

Thomas, Charles. 

Tungate, Calvin. 

Watson, Russell. 

Tanderschmidt, Sylvester J. 

Weisenberg, Lynus. 

Wood, Paul. 

Miltonberger, John. 
Sergt, George S. Cowlam, trans. 

June 5, 1918. 
Sergt. Harry E. Wells, trans, to O 
2d Lieut. Aug. 31, 1918. 



Privates 

Borders, Flodie. 

Eschbach, Ray. 

Esteb, Elmo. 

Fisher, Russell. 

Fleck, Edwin. 

Fleming, Albert. 

Fox, John. 

Greenwood, Howard. 

Grimm, George. 

Harter, Clifton. 

Huff, Mike. 

Johnson, Dennis. 

Keefer, William. 

Kurtz, Ansel. 

Laurie, William. 

Lucas, Leo. 

Macon, Harry. 

McClennahan, Thomas. 

Meyer, John. 

Mullen, James. 
to Labor Battalion at New York. 

. T. C. June 8, 1918; commissioned 



On June 15, 1918, the following men were transferred to Develop- 
ment Battalion at Syracuse, N. Y. 



Bugler Robert J. Schrieber. 
Privates 1st Class 

Bayne, Goebel. 

Ferris, Lawrence. 

Hall, George. 
Privates 

Brown, Mark. 

Dillinder, Bert, 

Farmer, Francis. 



Privates 
Haynes, Ira. 
Heeter, Jacob. 
McDonald, William. 
Swan, Allyn. 
Yandiver, Bruce, 
Whitham, Raleigh. 
Whitham, Warren. 
Yarber, Carl. 



June 16, 1918, the following men were assigned to the battery from 
Camp Shelby Detention Camp. 

Privates 
Alford, Leonard W.; residence. Thorn, Miss. 
Allen, Charles H.; residence, Streator, 111. 
Bates, John H.; residence, Bethany Lee, Miss. 
Berry, James P.; residence. New Hebron, Miss. 
Bischof, Frank A.; residence, Pinckney, 111. 
Clayton, Joel R,; residence, Wallerville, Miss. 
Coggin, James A.; residence, Nettleton, Miss. 
Conant, Charlie; residence, Kinmundy, 111. 
Croxton, Lawrence E.; trans, to Development Battalion. 
Dillon, Raymond 0.; residence, DuQuoin, 111. 
Dorris, Earl; residence, Salem, 111. 
Duncan, Charles M.; residence, Salem, 111. 
Duncan, Henry 0; trans, to Development Battalion. 
Graham, Ernest E.; residence, Pana, 111. 
Grear, George R.; residence, Anna, 111. 
Groome, George E.; residence, Vicksburg, Miss. 
Gommilion, Joseph C; residence, Harperville, Miss. 



416 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Gordon, Clarence M.; residence, Clara, Miss. 
(xosa, Henry J,; discharged. 
Hall, Charles W.; residence, Kell, 111. 
Hawley, Robert H,; residence, Westervelt, 111. 
Helms, Joe W.; residence. Darling, Miss. 
Horton, John R,; residence, Lena, 111. 
Jaggers, Curtis E,; residence, Horse Cave, Ky. 

Kette, Charles C; residence, Vicksburg, Miss.; trans, to Medical 
Corps. 

Privates 

Lancaster, John R.; discharged. 

Larkin, Albert; residence, Benton, 111. 

Linker, Hardy; discharged. 

Lively, William F,; trans, to Development Battalion. 

Mills, Yancy D.; residence, Richton, Miss. 

Ostroffsky, Ameil; residence, Vicksburg, Miss.; trans, to Medical 
Corps. 

Phillips, Charles H.; trans, to Development Battalion. 

Phillips, Han*y W.; residence, Birmingham, 111. 

Philpots, Harry H.; residence, Vicksburg, Miss.; trans, to Develop- 
ment Battalion. 

Reinhold, Oscar J.; residence, Waterloo, 111. 

Richardson, Louie 'S,; residence, Centralia, 111. 

Rozene, Henry A.; residence, Stewardson, 111. 

Rutledj^e, Claude L.; residence. Myrtle, Miss. 

Schmidt, Georp^e W.; residence, Columbia, 111. 

Severe, Walter S.; residence, Shelby ville. 111. 

Shepherd, Otto; trans, to Development Battalion. 

Stambaugh, Cleve; residence, Vermont, 111. 

Stevens, Tom; residence, Laurel, Miss. 

Storey, Lawrence B.; residence, Edwards, Miss. 

Treece, Roscoe S.; residence, Anna, 111. 

Valin, John H.; residence, Centralia, 111. 

Wimberley, Russell A.; residence, Salem, 111. 

Young, James W.; residence, Salem, 111. 

During the Christmas holidays a number of the boys 
were fortunate enough to get furloughs home. Those 
who were not so fortunate decided that they would have 
a merry Christmas anyway, so plans were made for an 
elaborate dinner and a good time. 

On Christmas Day the mess hall was beautifully dec- 
orated with holly and mistletoe, which are found grow- 
ing abundantly near camp. The menu consisted of turkey, 
cranberries, mashed potatoes, pie, cake, oranges and 
nuts. A number of ladies were out from Hattiesburg 
with Mrs. Woolford and Mrs. Watts. After dinner 
Captain Woolford presented the battery with a fine 
Victrola, the gift of old Company I to Battery E. 




CAPTAIN DON L. ESSEX 



BATTERY E 419 

February 1st, 1918, our 1st Sergeant, Albert H. Watts, 
received his commission as 2d Lieutenant and was 
assigned to Battery F. Hayden H. Bear was promoted 
to 1st Sergeant a few days later. 

The evening of July 31st, 1918, will be long remembered 
by all the boys of Battery E. The mess hall was beauti- 
fully decorated by Cattechis, who is an artist in that 
line, and all the cooks put themselves on extra duty to 
prepare a feast that outrivaled any we had ever had. 
It would have been a happy occassion had it not been 
tinged with a feeling of sadness no one could describe. 
Captain Woolford was leaving us and although we had 
no doubt but that we would learn to love any new leader 
that might be given us, still it was hard to part ways 
with the one who had led us from the beginning. 

Lieutenant Walter P. Hayes commanded the battery 
until August 6th, when Captain Don L. Essex was 
assigned as Battery Commander. 

ROSTER OF OFFICERS OF BATTERY E. 

Capt. Horace 0. Woolford, trans. July 31, 1918, as Commanding Officer 

Co. D, Development Battalion, Camp Shelby. 
Capt. Don L. Essex, now commanding battery. 
1st Lieut. Harry H. Cope, trans, to Ft. Bayard, N. Mex., Hospital. 
1st Lieut. Walter P. Hayes, now on duty with battery. 
1st Lieut. Chelsea C. Boone, trans, to Casual Co., Brest, France. 
2d Lieut. John W. Drij^ffs, discharged. 
2d Lieut. Floyd Hodson, trans, to Special Duty overseas. 
2d Lieut. Russel G. Paddock, trans, to Battery F, 139 F. A. 
2d Lieut. George A. Middlemas, trans, to Hq. Co. 139 F. A. 
2d Lieut. Carey S. Stearnes, now on duty with battery. 
2d Lieut. Walter G. Moyle, now on duty with battery. 

Men assigned to Battery E from Camp Shelby Detention Camp, 
Aug. 23, 1918. 
Privates 

Boyd, John T.; residence, Ashland, Ala. 

Braeger, Elmer, residence, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Browninj?, James; residence, Millerville, Ala. 

Campbell, Lawrence, residence. Jay, Fla. 

Chambers, John H.; trans, to Casual Co., Camp Upton. 

Chaplain, August, residence. New Orleans, La. 

Clifton, Jim, residence, trans, to Casual Co., Camp Upton. 

Curlee, William, residence, Birmingham, Ala. 

Duncan, Leiter; residence, Hollywood, Ala. 



420 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Privates 

Dunn, Ollie; residence, Brookhaven, Miss. 
Horiander, Clifford; residence, Jeffersonville, Ind. 
Kennedy, Leamon; residence, Farmerville, Ala. 
Mattigosh, William; residence, Lac Du Flambeau, Wis. 
Moray, John E.; residence. New Orleans, La, 
Morton, Granville; residence, Gurdon, Ark. 
Owens, George F.; trans, to Casual Co., Camp Upton. 
Pitts, Witlon; residence, Clarksdale, Miss. 
Sizemore, Joseph; residence, Ironaton, Ala . 
Snow, Ira G.; residence, Quinton, Ala. 

Snmrall, Stone D.; residence, Collins, Miss.; trans, to Casual Co.. 
Camp Upton. 

The following men were transferred to Casual Co. at Camp Upton, 
New York, October 5, 1918. 

Privates 
Young, James W.; residence, Salem, 111. 
Dillon, Raymond 0.; residence, Du Quoin, 111. 
Chambers, John H.; residence, Gastonburg, Ala. 
Reinhold, Oscar; residence, Waterloo, 111. 
Clifton, Jim ; residence, Humbolt, Tenn. 
Gomillion, Joseph; residence, Harperville, Miss. 
Messerli, Arnold; residence, Alhambra, 111. 
Conant, Charlie; residence, Kinmundy, 111. 
Com, Boscoe; residence, Tipton, Ind. 
Hawley, Robert R.; residence, Westervelt, 111. 
Snmrall, Stone D.; residence, Collins, Miss. 
Wimberley, Russell; residence, Salem, 111. 
Clayton, Joel R,; residence, Wallerville, 111. 
Rutledge, Claude L.; residence. Myrtle, Miss. 

The following men were assigned to the battery at Camp Upton. 
New York, Oct. 5, 1918. 
Hill, Edward; residence, Hamilton, Ohio. 
Chapman, John M.; residence, Sherman, Tex. 
Baysinger, Jack; residence, St. Louis, 111. 
Goss, Arthur; residence, Gardner, 111. 
Kaplan, Morris; residence. Chicago. 111. 
Lucas, James; residence, Chicago, 111. 
Adams, Mike; residence, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
McCoun, Archie; residence, St. Joseph. Mo. 
Honey, Walter; residence, St. Paul, Minn. 
Hobson, Charles; residence, Pratt, Kans. 
Jackson^ Robert; residence, Brookhaven. Miss. 
Treland, Samuel; residence. Chicago, 111. 
(irefr^", Charles; residence, Worland, Wyo. 
Malich, Gustave; residence, Cannelton, Ind. 

The day we reached Liverpool, October 17th, 1918, 
our joy at arriving safe and eluding the submarines 
was turned to sadness by the death of two of our men : 
Wagoner Roscoe S. Treece and Private John J. Schwartz. 
This made a total of only four deaths in Battery E since 



422 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

its organization, Private Paul Jackson having died at 

Camp Shelby February 15th, 1918, and Private Ernest 

Yocum on April 4th, 1918. 

The following men were transferred to the Transport Hospital, 
242, and lost to the battery at Liverpool. 
PriTates Priyate 

Stevens, Tom. Long, William H. 

Duncan, Charles. 
Privates 
Berry, James P., trans, to New Zealand Military Hospital and left 

at Codford, England. 
Querrey, Frank K., trans, to New Zealand Military Hospital and left 

at Codford, England. 
Ja^^rs, Curtlss E., trans, to Base S. O. S. Hospital and left at 
Brest, France. 
Bugler Orville Snyder, trans, to the Transport Hospital on the "George 
Washington." 

Lieut. — "Face the battalion to the rear." 

"Shorty" Carter— "To the rear. Face." 

0. D.— "What are your General Orders?" 

Bay — ^"Sir, mj'- General Orders is as they was." 

Probst — "Over two and under twelve, don't snake eye." 

"Blackjack Joe"— "Pm Bursted." 

"The Sultan"— "Fm all cut and bleeding." 

"Butcher" Jones — "Yes, I know her. I used to shave her 

father." 
Mutt — "All you can see is the sea, but you see lots of sea." 
Stub— "That's deep stuff." 

Mooney — "Hurryup out of there. The ship's torpedoed.** 
Valin— "Haanh?" 
Ike — (Feeling a pair of overalls in the dark) — "Mutt, 

strike me a match and find out what this is. It's the 

most paralyzing thing I ever had hold of." 
Little girl at Lumberton — (Watching us line up for mess) 

— "Oh look Mama, they are going to feed them!" 



battery e 423 

"Kamerad" 
Written by Sergt. Albert E. Sellers, Battery E. 

I 
He calls me **Kamerad" — 

That whining Hun with bloody hands, 

I ought to shoot him where he stands; 

You woman-raper, murderer, brute! 

Aha, you're too damned low to shoot. 
Don't call me "Kamerad" — 

Me who has fought you clean and fair, 

You crucified me pal out there — 
And now you call me "Kamerad!" 

n 

Danny was me pal — 

We hiked together through the Texas sands. 
He took me pack when I could hardly stand 
The last long mile. He nursed me when I fell 
Beneath the caisson and cracked me shell. 

'Twas Danny shared with me — 

His last thin dime, his pack of cigarettes, 
He's gone west now, and went with no regrets, 

You dog! You killed me Comrade. 

HI 

You killed me Danny — 

Danny me pal, me bunkie, all the way 
From the border to the trenches, till the day 
You got him, and you shot him, and he fell. 
You're no "Kamerad" o' mine, you imp o' hell! 

Don't call me ''Kamerad" — 

You're dirty to the core. 
Your hands drip blood, your heart is black 
and more! 

And still you call me "Kamerad!" 



424 



THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 



The committee on prizes and awards was called 
together at Camp Merritt by "General Ike" Keesar and 
the following awards made: 

To: Barber Hal Jones, the Brown Derby for extinguished 
service. 
Cook Carl Coover, The wooden-legged hen. 
Saddler Charles Anger, The wicker ear muffs. 
Burgler Paul Suit, The tin underwear. 
Corporal Buddy Haak, The patent leather shoes. 
Sergeant Al Sellers, The brass watch. 

The Committee then adjourned sine die. 
The Liquid Quartet: 

Malaga Porto Cognac Brryh 

(E. Nay) (Propst) (Moore) (E. Hall) 

"Sug" Wells— (Passing Statue of Liberty)— "This is the 

day of the hour." 
Sergeant Bear — "Form the Battery in two lines. Right 
Face. Forward March. Double Time. Form Column 
of Squads. Battery Halt. Rest." 

"At Ease, Soldiers!" 

m( knames of battery e 



"Varrick" Wykoff. 

"Greasy" Smith, Mess Sergeant. 

"The Saddling Doctor" Anger. 

"Rusty" .Ton^s, 3d Lieutenant. 

"Dummy" Demaree. 

"L. C. S-^^. the bugler mim." 

"Wart" Klein. 

"Big Moon^v" O'Lou^hlin. 

"Liverlip" Schwab. 

"Hoot Puss" Zeaiing. 

"Mutt" Crieamer. 

"Ike" Kee-ar. 

"Nigger" P-^rrick. 

"Deacon" Sellers. 

"Spakbetti" th*^ Wop. 

"Hen" Dillinder. 

"Luckv" Bia^^'^ff. 

"Alabam" Sizemore. 



"Arkansas" Lakey. 

"Scarce hair" Hill. 

"Chuckler" Sandifar. 

"Nippy two stripj^s" Jones. 

"The Sultan" Suit. 

"Friday" Osborne. 

"Jasper" Wood. 

"Stick" McDaniel. 

"Shortv" Cpr+pr. 

"Snageritis" Hall 

"Yohnny" Yobnson. 

"Biscuit" Reed. 

"Stub" Jackson. 

"Moss Back" Lawson. 

"Big Un" Chapman. 

"Tbe Miik^«n" Wells. 

"Gold Brick Brothers" Nay and Nay. 



426 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Jasper — "He was looking for you, Hoot." 

Hoot— "Who? 'who?" 

Jasper — "Somebody tell him. I haven't got the heart." 



Battery F, 139th Field Artillery 

Written in Camp de Meucon, France, by DeForest O'Dell, 

Francis M. Lineback, Louis S. Grohs, Frank 

M. Sanders, Alfred J. Webb, Dean 

W. Fuller, Ray C. Rutherford 

In the composition of Battery F, 139th Field Artillery, 
are to be found several different elements. The original 
battery was made up of two organizations: Company K, 
4th Indiana Infantry, Indiana National Guard, and Troop 
B, 1st Separate Squadron Cavalry, Indiana National 
Guard. From time to time transfers and discharges were 
replaced by draft from the local National Army Deten- 
tion Camp. As time went on and the men of these sep- 
arate units were mingled together, lived side by side, ate 
the same grub and did the same work, all former dis- 
tinctions disappeared, and out of the mold came the one 
unit — Battery F. 

Troop B and Company K possess histories of their 
existence before they became a part of Battery F, which 
are cherished by all their former members. Both organ- 
izations were recruited in Indianapolis shortly after the 
declaration of war on Germany. 




CAPTAIN WILL T. STALNAKER 



COMPANY K 

The organizers of Company K were: Nathaniel N. 
Bernstein, a young attorney and the deputy prosecutor 
for Marion County; Ferdinand L. Adams, commission 
merchant; Patrick Gerry, college student; W. E. Alberts- 
myer, a local credit man; and Louis S. Grohs, wholesale 
jeweler, all of whom were of Indianapolis. The organ- 
izers hoped to have all the members of Company K 
Indianapolis men, but so many different organizations 
were recruiting in the city at the same time that this 
was impossible. Recruiting tours were then made through- 
out the State. 

A recruiting station was opened in the Occidental 
Building. The next step necessary was to provide some- 
thing other than a sign calling for volunteers. Accordingly 
a Victrola was placed in the room and a few days later 
a player piano was secured. Signs, placards and posters 
soon gave the recruiting office a more significant 
appearance. 

With all these incidentals taken care of the organizers 
next considered the question of a name or slogan under 
which the unit might become more widely known. It 
was decided that in honor of the Governor of the State, 
the company would be known as "The Goodrich Guards, 
The Governor's Own." The new slogan was circulated 
freely throughout the State during the early weeks of 
the campaign. 

Nathaniel Bernstein was commissioned Captain on July 
5th, 1917, and immediately took charge of the company, 
and Patrick Gerry was commissioned 1st Lieutenant and 
assigned to the unit. W. E. Albertsmyer was made 
1st Sergeant. 



430 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

The first drills of the company were held on South 
Illinois street, between Washington street and the Union 
Station. Temporary non-commissioned officers were 
assigned, and the rudiments of close order drill were 
taught the men. 

On July 11th, a dance was given at Brennecke's 
Dancing Academy for the purpose of advertising more 
widely the new unit and for raising a company fund. 
A similar dance was given in Connersville, Indiana, on 
July 29th. In this manner over $300.00 was raised and 
a large number of supporters gained for the organization. 

The recruiting campaign was continued throughout 
the summer. By August 1st an even hundred men had 
been enlisted. At this time Captain Bernstein was 
relieved of his command and Captain W. T. Stalnaker, 
our present Battery Commander, took charge. Lieut. 
Gerry was also relieved of his duties with the company. 

On August 5th, in answer to the Federal call, Company 
K joined the regiment at the State Fair Grounds and 
quarters were established in the Fine Arts Hall. 1st 
Lieutenant Ora B. Keller and 2d Lieutenant William A. 
Kreber were then assigned to the company and Wilson 
McGuire replaced W. E. Albertsmyer as 1st Sergeant. 

Here the men received their first initiation into army 
life. They learned to like army grub, stand K. P., and 
found out that sleeping on straw with one blanket was 
hardship not to be equalled elsewhere. 

On August 19th the following warrants were made: 
Sergeants — Louis S. Grohs, Frank L. McAllister, John 
C. Dwyer, Richard Valentine, Robert 0. McCray; Cor- 
porals — Robert M. Socwell, W. E. Albertsmyer, Raymond 
E. Quilleon, Charles E. Styers, Edgar G. Hancock, 
Lawrence P. Branaman, Lanice 0. Grimes, Jacob W. 
Meyer. 



BATTERY F 431 

At this time Company K*s song first came into prom- 
inence. The author, supposed to be a member of the 
unit, has never been found. The song caught the ear 
of all who heard it and brought Company K more into the 
limelight : 

Hurrah for Company K, 

She's a fine gang, 

Hurrah for Company K, 
The finest in the land 
Company K's a daisy 

She'll set the Kaiser crazy. 
Ein, zwei, drei, fier. 
Company K has no fear. 
Hurrah for Company K, 

She's a fine gang. 

On a rainy day, August 28th, the regiment was ordered 
to Fort Benjamin Harrison. Camp was pitched on a 
large field southeast of Camp Headquarters. Here the 
men were taught close and extended order and battalion 
maneuvers were practiced. 

Camp was broken on September 25th, when the order 
was received which sent the regiment to Camp Shelby, 
Mississippi. Early on the morning of September 29th 
the men of Company K received their first sight of their 
new home. By this time the rain jinx seemed to have 
fairly attached itself to the regiment. The men were 
convinced that the South was not all "Sunshine and Roses." 
The regiment detrained and hiked to Camp No. 8 and 
camp was immediately pitched. 

On October 1st the order was received in which the 
4th Indiana Infantry was changed into the 139th U. S. 
Field Artillery. Company K was held intact and trans- 
ferred to Battery F. 



TROOP B 

Within a week from the start of the recruiting cam- 
paign, Troop B was at peace strength. On April 14th, 
at the Virginia Avenue Armory, the troop was mustered 
into State service with Cortez J. Cobler as Captain, 
Frank E. Long, 1st Lieutenant, and Edward N. Johnson, 
2d Lieutenant, all of Indianapolis. Drills were conducted 
here for several weeks when troop headquarters were 
moved to the Coliseum at the State Fair Grounds. 
Temporary non-commissioned officers were selected and 
drills were held on Monday and Thursday evenings, 
with non-commissioned officers' school on Friday night. 

The troop expected to be called into service at any time, 
so many men gave up their jobs in anticipation of the call. 

The troop was finally ordered out on August 5th. 
Every man in the outfit said "Good-bye" to the home 
folks, packed his grip and headed for the Fair Grounds. 
At this time the young troopers firmly believed war was 
all that Sherman said it was, for sleeping on cement 
walks, hard floors and benches with no blankets, left 
much to be desired. The first army mess wasn't half 
bad but somehow something seemed lacking. Stomachs 
were tender after having been subject so long to "home 
grown" food. 

A full corps of non-commissioned officers was then 
warranted as follows: 1st Sergeant, Charles H. Ogle; 
Mess Sergeant, Garrison Winders; Supply Sergeant, 
Oscar J. Pool ; Stable Sergeant, Robert L. Metsker ; Guidon 
Sergeant, Fred Hileman; Sergeants, Walter W. Shields, 
DeForest O'Dell, Hugh McKinney and Ralph W. Harting; 
Corporals, Francis V. Rice, Halford L. Johnson, Lawrence 



434 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

G. Conover, Dean W. Fuller, Edwin G. Haverstick, Fre- 
mont F. Keller, Frank M. Sanders and Henry A. Harris. 

The troop stood Federal muster on August 8th. The 
men started to buy uniforms and cavalry equipment. 
However no one purchased riding crops or saddles Broom- 
sticks would have been more appropriate. 

During these days many of the men who lived in the 
city slept at home and reported each morning for drill 
call at 7:30. All calls sounded alike then, for Buglers Fox 
and Ulrey hadn't reached their stride. 

The remainder of August was spent in the Coliseum. 
On September 1st the squadron, minus A Troop, of 
Evansville, moved to the northwest corner of the Fair 
Grounds and pitched the first squadron camp. 

Those were happy, care-free days. The drills occupied 
but few hours each day. The men then listened to a few 
lectures, stood retreat and were then dismissd until 
11 p. m. During the State Fair the squadron received 
a large number of passes to the Fair, and frequent holi- 
days were granted. Rest assured, the troopers made the 
most of these last days at home. 2d Lieutenant Johnson 
was transferred to squadron headquarters and made 
Squadron Supply Officer. 

On September 12th orders were received to move to 
a southern training camp. The following day the three 
troops boarded the train at the Fair Grounds, bade their 
relatives, wives and sweethearts "Good-bye" and pulled 
out. After a long, weary trip they arrived at Hatties- 
burg, Mississippi, and Camp Shelby, on September 14th, 
their home for a year. The unit detrained and hiked to 
Camp 10, where camp was pitched. 

Since the squadron was among the first units to arrive 
in Camp Shelby, plenty of work was found awaiting 



BATTERY F 435 

them. Few hours were spent in drill, long periods were 
spent in grubbing stumps, grading streets, draining 
swamps and building bridges. At times the men wondered 
if they were a part of the labor battalion. During the 
second week in Camp Shelby news was received to the 
effect that cavalry was no longer wanted and that the 
squadron would no doubt be transferred into the infantry. 
This took all the joy out of life and glum faces were 
much in evidence. The long dreaded day finally arrived 
and Troop B became the 14th Company, Training Bat- 
talion, 63d Depot Brigade. 

For a week the men remained doughboys, and then, 
on October 5th, the sun shone through. Troop B was 
transferred intact to the 139th Field Artillery, a horse- 
drawn six-inch howitzer regiment. With light hearts the 
ex-troopers packed their equipment and hiked over to 
Camp 8 to become a part of Battery F. 

Captain Cobler was made Adjutant of the 3d Battalion 
and 1st Lieutenant Long was assigned to Battery F. 

Battery F 

October 4th, 1917, to June 1st, 1918 
With the fusion of Company K and Troop B, Battery 
F began a sixteen weeks course of training. Starting with 
road hikes before breakfast the men were kept on the 
jump until retreat. It was close order drill with rifles, 
bayonet training, road hikes, gas drill, equitation and 
gun drill around the dummy howitzers. 

Among the regimental instructors detailed from Battery 
F during this first period of training were Sergeant 
Frederick L. Killen, in bayonet training; Sergeant Robert 
L. Metsker, in equitation; Sergeant Charles H. Ogle, in 
gas drill. Killen and Ogle caused their class much dis- 



BATTERY F 437 

comfort by their courses of instruction but it remained 
for Metsker to cause them to look unfavorably on the 
mounted service. A few of the men from the farm rode 
well, but for the most part the regiment rode all the 
way from neck to tail. 

A dark pall overtook the battery on October 15th, when 
Cook Harry Blassig was drowned in Leaf River, a few 
miles from camp. 

On November 8th the order was received which trans- 
ferred the regiment to a motorized unit. No tears were 
in evidence as the horses of the 139th were led out on 
the way to the Remount Station. 

During the second week in November measles and 
mumps broke out in the battery, and a quarantine was 
placed on the unit. The diseases were soon under control 
and the battery had no casualties. 

The most important in the training schedule was the 
detailing of the non-commissioned officers of the regiment 
to attend a school at the 4th Field Artillery, then sta- 
tioned at Camp Shelby. This training began the second 
week in November and extended over a period of nine 
weeks, the N. C. O.'s being divided into classes of three 
weeks each. Here was the first real test of hard work 
for the N. C. O.'s. No distinction was made as to rank. 
It was a common sight to see the "Top Kick" working 
along side a corporal cleaning picks or grooming mules. 

The two bright lights of November and December were 
the Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners. If one had 
looked in on the mess hall at these times he would have 
thought he was in a large banquet hall. The dinners them- 
selves are long to be remembered. All the turkey that 
could be eaten and everything that went with it, even 
to cranberry sauce and mince pie, were on the menu. 



438 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Entertainments were provided after each of the dinners 
by the men of the battery. Colonel and Mrs. Moor- 
head and the Colonel's Staff were the guests of honor 
at the Christmas dinner. The credit for the decorations 
and appearance of the mess hall at both events must 
be given to Chief Mechanic Robert W. Bromley, better 
known throughout the regiment as "Skipper." 

On January 8th Captain Stalnaker was ordered to 
Fort Sill, Oklahoma, to attend the School of Fire, and 
1st Lieutenant Long took command of the battery. 

On January 13th the call was sounded for men to attend 
the Officers' Training Camp at Leon Springs, Texas. 
Our battery furnished five men, which was about twenty- 
five per cent, of the quota for the regiment. The men 
selected were: 1st Sergt. Wilson McGuire, Sergt. Robert 
0. McCray, Sergt. Charles H. Ogle, Corp. Edwin G. Haver- 
stick and Corp. Halford L. Johnson. Sergeants McGuire 
and McCray and Corporal Johnson received commissions 
as 2d Lieutenants. Samuel Kramer, a former Company 
K man, who was sent to this camp from the Divisional 
Military Police, was also commissioned 2d Lieutenant. 

1st Class Private Alvin L. Chaunsey was transferred 
to the Reclamation Department on January 18th, and 
shortly afterward commissioned 2d Lieutenant and sent 
to France. 

Hugh McKinney was made 1st Sergeant on January 
20th. Shortly afterward Frank Hill was warranted 
Corporal and made Battery Clerk. Mess Sergeant McAllis- 
ter was transferred to the Quartermaster Corps and 
Barnett Breedlove became Mess Sergeant. 

At this time the battery lost two of its most efficient 
and best liked officers. 2d Lieut. Justus Paul, 2d Lieut. 
Edward Englehart were ordered overseas. 



BATTERY F 439 

Battery F soon began to realize that it possessed a 
great deal of pugilistic ability in August Klenke, middle- 
weight; Earl Hensley, lightweight, and Bobbie Lee, 
featherweight. Throughout the winter these men had 
boxed at the "Y" shows over the camp. 

On February 22d, Klenke entered the Divisional Box- 
ing Championship Tourney and carried off the honors 
by defeating Peter Williams, of the 137th Field Artillery. 
Klenke was presented with a gold medal by Major General 
Sage, then Divisional Commander. 

Klenke and Hensley then entered in the New Orleans 
Championship tournament, which was held on February 
25th. After three rounds of easy fighting, Klenke was 
victorious over Jacob Stahl, of New Orleans. Hensley 
won by default. 

With two notable victories to his credit, Klenke went 
to Birmingham, Alabama, on March 1st and fought Bity 
Walters, of Camp McClellan, Alabama, for the Southern 
Championship. Walters succombed to a blow in the left 
jaw during the third round, and Klenke was declared 
Southern Middleweight Champion. 

In those days a six-inch howitzer regiment carried 
rifles, so it was necessary to fire a twenty-one day course 
on the rifle range. Even though it was a heavy artillery 
regiment, the 139th carried off the Divisional honors by 
qualifying twenty per cent, of the entire regiment as 
marksmen, while only ten per cent, of the doughboys 
could qualify. 

By this time the men had become fully convinced that 
the "sixteen week's course of intensive training" was a 
farce and that they were doomed to remain indefinitely 
in Camp Shelby. 

On March 10th the second death occurred within the 
battery. Victor Blankenship died at the Base Hospital. 



440 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

On April 15th it was announced that two men would 
go from the regiment to attend the Engineer Officers' 
Training Camp at Camp Lee, Virginia. Corp. Lawrence 
Con over, of Battery F, was one of the men selected. He 
was commissioned 1st Lieutenant six weeks after the 
training started. 

The first real hike with heavy packs was taken about 
the first day of May. The regiment left camp at 7 a. m., 
on April 29th, and hiked to Black Creek, a distance of 
about twelve miles, arriving there at one o'clock. 

After pitching camp and eating dinner, (and surely 
the "bully beef" was as good as chicken) the men went 
over to the creek and had a good swim. About four 
o'clock it started raining and continued throughout the 
night. Indeed, sleeping in pup tents during a hard rain 
was no pleasure, but the men went through it in the 
best of spirits. 

Camp was broken early the next morning, and the 
return trip made without a man falling out. 

On May 29th the regiment made preparations for a 
five day hike. Nine Quad trucks had just been received, 
so good transportation for supplies was assured. 

At one o'clock on the afternoon of May 29th, the regi- 
ment left Camp Shelby and hiked to Black Creek, where 
camp was pitched for the night. 

Reveille sounded at four o'clock the next morning and 
in an hour the men were on the road. Purvis, Mississippi, 
was reached at nine o'clock. A rest of an hour was taken 
here. The men then hiked to a site about three miles 
out where dinner was cooked, and a rest taken until 
three o'clock. A large spring nearby afforded a bountiful 
supply of water. 



BATTERY F 441 

Again on the road, the regiment hiked to Lumberton, 
Mississippi, arriving there about six o'clock. They were 
a tired and dirty bunch of men but were still able to 
sing, "We are on our way to Berlin, and we'll get 
there." Twenty-two miles had been covered that day. 

The next day was a day of rest. A parade was given 
that evening for the townsfolk who had given the regi- 
ment such a royal welcome. 

Early the next morning the men were out on their 
way for a seventeen mile hike into Brooklyn, Mississippi. 
The roads were rather bad but Brooklyn was reached 
by six o'clock that evening. As in all other towns passed 
through, the entire populace turned out. Camp was 
pitched just north of town, and everyone turned in early, 
for ten miles lay between them and Camp Shelby. 

Early the next morning packs were made and the 
start was made for camp. A slow pace was taken all the 
way and arrived at Camp Shelby at eleven o'clock. 

The men were a tired lot, but were all glad they had 
taken the hike. It had been the first real test and they 
had all stood it well. They all felt that they were better 
soldiers for having actually hiked sixty-two miles in 
three days. 



June 3rd, 1918, to September 19th, 1918. 

Sunday afternoon, June 3rd, was about the most quiet 
that was ever known to Battery F. The sixty-two mile 
hike which the men had just finished had taken away 
about all the pep which the men otherwise displayed on 
Sundaj^s. There were some who were still able to recall 
events which ocurred along the "line of march," others 
who were doctoring sore and blistered feet, now and 
then uttering soft oaths such as "hikes are foolish- 
ness anyway," but from the majority, the big majority, 
there was not a murmur, for they were stretched out 
on their cots, enjoying the first real sleep in four days. 
Even that night the Officer of the Day, if he made his 
rounds, which is still and always will be a question of 
doubt, found no lights burning in any of the tents, for 
long before taps Battery F, and in fact the whole 139th 
were, for once anyhow, good and obedient soldiers after 
taps. 

The following week will always remain in the minds 
of the boys, for on Wednesday they witnessed the depart- 
ure of the first troops from the regiment for service 
in France. These boys had been picked out early in May, 
and had a hard time of it for a few weeks getting accus- 
tomed to their heavy pack, and drilling in their 0. D.'s. 
But that day when they were assembled on the parade 
ground, there was many a lad who wished he was one 
of them, who envied their going to fight the Hun, while 
he still remained to do the same old "squads right." And 
as the boys left the parade grounds and headed for the 
station, the jinx of the 139th was still following them, 
for they had not gone far when rain overtook them and 
they reached their train drenched. Outside of losing 



BATTERY F 443 

many good enlisted men, Battery F lost 1st Lieut. George 
S. Sutton, who had been with the battery since the 
preceding November and who had won a place in the 
hearts of all the boys as an efficient officer and as a 
real man. 

The rest of that week Battery F went around somewhat 
in a daze, for after the departure of the fifty-eight men 
in the Replacement Draft, a sort of reaction set in. 
2d Lieut. Harley F. Hines was then assigned to the 
batterj\ 

During the second week in June Battery F sent five 
men to the Artillery Officers' Training Camp, at Camp 
Shelby. All five were commissioned in August. 

The following week Corp. Jacob Meyer was transferred 
to Headquarters Company and warranted Sergeant-Major. 

The next few weeks affairs livened up and the boys 
found their spirits again, as rumors began to fly thick 
and fast that the 139th itself had received orders to 
prepare for going overseas. About this time the regi- 
ment received two 4.7-inch howitzers, and the men were 
soon making frequent trips to the artillery range for 
actual experience in firing. Needless to say, the men 
took hold of this new work with great interest, as they 
all had longed for the day when they would hear the 
sound of a cannon. Battery F produced four gun squads 
which were the equal of any in the regiment. 

The week of June 17th found interest still high, as 
preparations were still going forward for leaving Camp 
Shelby. Details were sent over to the warehouses, and 
overcoats and wool suits were brought back, only to be 
held in the Supply Tent. But these preparations, together 
with rumors which kept coming in, tended to further 
the spirit and discipline of the battery. On Monday the 



444 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

battery received a number of men from the Detention 
Camp, who came to fill up the vacancies left by the 
Replacement boys. They came at an inopportune time 
for themselves, as the old men were all full of pep, and 
they started out to whip them into shape in short order. 
For the few weeks following, these men spent the greater 
part of their time on the parade ground, doing close 
order drill, signalling and extended order, to say nothing 
of the numerous road hikes. Credit should be given to 
both instructor and recruit, for from the start the new 
men caught the enthusiasm of the regiment, and worked 
hard. In a short time a great improvement was shown, 
although all the men worked hard during drill hours, 
they still had strength enough left after the evening 
mess to run to the old ball grounds and many a close 
game was played between "Red" Allen's "Bulls of the 
Woods" and Barney Breedlove's "All Stars," and sev- 
eral times did the umpire have to make a hasty retreat, 
followed by the angry mob. 

The latter part of June and the first of July found 
Camp Shelby hot, with no rain, and the spirits of the 
men went down as the thermometer went up, for the 
news was circulated that the orders for leaving had been 
rescinded. This naturally caused a little let-down in the 
spirits of the men. However, at this time the regiment 
came into possession of a battery of three-inch guns, 
so the trips to the Artillery Range became more numerous 
and the men were given a variation from the old routine 
of the daily drills. It was on the eighth of July that the 
first of the maneuvers of the 38th Division took place. 
The battery stood reveille at 4:00 a. m., and marched 
a distance of three miles to a point north of the camp 
and took up a position among the rough pine woods of 



BATTERY F 445 

Mississippi. The notable feature of the maneuver was 
that every regiment in the whole Division took part in 
the maneuver. The boys received their first touch of 
going into action under battle conditions, as no one was 
allowed to smoke or talk. But with all this they held 
up very well, amid clouds of dust which made the march 
most uncomfortable. 

The following week saw the appearance of the new 
1918 model army rifle, so all of the men had to make 
another hike to the rifle range, as the entire regiment 
was required to fire again. The hike was made on Wednes- 
day, July 17th, and three warm days were spent there, 
the return trip being made late Saturday evening in 
record time over the roads inches thick with fine 
Mississippi dust. 

On July 18th the second of the Divisional Maneuvers 
was held. This time the march was put forward an hour 
earlier, and it was plain to be seen that the boys had 
benefitted greatly from their first experience, as much 
less trouble was encountered. These first two maneuvers 
were held as sort of preliminaries for the third and last, 
which came about a week later. The last one was by far 
the biggest affair ever attempted by the 38th Division. 
This time the battery arose at 1:00 a. m., and the two 
four-point-seven howitzers, hauled by big trucks, were 
taken along. The regiment reached its position long 
before daybreak and was soon in position. Zero hour 
was set for 6:00 a. m., and when it came, many of the 
boys were taken by surprise and imagined they were in 
the midst of a battle in France. Rifles, machine guns, 
trench mortars, three-inch rifles and our own howitzers 
all let loose at the same time, and many of the people 
of Hattiesburg were roused from peaceful slumber by 



446 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

the sound of the guns. It was quite a deHcate and danger- 
ous operation, as the infantry had to advance under the 
barrage of the artillery. The maneuver was successful 
and no accident occurred whatsoever. 

On Monday, the fifth day of August, Battery F had 
their first taste of nightfiring. Early in the morning they 
hiked to the Combat Range and spent the greater part 
of the day digging gun emplacements and camouflaging 
the positions. It was at this time that the Battery Com- 
manders Detail discovered that they played quite an 
important part in artillery work. The Signal Section, 
especially, found out that their work was no mere child's 
play, as they walked many miles that night laying com- 
munication lines. At this time 1st Lieut. Robert H. 
McKinley was assigned to the battery. 

The latter part of this same week saw another addition 
to Battery F — four boys coming from the 2d Indiana 
Field Artillery to join the ranks of the battery. On 
August 15th twenty-one more men were added to the 
battery, and then was formed the famous "Q" Battery, 
made up of all the new men who had come into the regi- 
ment during the summer. Non-commissioned officers were 
assigned to give these men their first instructions. Every- 
one will remember the first parade of "Q" Battery, before 
they had received any drilling, but soon the men too made 
fast and excellent progress and were graduated into 
Battery F. 

News was then received that Robert Metsker, for- 
merly Stable Sergeant of Battery F, had been com- 
missioned 2d Lieutenant in the Remount Service. 

During these warm summer months the 139th con- 
ceived the plan of giving vaudeville entertainments in 
the spacious band-stand on the parade ground for the 



BATTERY P 447 

benefit of the men of the regiment. At all of these enter- 
tainments Battery F was alwaj^s called upon to con- 
tribute, and it never failed to respond. The ''Rusty Hinge" 
quartet, composed of "Jack" Schaefer, Howard Niblack, 
"Bob" Socwell and Guy Hancock, proved to be a favorite 
at all times. Herman Stevason came in for plenty of 
applause with his Charlie Chaplin imitation. As usual, 
the three boxers, Earl Hensley, Bobbie Lee and "Gus" 
Klenke furnished plenty of entertainment. 

Again were the spirits of the men aroused when reports 
came in that the 139th was again to prepare for over- 
seas service. Many were skeptical, as they had been 
fooled before. On Wednesday, September 4th, the regi- 
ment started out for a two days maneuver near "Bunker 
Hill." They moved out on motor trucks late in the after- 
noon, picked out the sector where the operations were 
to take place, and then pitched shelter tents and turned 
in. Early the next morning the boys were awakened by 
a bugle call which was a combination of reveille, pay- 
day and "soupy", but what the bugler said was a" perfect 
rendition of mess-call. Soon everyone was at his post, 
the gun squads were digging their gun emplacements 
and the signel section had just established its lines 
of communications, when an orderly arrived with orders 
to return immediately to camp in order to complete the 
preparations for leaving. Without doubt the return hike 
was the noisiest and the fastest that Battery F ever took 
part in, for everyone knew that their days in Camp 
Shelby were fast drawing to a close. 

On reaching camp Captain Stalnaker, Lieutenant Hines, 
Corporal Fuller and Chief Mechanic Robert W. Bromley 
were ordered overseas immediately, as a part of the 38th 
Division Advance Party. The remainder of the battery 



448 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

spent the following week in making final inspections for 
leaving. 

The 19th of September, 1918, was a memorable day 
for the members of Battery F, 139th Field Artillery, for 
it was then that they began to see a realization of their 
dream of active service in France. Orders were received 
on September 6th to prepare to leave Camp Shelby for 
a Port of Embarkation. 

At 5:30 p. m., on September 19th the train carrying 
the 3rd Battalion left Camp Shelby. Never were men so 
happy as were the men of the two batteries as they 
started on the first leg of a journey which was to carry 
them over 5,000 miles from their homes. 

The train was made up of standard Pullmans, tourist 
and kitchen cars, quite in contrast to the conveyances 
to carry the same soldiers inland when they arrived at 
their French port. 

The train sped northward and reached Meridian, 
Mississippi, at ten o'clock. Here the men of the battery 
were given their first introduction to the canteen service 
of the American Red Cross. 

From Meridian, the troops were taken to Birmingham, 
Alabama. The men detrained here, and marched through 
the streets for exercise. 

From Birmingham the route took the men eastward to 
Atlanta, Georgia, when a second detrainment was made 
and another march taken. 

From Atlanta the Seaboard Line was followed north- 
ward to Raleigh, North Carolina. All along the line the 
Red Cross continued to feed the men coffee, sandwiches 
and apples and to keep them well supplied with cigarettes. 
At Raleigh the men were paraded through the streets 
and given twenty minutes liberty. On the way back to 



BATTERY F 449 

the train the battery was taken to the canteen head- 
quarters of the Red Cross and given the usual feed. 

The troops were a bit disappointed upon reaching 
Washington, D. C, for they were confident that no less 
a personage than the President himself would review 
the fighting 139th. As it was, the men disembarked 
in the outskirts of the town and were given calisthenics 
on a field which lay within the limits of the army camp 
of the city. 

Baltimore, Maryland, Wilmington, Delaware, Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania, and Trenton, New Jersey, were 
hurriedly passed through and finally Jersey City was 
reached. Here the battery left the train and crossed 
the Hudson River by ferry to the Long Island Terminal 
where they received another feed from the American 
Red Cross, after they had boarded the trains preparatory 
to proceeding to Camp Upton, Long Island. 

The stay at Camp Upton from September 22d to 
October 5th was one of much enjoyment and pleasure. 
The boys knew that their time in the good old U. S. A. 
was limited and they made the best of the time which 
was afforded them. A limited per cent, of the battery 
received passes to New York City where, according to 
all report, they made the people of even such a cos- 
mopolitan city as New York is said to be, acquainted 
with the 139th F. A. Those members of the battery 
who were so unfortunate as to be unable to secure 
passes to the largest city in the States, made the camp 
and surrounding towns lively. 

It was while at Camp Upton that the battery received 
its overseas equipment. This equipment consisted of 
clothing only, for it was understood that the material 
of the battery was to be procured when the organization 



450 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

arrived in France. The epidemic of Spanish influenza 
was in full sway while the battery was quartered in 
Upton and it was due to this disease that a number 
of well liked and very efficient men were lost from the 
battery roster. Word has since been received to the 
effect that all have recovered, although when the battery 
sailed the men were too ill to accompany the regiment. 

Reveille was blown at 3 a. m., on the morning of 
October 6th and mess followed immediately. Packs were 
rolled and the battery left camp at 5 a. m., enroute to 
the port. New York City was reached at 7 a. m., and 
after ferrying across the river, Pier No. 57 of the 
White Star Line hove into view where the steamer 
"Cedric" was boarded. The boys were given their last 
view of the Goddess of Liberty at 5 :30 p. m., and then 
the journey really began. 

The entire 139th was on board and had as fellow 
passengers a battalion of Ordnance Troops, together 
with some 1000 or so dusky members of a Pioneer Regi- 
ment. It was the last named that furnished the enter- 
tainment for the remainder of the men on board. Many 
were the prayer meetings and song festivals provided 
by our dark complexioned brothers. 

The boys stood the journey in great shape despite 
the accompanying hardships which they were forced to 
endure. The most objectionable feature of the journey 
was the "mess,** which was served to us by members of 
the English crew. The big feature of the feed seemed 
to be the absence of seasoning of any description, par- 
ticularly salt. The men were also somewhat inconvenienced 
by the order compelling them to wear their life belts at 
all times and also by the necessity of not having lights 
or allowing smoking on the upper decks after dark. 



BATTERY F 451 

On the evening of October 16th, 1918, while about ten 
hours out from Liverpool, the passengers of the "Cedric" 
were furnished quite a bit of excitement some time around 
10:30 p. m. While everyone was preparing to retire, the 
ship v/as suddenly shaken by what appeared to be a 
violent concussion. A second shock followed immediately, 
upon which the boat whistle blew the signal announcing 
the sighting of a submarine. Everyone made his way 
to his position near the life boats in a very orderly 
manner. The general supposition was that the boat had 
been torpedoed, but nevertheless she proceeded to port 
on her own steam. Due to the strict censorship which 
surrounded all the movements of the regiment, the real 
nature of the disturbance has never been disclosed. 

After debarking at Liverpool on October 18th the 
battery proceeded immediately by train to the rest camp 
at Codford, Wilts, England. Here the battery remained 
until October 21st, at which time they were transported 
to Southampton. After remaining on the docks at 
Southampton all day it fell to the lot of Battery F to 
cross the Channel on the packet "Maid of Orleans," a 
new, ill-fated vessel. The steamer proceeded to leave 
harbor at full speed and she had been under way about 
thirty-five minutes when she rammed a large freighter. 
The accident proved to be quite serious since the port 
side of the "Maid of Orleans" was raked and torn the 
full length of the vessel from just above the water line 
to the upper decks. Falling beams and ship's davits 
caused a number of men to be painfully if not seriously 
hurt. Battery F still had the "Goddess of Fortune" with 
it for it suffered few casualties. The most seriously 
injured of the men were Damon Johnson and George 
Hawley and it was necessary to leave them at a hospital 



452 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

in England. Immediately after the accident the "Maid 
of Orleans" put back into port. Battery F spent the 
night in a rest camp, which was reached after a hike of 
four miles. 

The next evening the battery was more successful and 
enjoyed a safe voyage on the "Archangel" and debarked 
in Cherbourg, France, October 23rd, 1918. The usual 
hike was in order and the five miles to camp was made 
in great shape. The battery only remained in the rest 
camp for a few hours, as the regiment moved the same 
evening after having hiked to the railroad station in 
Cherbourg. 

The journey from Cherbourg proved to be the most 
disagreeable the battery had ever experienced. The men 
were loaded into box cars which were labeled "Hommes 
36-40, Chevaux 8." Some of the cars had as many as 
fifty-one men in them and it was in this cramped posi- 
tion that the men traveled for twenty-six hours. The 
route taken, when traced on the map, was of a horseshoe 
shape. Le Mans was the largest city through which the 
course of the journey carried the battery. After leaving 
Le Mans, the train reached the city of Ploermel and 
the troops were unloaded. 

The battery was quartered in Ploermel from October 
24th to November 9th and carried on a drill schedule 
consisting of hikes and "squads right" and "squads left." 
The time spent in Ploermel was one of enjoyment and 
education. The boys had their first real insight into the 
mode of living and character of the French and many 
were the ideals that were shattered even though the 
bonds between the French and the Americans was closer 
drawn. Notwithstanding the enjoyment derived from 
Ploermel, the boys were eager to get into a permanent 



454 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

camp and to carry out the training schedule which had 
been laid down for them. On the day of November 8th 
a farewell parade for the special benefit of the people 
of Ploermel was given. 

Camp de Meucon was designated as the place in which 
the final touches were to be put on the training of the 
battery before they were sent to the front. So November 
9th, orders having been received stating there were 
quarters available, the battery began the march with 
heavy packs to Meucon. After covering nine and one 
half miles in three and three quarters hours, the battery 
was picked up by trucks and rode the remainder of the 
twenty-seven miles into camp. The first evening was 
spent in temporary barracks, since the permanent quar- 
ters had not as yet been vacated by the 110th F. A. But 
as soon as that regiment proceeded to the front, Battery 
F moved into what was to be their home for some time. 

The prearranged training schedule was taken up and 
the battery began to receive full equipment. Gas masks 
and a number of 155mm pieces were issued. The time 
when the battery was to see action seemed to be near 
at hand when the world was startled and made glad by 
the signing of the armistice. Soon after this Battery F 
began to turn in the equipment which they had possessed 
for so short a time. On November 21st the battery was 
on the range and fired their last shot of the war. From 
that time to this, thoughts of the war having been laid 
aside, rosy thoughts of home have taken their place. 

With the regiment at Camp de Meucon, France, our 
history closes. From this time to the day of demobiliza- 
tion the events will have to be supplied by the r^ader. 

At present all indications point to a departure within 
forty-eight hours to Brest, an eventful ocean voyage, the 
checking of our property, and at last, our discharges. 



1ST LT. RUSSELL G. PADDOCK 
2ND LT. HARLEY P. HINES 



1ST LT. LOUIS H. BIELER 
2ND LT. SAMUEL H. HENDERSON 



456 THE STORY OP THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

In recounting these experiences the attempt has been 
made to dwell upon the more important occurrences of 
our army life. 

It is safe to predict that before many weeks have 
elapsed, the officers and men of the 139th Field Artillery 
will have gone back to civil life. With the demobilization 
will go the routine and all that for the past year and 
a half have made up our life from day to day. But there 
are certain things which never can vanish. The loyal 
friendships which have been molded during these days 
of service will endure even to the time when the sound 
of "Fall In" is but a faint memory. 

With the hope that in years to come Battery F men 
who read this may recall the joys and sorrows experienced 
by them and their bunkies, this history is being written. 
If but one of them is made the least bit happier by these 
recollections, this work shall not have been in vain. 

ROSTER OF BATTERY F, 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY. 
January, 1919. 

Capt Will T. Stalnaker, residence, Indianapolis, Ind.; trans. Dec. 12, 
1918, to Motor Trans. Corps Brest, France. 

1st Lieut. Rnssell G. Paddock, residence, Connersvillo, ind. 

Ist Lieut. Louis H. Bleler, residence, Indianapolis, Ind. 

2d Lieut Harley F. Hines, residence, Texas. 

2d Lieut. Samuel H. Henderson, residence, Talladega, Ala. 

1st Sergt. Hugh McKinney; residence, 2701 Washington avenue, St 
Louis, Mo. 

Mess Serfft Bamett W. Breedlove; residence, 2221 Main street, Ander- 
son, Ind. 

Sup. Sergt. Louis S. Grohs; residence, 3221 Park avenue, Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

Sergt Deforest OT)ell; residence, 3406 Roosevelt avenue, Indianapo- 
lis, Ind. 

Serj^t, Charles R. Ogle; residence, 1321 Roach street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Ser^ Edwin G. Haverstlck; residence, M-1, Box No. 41, Indianapo- 
lis, Ind. 

Ser^ Alfred J. Webb; residence, 1811 Ludlow avenue, Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

Ser^ Henry A. Harris; residence, 709 North Massachusetts avenue, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

Serprt Homer Foist; residence. Box No. 94, Seymour, Ind. 

Serjirt Ray Allen; residence, 226 Bright street, Indianapolis, Ind. 



BATTERY F 457 



Serj^, Charles Styers; residence, 45 South Illinois street, Indianapo- 
lis, Ind. 

Sergt. Ralph W. Hartins; residence. 1521 North "A" street, Elwood, 
Ind. 

Corp. Dean ^Y. Fuller; residence, 154 East Fifty-fourth street, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind. 

Corp. Raymond Quillson; residence, Brownsburg, Ind. 

Corp. Ray C. Rutherford; residence, McLoud, Okla. 

Corp. Robert M. Sockwell; residence, 2216 College avenue, Indianapo- 
lis, Ind. 

Corp. Ralph M. Millspauprh; residence, R. F. D. No.l, Comiskey, Ind. 

Corp. Paul Gillum; residence. Greenwood, Ind. 

Corp. Frank M. Sanders; residence, 1009 Park avenue, Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

Corp. August C. Klenke; residence, 1417 East Lewis street, Fort Wayne, 
Ind. 

Corp. Earl L. Hensley; residence, 323 North Eeville street, Indianapo- 
lis, Ind. 

Corp. James H. Noland; residence, 2308 Frankfort avenue, Louisville, 
Ky. 

Corp. Frank Hill; residence, R. F. D. No. 6, Franklin, Ind. 

Corp. Paul W. Smith; residence, 5920 Bellefontaine street, Indianapo- 
lis, Ind. 

Corp. William R. Bell; residence. Hotel Washington, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Corp. Paul Agee; residence, 1060 West Eighteenth street, Indianapo- 
lis, Ind. 

Corp. Murel T. Lankford; residence, R. R. J-1, Box No. 97, Indianapo- 
lis, Ind. 

Corp. Herman E. Stevason; residence, 817 Arbor avenue, Indianapo- 
lis, Ind. 

Corp. Robert T. Lawler; residence, 24 West Ashland avenue, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind. 

Corp. Hugh Kindlespargar; residence, Poneto, Ind. 

Corp. Henan F. McClain; residence, 1529 Hoyt avenue, Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

Corp John H. Arnold; residence, 867 West Twenty-ninth street, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind. 

Corp. Wilbur W. Myers; residence, 2016 Park avenue, Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

Corp. Ray W, Stakley; residence, 512 North Noble street, Indianapo- 
lis, Ind. 
Michael A. ter Linden; residence, 973 Glenwood road, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Corp. Francis M. Lineback; residence, 609 West Tenth street, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind. 

Cook James R. Bales; residence, Hymera. Ind. 

Cook Stephen Greer; residence, 2409 Jackson street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Cook Elbert Heaton; residence, Rosedale. Ind. 

Cook Scott Jones; residence. General Delivery, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Chief Mech. Robert W. Bromley; residence, 1065 Punch Bowl street, 
Honolulu, Hawaii. 

ChJef Mech. Lanice 0. Grimes; residence, 2818 Highland Place, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind. 

Mech. Harman F. Brubaker; residence, 114 South Union, Bluffton, Ind. 

Mech. Orville E. Leet; residence, 80 Euclid avenue, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Mech. Frederick T. Rice; residence, 944 Harman street, Fort Wayne, 
Ind. 

Mech. Emerald F. Whorley; residence, Jamestown, Ind. 

Saddler Guy J.McCombs; residence, 251 Chase street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Wag. Roy Cox; residence, Greenfield, Ind. 

29 



458 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

Wag« Ed Daubs; residence, Johnston City, 111. 

Wag. James L. Davis; residence, 428 West Fifth street, Indianapolis, 

Ind. 
Wag. William H. Eland; residence, Johnston City, 111. 
Wag. Clement C. McCoy; residence, Mt. Erie, 111. 

Wag. Carroll Fr Kramer; residence, 3611 North Meridian street, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind. 
Wag. Joseph J. Meurer; residence, R. F. D. No. 2, Lockport, 111. 
Wag. Dewey C. Moon; residence, 958 West Thirty-second street, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind. 
Wag. Thomas H. Munson; residence, Illiopolis, 111. 
Wag. Harry T. Jf^ewhouse; residence, 226 East Second street, Riishville, 

Ind. 
Wag. James B. Eiley; residence, R. F. D. No. 3, Paoli, Ind. 
Wag. Charles H. Snead; residence, 961 West Thirty-second street, 

Indianapolis, Ind. 
Wag. John W. Sprong; residence. R. F. D. No. 1, LaFountaine, Ind. 
Wag. Morris Sterzik; residence, Maywood, 111. 
Wag. Robert B. Ulill; residence. Blue Mound, 111. 
Wag. Thomas J. Weatherly; residence, Mechanicsburg, 111. 
Wag. Lynn E. Wilson; residence. Chili, Ind. 

Bugler Jforman W. Greig; residence, 1524 College avenue, Indianapo- 
lis, Ind. 
Bugler Cecil Y. Maddox; residence. North Salem, Ind. 
Bugler Moffett Ulrey; residence, 536 West Vermont street, Indianapo- 
lis, Ind. 
Privates, 1st Class 
Agee, Gayle; residence, 1060 West Eighteenth street, Indianapolis, 

Ind. 
Ballard, Ralph G.; residence, 217 Cherry street, Alton, 111. 
Bruce, Earl M.; residence, Brownsvalley, Ind. 
Clifton, Clifford; residence, 2117 North street, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Cory, John M.; residence, 2949 Kenwood avenue, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Crippin, Russell; residence, Chili, Ind. 
Davis, Howard E.; residence, 1001 West Market street, Crawfords- 

ville, Ind. 
Davis, Oscar E.; residence, R. F. D. No. 6, Franklin, Ind. 
Davis, Robert F.; residence, R. F. D. No. 6, Franklin, Ind. 
Ehinger, Clement A.; residence, 605 East Franklin street, Hunting- 
ton, Ind. 
Eversole, Clyde L.; residence, Mitchell, Ind. 
Garriott, Harvey J.; residence, Scottsburg, Ind. 
Golay, Carroll; residence, 1306 North Ketchum street, Indianapolis, 

Ind. 
Harrell, Waldo; residence, Marion, Ind. 
Hedrick, John D.; residence. La Fountaine, Ind. 
Henderson, Ted; residence, Ridge Farm, 111. 

Herron, Fred; residence, 823 North Belmer avenue, Connersville, Ind. 
Bohanfeld, Fred C; residence, 643 East Thirty-first street, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind. 
Hunt, Don C; residence, 212 Wiggins street, West Lafayette, Ind. 
Hunt, Russell; residence, Greenfield, Ind. 

Hyland, Grover J.; residence, R. F. D. No. 4, Center Point, Ind. 
Johnson, Forrest C.; residence, R. F. D. No. 2, Bluff ton, Ind. 
Johnson, Yenne S.; residence, 127 North Noble street, Indianapolis, 

Ind. 
Kehlenbeck, Earl; residence, Mt. Etna, Ind. 
Layson, William; residence, Owensboro, Ky. 



BATTERY F 459 



Privates 

McDowell, Louis C; residence, Thirtieth and Baltimore streets, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

McKay, Roy; residence, 1223 South street, Charleston, W. Va. 

Mahoney, Paul F.; residence, 1810 North "A" street, Elwood, Ind. 

Mullen, Lester; residence, Darlington, Ind. 

Neal, Chester; residence. Hickory, Ky. 

Jfelson, Forrest E.; residence, 1133 West Thirty-fourth street, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind. 

Niblack, Howard S.; residence, Butlerville, Ind. 

Pa^ano, Tony; residence, 224 Harman street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Palmer, Milliard; residence, 2146 North Olney street, Indianapolis. 
Ind. 

Redjnond, J^oble; residence, R. F. D. No. 6, Franklin, Ind. 

Robinson, Georgre S.; residence, 1319 Washington street, Lockport, 111. 

Scott, Guy; residence, R. F. D. No. 7, Huntington, Ind. 

Spauldin^, Marshall G.; residence, Greenview, 111. 

Speelman, Jesse; residence, R. F. D. No. 7, Wabash, Ind. 

Tolford, Andrew G.; residence, Sedalia, Mo. 

Walsh, Edward J.; residence, 508 West Fourty-fourth street, Chi- 
cago, 111. 

IVasson, Clement; residence, Marshall, Ind. 

Weber, Carl R.; residence, 611 Tacoma street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Wolford, Harold 0.; residence, 119 South Pennsylvania street, Indi- 
anapolis, Ind, 

Akers, Ervin T.; residence, Denver, 111. 

Andrews, Georgre M.; residence, 1119 Belle street, Alton, 111. 

Barr, Georpre I).; residence, Huntsville, Ala. 

Bartliff, Edmund L.; residence, Memphis, Tenn. 

Boecklen, Hu^o W.; residence, Venedy, 111. 

Bolt, James C.; residence, 1135 Knickerbocker avenue, Ft. Wayne, 
Ind. 

Bontz, Conrad. P.; residence, Mapleton, 111. 

Boyers, John F.; residence, 3412 Monroe street, Bellaire, Ohio. 

Bracht, William H.; residence, 1007 East Seventh street, Alton, 111. 

Bruner, Oliver G,; residence, 549 Thirteenth street, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Bush, Frank S.; residence, Riderwood, Ala. 

Carson, Joe; residence, 2129 North Meridian street, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Clark, James L; residence, 1216 North Hickory street, Joliet, 111. 

Cretzer, Oscar; residence, Ensley, Ala. 

Damask, Stanley; residence, Stevens Point, Wis. 

Fulwider, Edward R,; residence, Rantoul, 111. 

Gilliam, Chester; residence, Myrtle, Miss. 

Harms, Herbert G»; residence, 464 East Exchange street, Sycamore. 
111. 

Hooker, Samuel ; residence, Huntington, Ind. 

Howard, Lee R,; residence, 2621 Walnut street, Alton, 111. 

Howland, Myron E.; residence, Tampico, 111. 

Hurley, Victor H.; residence, Milton, Wis. 

Hurst, George W.; residence, Gid, La. 

Ingram, Reeves H.; residence, Delta, Ala. 

Kaufman, John E.; residence, 313 Mulberry street, Carlinville, 111. 

Kress, Raymond. V.; residence, Pontoosuc, 111. 

Kubacki, Vestie; residence, Dubois, 111. 

Leitshuch, Edward L.; residence, New Douglas, 111. 

Longo, Michele; residence, 608 North Green street, Chicago, 111. 

McAnulty, Charles E.; residence, Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Manning, Jerome H.; residence, 315 Carroll street. Alton, 111. 

Mathews, Ellerd 0.; residence, 439 East Third street, Alton, 111. 



460 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 



Priyates 

Moore, Thomas J.; residence, Hico, Tex. 

Moore, William H.; residence, 1002 Fairview avenue, Jackson, Miss. 

Morris, Ernest P.; residence, Alton, 111. 

Morris, Robert E.; residence, Dodson, La. 

Napier, Bellver J.; residence, Marshall, Mo. 

Mssenholtz, Max M.; residence, 1812 Butler street, St. Louis, Mo. 

Palmero, Mcholas; residence, Torbert, La. 

Pederson, Elmer M.; residence, 1618 Fifth street, North, Minneapo- 
lis, Minn. 

Pouclier, Leroy J.; residence, 80 North avenue, Aurora, 111. 

Powers, Charles E.; residence, Warsaw, Ind. 

Price, Samuel W.; residence, 1621 Eighteenth street, Nashville, Tenn. 

Reeve, Isaac H.; residence, R. F. D. No. 3, Jacksonville, 111. 

Robertson, Arlie; residence, 140 South Anderson street, Elwood, Ind. 

Rohde, Edwin; residence, 934 Clay street, Woodsctock, 111. 

Romans, John N.; residence, Marion, 111. 

Ross, Harry S.; residence, 917 South Seventh avenue, Rockford, 111. 

Ross, James A.; residence, 208 West Broadway street, Streator, 111. 

Rothschild, Abe J.; residence, 2845 West Fourteenth street, Chicago, 
111. 

Ryan, Hermiah T.; residence, 3836 Parnell avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Samperi, Dominic J.; residence, 3337 West Harrean street, Chicago, 
111. 

Schumann, Gustave H.; residence, 243 East Hundred Thirty-fourth 
street, Chicago, 111. 

Snowden, George E.; residence, Miler, Tex. 

Stanek, Albert T.; residence, Montgomery, Minn. 

Stanford, Herman; residence. New Albany, Miss. 

Stein, Isadore; residence, 1508 South Turner avenue, Chicago, 111. 

Stork, Godfrey D.; residence, 153 State street, Madine, N. Y. 

Tomczyk, John J.; residence, R. F. D. No. 4, Grand Rapids, Wis. 

yistine, Joe.; residence, 5510 West Twenty-third Place, Cicero, IH. 

Waldeck, John I.; residence, Miami, Fla. 

Wartnebe, George W.; residence. New Berlin, 111. 

Wilson, Clarence F.; residence, 316 North Line street, DuQuoin, Jll. 

Worley, Jeptha E.; residence, Hawthorne, Fla. 



Sanitary Detachment 139th Field Artillery 

The Detachment Medical Department 139th Heavy Field 
Artillery Regiment, United States Army, was organized at 
Rushville, Indiana, during the months of June and July, 
1917, by Lowell M. Green, M. D., of that city pursuant to 
instructions, Headquarters Indiana National Guard, Indi- 
anapolis, Indiana. 

This unit was in a large measure a Rush County organ- 
ization. On its entrance into service, 31 of the 33 enlisted 
men on its roster were from Rush County. 

July 13, 1917, the detachment was mustered in State 
service and on July 27, 1917, accepted for Federal service 
by Captain J. B. McCormick, M. C, U. S. Army, as the 
Detachment Medical Department, 4th Indiana Infantry. 
It consisted of four officers and thirty-three enlisted, with 
headquarters at Rushville, Indiana, under the command of 
Major N. A. Gary, M. C, I. N. G. 

Under proclamation by the President of the United 
States the detachment was drafted into the service of the 
United States on August 5, 1917, and mobilized at Rush- 
ville, Indiana. 

The detachment joined the Regiment at Ft. Benjamin 
Harrison, Indiana, August 29, 1917, and a Regimental In- 
firmary was opened that day. The first Red Cross flag to 
hang in front of the Medical Headquarters was given by 
the Chaplain. 

However, Major Gary, Lieutenant Murphy, Sergeants 
Gottman and Craig responded to the draft summons and 
were on duty beginning August 5, 1917, at the Fair 
Grounds w^here the Regiment was mobilized. 

Arriving in Camp Shelby, Miss., September 27, 1917, 
the detachment went on duty at once in the building set 



462 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

apart for a Regimental Infirmary and continued for just 
nine days less than one year to keep on sight and charge 
of the health and sanitation of the regiment. 

Many changes in personnel took place, disrupting the 
original organization. The unit had been at Camp Shelby 
but a few days when Captain Don C. McClelland and 
Lieutenant Samuel Murphy were assigned elsewhere and 
Captain Raymond A. Akin, of Bloomington, Indiana, was 
assigned for duty with the detachment. Later, Lieutenant 
Hale H. Pearsey, Dental Corps, another Rushville boy, was 
assigned to the organization. 

Changes in enlisted personnel were as follows: 

Chipman, McBride and Gottman to Officers Training 
Schools; Conrad, Caldwell and Schrichte to be Sergeants; 
Hogsett to be Dental Assistant ; Havens to be Cook ; Joyce, 
Green, Stoops, Mitchell and Walker to be Privates, 1st 
Class, in addition to Benning, Dagler, Sullivan, Spivey 
and Osborne; Conde and Sharp discharged from the 
service on account physical disability; and Keller to the 
U. S. Guards. 

At Camp Shelby liberal subscriptions were made to 
the Second and Third Liberty Bond Issues, and the 
unit was insured 100 per cent with the War Risk Insur- 
ance Bureau. 

The ordinary ills to which the flesh is heir were put to 
rout, but the close assembling of 1,500 men is morally cer- 
tain to start something. First measles broke out, then fol- 
lowed mumps, some serious complications resulting which 
required Base Hospital care, but generally speaking these 
epidemics, and later a slight scourge of influenza, were so 
thoroughly handled that no serious results followed in their 
wake. 

Under the vigilant care of our Sanitary Officer the area 
of the 139th Filed Artillery was the cleanest and neatest 



CAPTAIN LOWELL M. GREEN, M. C. 
1ST LT. H. H. McCASLIN, D. C. CAPT. FRANK E. LONG, D. C. 



464 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

regimental area in Camp Shelby. We point with pride to 
the emphatic circumstance that of all the sickness in Camp 
Shelby less than four per cent was in the 139th Field 
Artillery. 

The Sanitary Detachment, accompanying the 139th 
Field Artillery, left Camp Shelby, for embarkation port 
on September 19th, 1918; left Camp Upton, N. Y., on 
October 6th, and arrived at Liverpool; thence, on October 
17th, to Camp Codford, leaving there for Southampton, 
and continuing the same day to Cherbourg. From there 
the unit left for France, arriving at Ploermel, thence to 
Meucon and to Brest. Leaving Brest on December 15th 
for home, it arrived at Hoboken on the 23rd, was trans- 
ferred to Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana, and dis- 
charged from the service on January 18th, 1919. 

Enroute, attentive care was given at all times, and no 
sickness to speak of developed during period of travel, al- 
ways after detraining, the trains our regiment left were 
fit for immediate use. 

On' board the transport 242, which is the good S. S. 
Cedric, the detachment was put to the supreme test, it was 
weighed in the balances and found equal to the occasion. 

Spanish influenza broke out among the troops. Hospital 
equipment was meagre. Only one man died on the voyage, 
and it was in the case of the sick soldiers that the detach- 
ment gave a full measure of devotion. No hours were too 
long, no task too consuming. Without stint the men gave 
themselves devotedly to the care of the men who were ill. 

Even in the panic following the submarine attack every 
man remained steadfastly at his post near the bunk of some 
man almost fatally ill, a heroism equal to any, on any 
battle field and a devotion to duty that should be written 
into the annals of our country's history. 




CAPTAIN HENRY B. POWELL, M. C. 



466 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 

On account of sickness the following men were left 
in England at the time the organization went on to 
France: Cooning, Mitchell and Walker. In France, due 
to sickness, it was necessary to leave McNeeley, Glover 
and Pabst. 

This organization has a record in that it had no A. W. 
O. L., or Summary or General Court Martial cases against 
any member. 



SANITARY DETACHMENT 467 



ROSTER OF SANITARY DETACHMEJJ^T 4TH INDIANA INFANTRY 

Maj. Nathaniel A. Cary, M. C; commissioned July 7, 1917; residence, 
Crawfordsville, Ind.; assigned as The Surgeon 139 F. A., September 
30, 1917. 

Capt. Don C. McClelland, M. C; commissioned September 26, 1916; 
residence, Lafayette, Ind.; assigned as Capt, M. C, 139 F. A., Sep- 
tember 30, 1917. 

1st Lieut. Samuel C. Murphy, M. C; commissioned July 20, 1917; resi- 
dence, Warsaw, Ind.; assigned as 1st Lieut., M. C, 139 F. A., Sep- 
tember 30, 1917. 

1st Lieut. Walter >V. Gochenour, D. C; commissioned July 20, 1917; 
residence, Brookston, Ind.; assigned as 1st Lieut., D. C, 139 F. A., 
September 30, 1917. 

1st Lieut. Lowell M. Green, M. C; commissioned July 21, 1917; resi- 
dence, Rushville, Ind.; assigned as 1st Lieut., M. C, 139 F. A., 
September 30, 1917. Promoted Captain August, 1918. 

Serj^eants 

Serfft. Craig, Robert R.; enlisted June 20, 1916; residence. North Man- 
chester, Ind.; trans, as Sergt. to San. Det., 139 F. A., September, 30, 
1917. 

Sergt. Chipman, Albert B.; enlisted July 25, 1917; residence. Crown 
Point, Ind.; trans, as Sergt. to San. Det., 139 F. A., September 30, 
1917. 

Sergt. McBride, Stanton; enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Rushville, 
Ind.; trans, as Sergt. to San. Det., 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 

Sergt. Gottman, Clifford W.; enlisted July 13, 1917; residence, Cincin- 
nati, Ohio; trans, as Sergt. to San. Det., 139 F. A., September 30, 
1917. 

Priyates, 1st cl. 
Denning, Raymond; enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to San. Det., 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 
Caldwell, Berlin T.; enlisted July 30, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to San. Det., 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 
Conrad, Clements J.; enlisted July 13, 1917; residence. North Madison, 
Ind.; trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to San. Det., 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 
Dagler, Clayton D.; enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to San. Det., 139 F, A., September 30, 1917. 
Osborne, Fred; enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to San. Det, 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 
Spivey, Wilbur R,; enlisted July 16, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to San. Det., 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 
Sullivan, Jerry; enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind.; 
trans, as Pvt. 1 cl. to San. Det., 139 F. A„ September 30, 1917. 

Privates 

Conde, Scott, Jr.; enlisted July 13, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to San. Det, 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 
Cooning, Ed M.; enlisted July 11, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to San. Det, 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 
Farthing, Osro L.; enlisted July 23, 1917; residence, Rushville, 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to San. Det, 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 
Finney, Marion T.; enlisted July 13, 1917; residence Rushville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to San. Det, 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 
Foster, Thomas S.; enlisted July 13, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to San. Det, 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 



468 THE STORY OF THE 139TH FIELD ARTILLERY 



Privates 
Gathmaii, Samuel W.; enlisted July 13, 1917; residence, Greentown, 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to San. Det., 139 P. A., September 30, 1917. 
GloTer, William E.; enlisted July 13, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to San. Det, 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 
Green, Harry K,; enlisted July 13, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to San. Det, 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 
Havens, Lon A^ Jr.; enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to San. Det, 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 
Hermansdorfer, John F.; enlisted July 28, 1917; residence, Rushville, 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to San. Det, 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 
Hogsett, George Y.; enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to San. Det, 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 
Joyce, Forrest E.; enlisted July 23, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to San. Det, 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 
Keller, William T.; enlisted July 13, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to San. Det., 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 
King, Leo H.; enlisted July 14, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to San. Det, 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 
King, Russell H.; enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to San. Det, 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 
McJfeely, Robert F.; enlisted July 26, 1917; residence, Shelbyville, 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to San. Det, 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 
Mitchell, Ernest M.; enlisted August 21, 1917; residence, Rushville, 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt to San. Det., 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 
Stoops, Errol J.; enlisted July 13, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to San. Det, 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 
Sharp, Alfred, Jr.; enlisted July 14, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to San. Det., 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 
Schrichte, Charles A.; enlisted July 19, 1917; residence, Rushville, 

Ind.; trans, as Pvt. to San. Det, 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 
Walker, James F.; enlisted July 14, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to San. Det, 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 
Worth, William M.; enlisted July 10, 1917; residence, Rushville, Ind.; 

trans, as Pvt. to San. Det., 139 F. A., September 30, 1917. 

Additions to the Sanitary Detachment, 139th Field Artillery, 
After Entrance into Federal Service 

Lieut. Col. John H. Blackburn, M. C, Bowling Green, Ky. 

Capt, Henry B. Powell, M. C, Ocean Springs, Miss. 

Capt. Raymond A. Akin, M. C, Bloomington, Ind. 

Capt. John C. Lynch, M. C, Kansas City, Mo. 

Capt. Leon L. Myer, M. C, Memphis, Tenn. 

1st Lieut Frank E. Long, D. C, Indianapolis, Ind. 

1st Lieut. H. H. McCaslin, D. C^., Sanford, Fla. 

Enlisted Men: 

Allen, Harry, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Buehler, Oscar L., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Griffin, John W., Trenton, N. C. 

Kette, Chas. C, Vicksburg, Miss. 

McGee, Wm. H., Jr., Vicksburg, Miss. 

Patterson, James L., Natchez, Miss. 

Quigley, Michael J., Richmond, Ind. 

Ostroffsky, Ameil G., Vicksburg, Miss. 

Unverzagt, John F., Richmond, Ind. 

Wetherbee, Perron G., Waynesboro, Miss. 

West, John I., Waynesboro, Miss. 

Pabst, Chas., Ocean Springs, Miss. 



M'7054' 



//6 



THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARY 





P !» B^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^l 


il 

• 


' '^^<^<mH^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^| 



m